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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This car sold for $29,000.


A perfect car in absolutely original factory condition. If you translate the original 1984 price of around $14,000+ to today's dollars it is probably a steal at that price!

I will say that I prefer my leather interior, at least that's what I am telling myself!
 

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We've had two go for over $30K in the past 18 months. I've been saying for years that they would be selling well over $30K eventually but its happening about five years before I expected. I figured it'd have to wait until my age cohort was closer to retirement but I guess I forgot about the mid-life crisis effect. However, these were all ultra-low miles, museum quality so I would caution our readers not to think their average mk2 is now worth $15K. The curve for collector cars is shaped something like below with value on the y-axis and condition on the x-axis. I think we're in for a bit of a slowdown once the COVID19 stimulus money is completely spent and all the impacts are fully felt, but anybody that wants one better take advantage soon. Toyota isn't going to make any more of them and eventually, all of my high school classmate's adult children will finally move out of the house for the last time and make room in the garage for one of the brand new cars we all wished for back when we were in Driver's Ed.

15368
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Out of curiosity I just checked my April, '83 issue of Road &Track. The price quoted in the comparison test for the '83 "P" type was $15,838, so my '84 with leather was probably over $16,000 list. Anyone with degree in economics care to guess what that would be today?

Capt Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #6
OK, I asked Google. The answer is:
In other words, $16,000 in 1983 is equivalent in purchasing power to about $41,622.65 in 2020, a difference of $25,622.65 over 37 years. The 1983 inflation rate was 3.21%.
 

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Those are great reference pictures. I've been searching for pictures for some time to show what the original muffler baffles looked like. Also realized I'm missing two 10mm bolts in my under-engine plastic tray.

Also, what are those white plug-looking things inside the doors and door jambs on both sides? My 85 doesn't seem to have those.
 

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The vehicle was rust proofed with Waxoyl or similar. A wand is attached to a compressor and a liquid corrosion preventative is sprayed into all the nooks and crannies. It works it's way into the seams and then solidifies to a wax-like consistency. If access to a spot is limited or impossible, a hole is drilled, and then a plastic "button" is inserted to close the hole. I did my car around 1992 when my oldest daughter went off to college and could not take her car. So I put my car on jack stands in the garage and used her car for the daily driver. Well, after all, I did buy the car and was paying the insurance! When we stripped it to bare metal three years ago for new paint, the only rust was in the lower parts of the rear wheel wells where dirt, salt, and moisture gets trapped between the body and the flares. The worst was on the aft side of the right rear wheel where there is that extra piece that protects the fuel filler pipe. The two front fenders were completely rust free. No rust in any body seams, or the rear bottom of the lift back. And yes, it was a daily driver, summer, winter, rain, snow, whatever, for ten years until I bought my first SUV in 1997. I did not notice the white plugs until you pointed them out. As a matter of fact, now that I see them, I think it kind of detracts from the overall presentation. I was able to do almost all the car without drilling holes. It just takes a little more time to remove some panels to get access. For instance, the area behind the rear of the door jamb can be accessed by simply removing one screw and that black vent thingy. Drilling a hole there is completely unnecessary. The holes I did have to drill in the rocker panels are hidden under the threshold piece that holds the edges of the carpet down. You can do the doors by removing the door cards. Well, I think you get the idea!

You do have a good idea about using the photos for future reference. I think I will down load them to an external hard drive.

Capt Bob
 

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Yeah, I downloaded all the pictures last night. All 200+ of them. I figured it was for the Cosmoline/Waxoyl, etc based on the picture inside the rear quarter jack area. My car was done when new, or really close to it, but thankfully not drilled anywhere. It's a complete mess to work around, especially since the a-hole did it most everywhere, including the engine bay, inside the hood, all inner fenders, etc. I'm not complaining too much though since the car is exceptionally clean and lacking rust in the usual areas.
 

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Collector car, maybe a Sunday driver, I don't mind having putting miles on the clock when you enjoy the ride :cool:
 

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It needs to be driven some but it may in some ways be too late. Often what happens if you start driving a car that has sat unused for decades is that it will begin to leak profusely from every gasket and seal because they've all dried out When you start driving it, the dry seals disintegrate. You'll wind up having to pull the whole driveline and rebuild everything anyway. Even stuff like the soap grease in the window tracks hardens and so the doors have to be dismantled to re-grease the window mechanisms. Then you risk damaging brittle parts and don't get things put back exactly the way the factory did it. That's one of the obsessive-compulsive things that makes true collectors pay such exorbitant prices for low mileage is those little details such that no mechanic has ever had their paws on anything. Even the hose clamps are oriented exactly as Mr Nakamura, who worked nights at the factory, installed them. Once you start fixing things, it loses that originality.

To preserve originality, it needed to have been actually driven a few miles at least once a month on a regular basis since new. That's probably not what happened. More likely there was some incident that took out the owner and it may have been tied up in probate for decades while the family argued over who got what. But whatever reason, it probably racked up most of its few miles in a fairly short time and then sat unused for years. The new owner can either put it in a collection and brag about how original it is, or can sacrifice some of that originality with repairs and begin a regular driving regimen. Me, I'd at least want to be able to drive it to a car show once a month. Doesn't do anybody any good hiding in a private collection.
 
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