Question about non running Supra.

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  1. #1
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    Question about non running Supra.

    Hi, so I saw a 89 MKII Supra for 1000 on CL today. It's not running, and I was wondering if I can snag it for a really good price and have it be something silly like a fuel pump or something. Can someone tell me common problems with '89 Supras not working? I'm sorry btw, I'm still extremely new to Supras and new to doing car things in general.

    Also, sorry for bad english, not my first lang. and here is the CL ad btw

    Can't send links so will be a dot between the http: ht.tp://oi63.tinypic.com/2uhua85.jpg

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  3. #2
    CelicaSupra.com Member Khlause's Avatar
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    Thats a Mk3 Supra, but over all nice cars. The question you need to answer is do you get one you need to fix, or save up for one that is already restored.

  4. #3
    Boosting Mod SilverMk2's Avatar
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    In before the BHG comments... It could be anything from a blown fuse to a siezed engine. An automatic NA late model Mk3 is a great platform for a 1JZ or 2jZ swap

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  6. #4
    Founding Member pdupler's Avatar
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    Just realize that while most mechanical parts are available to keep these cars on the road, virtually none of the cosmetic trim or Supra-specific luxury feature parts are available new anymore which means that restoring one to like new condition is all but impossible. These are not Camaros or Mustangs. You can't just click an online catalog and have any part you need show up from Taiwan in time for the weekend. And they are not worth but $10 to $15K if you manage to complete the project. If you want one that looks really nice and everything works, then you could save up $10,000, locate and purchase one already in well-preserved condition far quicker than you could start with any $1,000 basketcase. Just want to make sure you don't have too high expectations. In the pictures I see at least $7,000 worth of paint and body work needed, not including whatever it might take to fix the mystery no-start situation.

    If you can live with the way it looks and just want to fix it and drive it as-is or plan to make it a track car, then it could be a bargain depending what is wrong with it. But there is serious risk involved since you can't test drive it to make sure that the transmission, brakes and everything else works. Maybe its something simple. I once bought one at a charity auction for $200 that wouldn't start and it wound up being just a bad battery cable. Its possible. But then you get it running and find that it needs a $2500 transmission overhaul. Given that it will need $700 in tires right away and if you get it running and driving, then its barely a $2,000 car at that point, then I think you need to talk them into some more money off. Seriously, you should view it as a parts car and you should not pay much more for it than what your local salvage yard would give them for it. That way if it can't be fixed economically, you can get most of your money back easily enough or even make a tiny profit by parting it out yourself.

    I can't think of anything that is peculiar to mk3 Supras that would cause a no-start situation. Toyotas were well-made and very durable. It could be just about anything. Proceed according to general maintenance diagnostic procedures confirming battery voltage, cranking rpm, fuel, ignition, and compression. Good luck.
    Last edited by pdupler; 02-21-2017 at 08:44 PM.
    Phil D.
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  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdupler View Post
    Just realize that while most mechanical parts are available to keep these cars on the road, virtually none of the cosmetic trim or Supra-specific luxury feature parts are available new anymore which means that restoring one to like new condition is all but impossible. These are not Camaros or Mustangs. You can't just click an online catalog and have any part you need show up from Taiwan in time for the weekend. And they are not worth but $10 to $15K if you manage to complete the project. If you want one that looks really nice and everything works, then you could save up $10,000, locate and purchase one already in well-preserved condition far quicker than you could start with any $1,000 basketcase. Just want to make sure you don't have too high expectations. In the pictures I see at least $7,000 worth of paint and body work needed, not including whatever it might take to fix the mystery no-start situation.

    If you can live with the way it looks and just want to fix it and drive it as-is or plan to make it a track car, then it could be a bargain depending what is wrong with it. But there is serious risk involved since you can't test drive it to make sure that the transmission, brakes and everything else works. Maybe its something simple. I once bought one at a charity auction for $200 that wouldn't start and it wound up being just a bad battery cable. Its possible. But then you get it running and find that it needs a $2500 transmission overhaul. Given that it will need $700 in tires right away and if you get it running and driving, then its barely a $2,000 car at that point, then I think you need to talk them into some more money off. Seriously, you should view it as a parts car and you should not pay much more for it than what your local salvage yard would give them for it. That way if it can't be fixed economically, you can get most of your money back easily enough or even make a tiny profit by parting it out yourself.

    I can't think of anything that is peculiar to mk3 Supras that would cause a no-start situation. Toyotas were well-made and very durable. It could be just about anything. Proceed according to general maintenance diagnostic procedures confirming battery voltage, cranking rpm, fuel, ignition, and compression. Good luck.
    Thanks a bunch for the indepth response. I was expecting "blown BHG" like said from SilverMK2, I concluded that I'm just gonna save up and save for a higher quality Supra as this could be something stupid as a bad battery to something as bad as a BHG or tranny overhaul like you said. Thank you guys again.

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