Resto mod from rolling shell - Page 13

Page 13 of 24 FirstFirst ... 3111213141523 ... LastLast
Results 121 to 130 of 237
  1. #121
    CelicaSupra.com Member ddd228's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    N. Seattle.
    Posts
    5,189
    GOOD JOB!!!!!
    Just grease the tapered part of the tie rod end and gently tap it into place.
    Be sure that the threads and not damaged,first.A little oil will help to lube the threads,first.
    You may need to use a thread file to the threads.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Thread-Repa...-/372349145095
    Unless you have some metric DIES.
    Use an impact gun to get 'er down,carefully. Even an electric one will work fine.
    I have a 12 V. one that does OK.
    Dave in Seattle. I keep LATE hours.Hidden Content
    '84 type "L" ,Auto ,daily driver. Dk blue.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    CelicaSupra.com
    Advertisements

  3. #122
    CelicaSupra.com Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Virginia is for cops
    Posts
    203
    Threads seem fine, nut will go up and down the whole length. Only have standard dies in this household, no metric sadly.
    I just hadn't thought to tap it in with a SFH before trying to screw it in.
    Ball joint seems to be in great shape, old grease looked bad though, so I repacked it with some synthetic grease and slapped the new boot on.

  4. #123
    CelicaSupra.com Member SupraFiend's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    10,107
    I have an off the shelf 2 jaw puller that works great on the tie rod ends.
    Black 86 mk2 Project Car
    New SDR 86 mk2 Daily User, Highway Cruiser AND Parking Lot Abuser in the works!

  5. Remove Advertisements
    CelicaSupra.com
    Advertisements

  6. #124
    CelicaSupra.com Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Virginia is for cops
    Posts
    203
    Quote Originally Posted by SupraFiend View Post
    I have an off the shelf 2 jaw puller that works great on the tie rod ends.
    My three jaw puller worked very well on the rear control arms. Though I hate it, most frustrating tool I've ever used in my life. The amount of force required to separate the tie rod ends was phenomenal, I doubt any puller would have worked.

    Any inputs on installing poly bushings? it seems some you need the old metal sleeve around them and some you don't. Just go by what fits I guess?

    Off the top of my head, the subframes don't seem to need the sleeve, but the control arms front and rear seem to need the sleeve.

  7. #125
    CelicaSupra.com Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Virginia is for cops
    Posts
    203
    POR15 coating on parts seems serviceable even if it's not applied ideally... I think it will be fine. Pressed in some new bushings today

    Also just noticed some weirdness I'm not sure how I didn't spot until today. There seems to be a dent in the front frame rail inside the engine bay. My guess is since this car has had a 1J swap before it got donked during a engine pull out- put in. I'm not super worried about it but should I be? I guess I'll measure some of the reference distances given in the TSRM and make sure they're all kosher.



  8. #126
    CelicaSupra.com Member SupraFiend's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    10,107
    Yup that looks like some BFH clearancing there.

    Bushings, depends on the brand. Some come with new sleeves, some don't. Raptor took care of that at one point and someone made some before, I believe that was for the Energy Suspension bushings. The SuperPros come with them as I recall.
    Black 86 mk2 Project Car
    New SDR 86 mk2 Daily User, Highway Cruiser AND Parking Lot Abuser in the works!

  9. #127
    CelicaSupra.com Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Virginia is for cops
    Posts
    203
    Bushings fit pretty easy. I used a neighbors press to install them which was so much easier. The LCA bushing comes with this donut that I think I know where it goes but I'm not positive.

    I need a new boot for the ball joint connection for the steering arm. Energy generic boot fits the smaller tie rod joint, but I'm not sure what my options are for the bigger one that is wired on.

    The ball itself seems fine, no play, but there was no zerk fitting installed on the bottom which means the chocolate pudding I cleaned off the joint was probably factory grease. Gonna install a fitting and pump it full of synthetic and hopefully force out the majority of the old grease, just need a boot.

  10. #128
    CelicaSupra.com Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Arlington, WA
    Posts
    1,425
    New ball joint boots and the wires are still available new from Toyota. And the deal on the grease fittings IIRC, is that Toyota recommended installing them to grease the ball joints and then reinstalling the plug. That would certainly prevent them being damaged relatively easily from road debris or driving over a curb or something similar and bottoming out.
    On the ES front LCA bushings, there's a design flaw. Compared to the OEM bushings that also hold the arm in position front to back, installing the ES bushings into the OEM shell and then installing their "thrust washer" on the rear side doesn't totally take up all the space between the arm and its mounting flange, which allow the arm to move front to back some. NOT GOOD. I sent many pics and measurements to ES and their product manager stated that they'd been selling them for years and no one had reported any problems? He finally offered to send me a second set of thrust washers to try. Unfortunately, 2 together was a bit too thick and they almost instantly worked as out of position as possible away from each other. I finally decided that the proper solution was to have 5mm thick aluminum "spacers" made with the ID to fit over the rear of the OEM shell and OD a little larger than their provided thrust washer. Problem totally solved. At the time, it wasn't much more expensive to have 6 sets of them made than 1 or 2, and I knew that others would need them as well. They're long since gone but easily remade. Everyone that installed them said they were the perfect fix for the flawed design.
    Why did I go to all the trouble of trying to deal directly with ES? Because it was the right thing to do to solve the problem. Unfortunately it was like arguing with rocks and negotiating with terrorists. The only real reason I bothered at all is because their bushing are the only ones that aren't so rock hard that they could easily be mistaken for solid metal ones. They're a nice upgrade from even new OEM rubber without a huge ride and noise penalty.

  11. #129
    CelicaSupra.com Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Virginia is for cops
    Posts
    203
    Quote Originally Posted by ray85p View Post
    New ball joint boots and the wires are still available new from Toyota. And the deal on the grease fittings IIRC, is that Toyota recommended installing them to grease the ball joints and then reinstalling the plug. That would certainly prevent them being damaged relatively easily from road debris or driving over a curb or something similar and bottoming out.
    On the ES front LCA bushings, there's a design flaw. Compared to the OEM bushings that also hold the arm in position front to back, installing the ES bushings into the OEM shell and then installing their "thrust washer" on the rear side doesn't totally take up all the space between the arm and its mounting flange, which allow the arm to move front to back some. NOT GOOD. I sent many pics and measurements to ES and their product manager stated that they'd been selling them for years and no one had reported any problems? He finally offered to send me a second set of thrust washers to try. Unfortunately, 2 together was a bit too thick and they almost instantly worked as out of position as possible away from each other. I finally decided that the proper solution was to have 5mm thick aluminum "spacers" made with the ID to fit over the rear of the OEM shell and OD a little larger than their provided thrust washer. Problem totally solved. At the time, it wasn't much more expensive to have 6 sets of them made than 1 or 2, and I knew that others would need them as well. They're long since gone but easily remade. Everyone that installed them said they were the perfect fix for the flawed design.
    Why did I go to all the trouble of trying to deal directly with ES? Because it was the right thing to do to solve the problem. Unfortunately it was like arguing with rocks and negotiating with terrorists. The only real reason I bothered at all is because their bushing are the only ones that aren't so rock hard that they could easily be mistaken for solid metal ones. They're a nice upgrade from even new OEM rubber without a huge ride and noise penalty.
    Excellent, I'll have to call some dealerships with a part number from the book. I had assumed they'd be disco'd so I tried to order a generic one that looked close... it was not close.

    Thanks for the heads up on that bushing I was actually wondering about that myself. I'll look for some sort of washer that fit those specs as a spacer.



    Here's the washer and here is how I assume it's supposed to be installed



    Definitely not flush. Here is the other side



    Much more contact area between the bushing and bracket on the front subframe. It would probably work without that "washer" but it would wear quicker.

    Also eyeballed some ES end link grommets for the rear.... too big



    the outer diameter isn't an issue so I made up a jig and I'm going to cut them down to size with a miter saw to make sure they're flat



    I'll also have to chamfer the nipple so it fits better in the RCA.

  12. #130
    CelicaSupra.com Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Arlington, WA
    Posts
    1,425
    That's where the thrust washer indeed should be installed. If it was the correct thickness, it would be flush with the end of the bushing and sleeve on the back side to keep the arm from being able to move front to back. The spacer you'll need will fit between the outside of the thrust washer and the rear mounting tab. Before I had the spacers made, I kept trying different combinations of big ass washers to prove the concept. I finally found a combination that together were perfect, greased everything big time and tried it out for a couple of weeks.
    There's an angled, sloped rubber railroad crossing in the middle of a curve where a couple of roads cross over, one above on a bridge and the other below. Hitting that nearly always had been a complete guessing game as to exactly which direction the car would dart. The first couple of times, it surprised the f(iretr)uck out of me. Fortunately, I still have razor quick reaction time. Otherwise, I'd surely have gone off the road for sure a couple of times. Then I'd expect something to happen and be ready for it. Installing the spacers on the front LCA bushings vastly changed things. It would nearly always dart there, but it was pretty much the same every time. Just like on road race cars where a bit of toe out really helps when initiating turn in for corners, but can sometimes make hard braking a little well... butt puckering. So I dialed in a bit more toe in. Then after a while, a little more. And other than the cars tendency to follow the stupid grooves worn in all the roads here because they allow studded tires from November to April, just so the idiot drivers here can get to work the 2 or 3 days we might get snow every year. Then they have to grind down and completely repave everything every few years. It would be a zillion times better and at least that many times cheaper to simply pay those fum ducks to stay home those 2 - 3 days.
    I think the reason ES thinks that these are OK is because nobody seems to figure out what to do with a thrust washer that doesn't seem to fit anywhere and nearly always just leaves them out. The perceived "improvement" in handling is very likely just because it's different than with the worn out OEM rubber bushings and these are supposed to be better, so what's happening now simply has to be better, right? I've seen these installed on a few other cars and not one of them had the thrust washers and the needed spacers to keep the arm properly in place. I took a couple of them apart and there was noticeable wear both on the inside and outside of the bushings from the arm moving back and forth, actually front to back that was definitely not symmetrical. It was worn in an odd sort of semi spiral way more on the outside but some inside as well.
    So have those spacers machined and the few $'s it cost you will be way, way more than worth it.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts