Is it Good To Buy Old Cars ?
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  1. #1
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    Is it Good To Buy Old Cars ?

    Hi, I'm little bit confused about it. How is it beneficial to go for an old car ? Is this good to buy ? If you have any thoughts please feel free to tell .

    Thanks

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  3. #2
    CelicaSupra.com Member '82supra's Avatar
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    It all depends what you're looking for. Something oldscool, made to last (afterall they are) and reasonably priced vs. plastic and a rubber band for a motor that'll cost your left nut, well...the choice is yours. But if you can't wrench or have little idea about cars, either be willing to learn - old cars are great for that, or buy a newer one that will likely be less problematic.

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  4. #3
    CelicaSupra.com Member sowsley's Avatar
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    Lets see. Baby boomers are getting older and downsizing and the younger generations are not into cars like their parents. At some point, I predict prices falling as demand decreases. Take for instance, Model A Fords. Large community of aging members, dying off one by one. Clubs are shrinking and dying out, one by one. Cars will be collectible for a long time, but the number of people really into restoring and driving them will continue to decrease. Good clean original or well restored cars will hold their value or appreciate - the closer to art forms they are considered by the general public, the more valuable. Parts are hard to find, finding good mechanics with experience to work on them is a challenge and can be very expensive. The future is most likely electric, causing either further decline.
    Bad decisions make the BEST stories.

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  5. #4
    CelicaSupra.com Member supkar's Avatar
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    Read the news the other day. Woman's car suddenly stopped and she saw smoke under the hood and without electrical power, her seat belts, windows and door locks did not function. The fire was growing and she was panicking. A cop saw this and tried to use his baton to break the glass. After much pounding he finally made a hole big enough for the woman to crawl out. High tech has it's pitfalls. Older cars don't have these problems.
    83-Red P-type , 6M,. LJM strut-bar, RC intake,Thorley header,Tenzo 17" wheels, cross-drilled rotors, Eibach springs, KYB shocks, 85 hatch and int., 82 header panel=Frankenkar

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  6. #5
    CelicaSupra.com Member
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    At the risk of looking like a hippy on a car forum, driving old cars is green.

    They may not be *as* efficient, that can be improved upon. But the "embodied energy" as it's called in the construction industry - the energy, labor and raw materials that were required to produce the old car - is enormous, and becomes a huge savings when you resist the urge to buy new.

    Get a good looking older car, slap a more efficient/higher performance used engine in it, and you've got a super green street machine.

  7. #6
    CelicaSupra.com Member supkar's Avatar
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    Yeah, he's right. It's also occurred to me that buying used and restoring with used parts is recycling .
    83-Red P-type , 6M,. LJM strut-bar, RC intake,Thorley header,Tenzo 17" wheels, cross-drilled rotors, Eibach springs, KYB shocks, 85 hatch and int., 82 header panel=Frankenkar

    87 4 Runner, White, 22RE, 302K on original motor, still strong

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  8. #7
    CelicaSupra.com Member ddd228's Avatar
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    "They don't make' em like they used to".
    Older cars have less CRAP to deal with.
    Carburetors,no air bags,no info-tainment sytems and so much more.
    Old school is cool.
    Depends on your level of mechanical experience.
    Mechanics DO drive old cars.
    It REALLY depends what you think is an old car.60's and 70's?
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  9. #8
    CelicaSupra.com Member
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    Estimates show equivalent pollution of up to 50,000 miles worth of emissions for every new car produced. I'm pro-hybrid but, as has been shown, the full life cycle cost of a Prius with batteries puts the Dodge 3500 driver ahead of you..

    The big picture always looms out there.

    Another thing, cars are not investments. Better to kiss that dollar goodbye when it goes into a vehicle than pretend as much. They are depreciating personal property built with consumable goods that wear out. Some ultra rare exceptions exist, but this is a Toyota forum. Buy, build, drive, enjoy, but don't expect to make money.

    Oh...BUT: You get a way cooler ride that's all your own for 5-10 grand, versus buying something for way more off the lot with a loan (or worse yet, leasing) so I'm not saying it isn't money well spent, as long as your necessities are covered first. Don't be the guy with three cars outside his crappy apartment, be the guy with one crappy car outside own his house.

  10. #9
    CelicaSupra.com Member ddd228's Avatar
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    Well said.^^^^^.
    Just buy a "driver".
    Yeah,buy it for cash and dive right in!
    Been there. You may not want to buy a Supra.
    Mine is 32 years OLD.
    Dave in Seattle. I keep LATE hours.Hidden Content
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  11. #10
    Founding Member pdupler's Avatar
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    Assuming you're talking about for daily use and not as a weekend toy. Supra is getting a bit too old for everyday use. First time I heard, "Sorry, part no longer available" from the Toyota dealership parts counter guy was in about 1996 and now there's virtually nothing in stock. So the biggest disadvantage is having to hunt for parts. If an old Supra breaks down, you're not likely to fix it on the side of the road, rather you'll tow it home where it will sit for weeks while you scour the internet for an elusive good used replacement part. On the other hand, buying an older model "common" car like a Honda Accord could be a great money-saving strategy because there are so many of them that supplies of new parts are still stocked and where a less frequently replaced part is not available new, the salvage yards are full of donors. You just have to realize that its going to need those repairs much more frequently than a newer car.

    Also, if your old car gets smashed in an accident, minor damage will cost more to fix than the car is worth. Doesn't make financial sense to carry full coverage, but then most people also don't have the cash to replace it in an emergency or pay to fix it themselves. If it gets dented, it will likely stay dented. If its the other drivers fault, the insurance is only going to pay "book value" which is practically nothing. They know that most people driving 30+ year old cars are doing so because they can't afford better. They know you have no choice but to accept their fist lowball offer because above all, you need to buy another car, ANY car, in order to avoid missing work or school.

    Which brings up the point of reliability. You know the older car will break down more often, but you don't know when. If your job requires you be on-time or you have to travel for work, then an old car may be a risk you don't want to take.

    As long as you have another car or another way to get around, borrow, uber, public transit, etc. then you may want to consider an old car, but if you don't have a backup, then get the newest car you can safely afford.
    Phil D.
    85 Silver 6m-gte, completed 2000

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