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Doesn't exist. There was a 5M and a 7M version of the kit. You can buy weld on AC fitting and have them welded to the 2JZ hard lines. Then have standard AC hoses made. The 5M side is standard Tube O fittings.
 

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Take your JZ compressor lines and your JK lines to a good AC shop, and they should be able to make you new hybrid lines on the spot, reusing the original fittings. I'd do it with the car there so you can fit them and get the clocking right before doing the final clamp on the fittings. We did this on Deanfun's 1jz 85 and it worked perfectly, I think they charged me like 40 bucks.
 

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You can also get adapter fittings for most Denso compressors with the dumb 'peanut' style fittings that will change them over to standard threaded AC lines. If you are careful these could exactly match the mk2 lines, or at least allow for some custom lines to be made.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Step one is done.
Got fittings that fit the compressor. Now need to decide how to connect to the rest of the system
@jdk_ii Jim King did a write up on his AC swap. Not sure if he still frequents the board anymore.
He mentioned something about gutting the EPR valve and using a Thermostatic switch or adjustable thermal relay which looks to be mounted to the dryer at the outlet of the evaporator. This is towards the end of the thread and I am not sure if it is as simple as buy part a and part b then connect or if there is more fine tuning than that. This is my first attempt at anything with an A/C system.

 

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I don't think those fittings will help you much. The forward fitting on the compressor points right at the PS pump. It was the same problem with those cast adapter blocks on the internet. They all point at something else in the car. That's why I modified the 2JZ hose ends.

And I still run the EPR on my car. Jim was using a thermostatic switch to cycle the compressor like most AC system. It's basically a temp switch in the evaporator housing that at near freezing cuts the circuit to the compressor.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It looks like I have a bit of room to make up my own end fittings. The plan is to put a shot 90 thread on then another 90 crimp on and possibly another 90 crimp or just bend the rubber to meet up and crimp on a straight splice to connect to stock rubber just under the battery area. I was looking to replace that line entirely but the end on the stock line is unique and I cannot find a suitable fitting to replace it. It is unique due to the length after the 90 degree bend to the threaded end.
I will take a shot at it and see what happens.
I did look at having the stock ends modified and I have yet to find a shop that will do it.
 

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Again, you don't need to replace the stock ends, nor reuse the original rubber line. Just nip the compressed crush sleave off carefully with a zip disc on a die grinder, then insert the original ends into a new hose at the AC shop and they should be able to use their crimpers to crimp on new crush sleaves. You're over complicating it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am having a hard time picturing this in my head.

I have called perhaps 7 AC/Mechanic shops in the area and no one is willing to make a custom line. This is what prompted me to DIY this whole thing. Only lines I have are stock lines and 2J compressor ends, no lines from the 2J.

So based on the wording I would use the stock ends and use new/2J rubber lines? Don't need to replace the stock ends = use stock ends; nor reuse the original rubber line = use new/2J rubber line?

The stock 2J lines at the condenser end are different than the stock ones. The best I can do is use the stock ends at the condenser side cut, braze and crimp to new lines then connect by cut, braze and crimp 2J compressor side. This would get me half way there since the stock 2J the hard lines off the compressor are pointed in less than optimal directions. The That area by my compressor is quite tight since the stock ECU box is there.

I do appreciate feedback. I haven't worked with AC systems before as likely demonstrated by over complicating it. I don't have the skills/equipment/shop needed to do a lot of things properly. I am more of a shade tree mechanic.
 

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I'll explain it again. The big difference for you at this point is you didn't get any 2j lines with your motor, so you bought these screw on ends. We had cut ones as it was a jdm motor from an importer, but it's not like it's hard to get used jz lines from an IS or such.

We started with the stock 5m lines, and a cut set of these...
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The ends on the left were cut off, but we didn't need them. See what the arrow is pointing at? That's the crush fitting I was referring to. If you nip those off with a zip disc carefully, you can slide the end out of the hose. Do the same on the 5m hoses for the opposite end. Take the car with the 4 ends to any AC shop that has the ability to crimp custom AC lines.... don't explain on the phone what you're trying to do, just ask if they can make custom lines on the spot. Get them to cut you new hose longer then you need off the roll, they have a standard diameter that works on our JDM fittings. Then plug the old fittings in on both ends and start trying to narrow down the hose length and fitting clocking that will work, testing on the car. The fittings plug in tight so this isn't too hard to do without losing your alignment. Hand the new hose with your fittings plugged in and carefully aligned and ask the AC guys to crimp them on with new crush sleaves. It's actually easier to get them to crush one end first before you do the fitting and sizing.
 

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I just read through all this. This has been so helpful. I'm doing a jz swap and been wondering about all this.

Where do I get new air conditioning bits?

Condenser, lines, evaporator, blower motor, heater core, and how much freon will the system hold?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Condenser is now unobtanium. Used is your only option.
Soft lines is from any A/C place #8 and #10. Hard lines are going to be used. I have a spare set of most hard lines, The long one in front of the condenser and the ones that go to the drier.
Blower Motor are available new from parts stores
Heater core you can still get new
Freon. R-134a is ~19-20 oz

If you look at my build thread I sum up what I did.
 
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