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Discussion Starter #1
Raj brought up the subject about 7 yrs ago: http://www.celicasupra.com/forums/showthread.php?21631-3D-printing

...the technology is now here. I have have access to Dalhousie's university 3D printer, especially now while school is out of session.

[video]http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2013/02/15/ns-3d-printer-dalhousie.html[/video]

The printer in the video is last year's model, they now have a larger format 3D printer. If any CAD guru's are up to vector designing a set of whiskers in AutoCAD or Rhino3D, we can print them.

Note: the CAD file ought to be exported to STL (stereolithographic file format). If your program does not allow export, you can convert using MeshLab freeware.

I'm not trying to make any money from the project, I just think this would be an interesting prototype.
 

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If you can find a resin that is resistant to UV and temperature, and have some sort of decent lifespan, then you might be onto something.

Sent from my DROID3 using Tapatalk 2
 

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Great idea! I've purchased castings using this technology.
The coating probably work or maybe you could "print" a whisker and then use it to make a mold for new ones?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This material can be painted or sealed. I had also thought it would be good for a mold, since I wouldn't want to put a good set of whiskers down for that.

They use both hard and soft PLA filament, available in green, black, orange, yellow, natural, white and blue (glow in the dark). It may not be as durable, but for public safety doesn't emit fumes like ABS.

Here is a good article describing the various properties of the filament types currently used: http://3dprintingforbeginners.com/filamentprimer/
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Perhaps a chance to preserve a precious piece of MkII history, I asked about using their 3D scanner, but it's currently in use by the ROM for virtual artifact curation. The virtual curation project will enable researchers to access digital data files that allow full 3D observation and manipulation of an artifact.:cool:

A difficulty for 3D scanning/printing is the overhang, or dip on the whisker. It could be filled for structural support and then drilled for plastic rivets. The material is prone to delamination, which would likely happen with engine heat over time. They could be wrapped, or when the technology becomes mainstream, they can be reprinted again.

A 3D scanned image does not have the same resolution as a CAD design, and although the whiskers are within the perimeter of this particular scanner's print field, the closer to the edges you go, the greater the loss of resolution. Preserving pieces in digital form...sticky.
 

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I think I've seen a guy use this technology to print gun parts and it actually worked and fired a bullet. Pretty crazy stuff, imagine being able to print out a rifle and just go and buy some bullets from the store.
 

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This technology will revolutionize automobile restoration. Jay Leno had the resources years ago but now its getting into the price range of the ordinary man. Still not as cheap as Taiwanese reproductions, but cheap enough. Patch up your broken part as good as you can, glue it together or whatever. Scan it with a 3D scanner. Edit out the damage and blemishes. Print and test-fit a new part, edit and do over again till its perfect. If the original part was metal, email the file to a CNC machine shop. If it was some kind of plastic or rubber, reverse your drawing and print out a mold that you can use to cast an appropriate resin. I'm seriously thinking of getting one of those $1200 machines just to start tinkering with.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
^ Agreed, I started 3D modelling back in 1980 when we still had to use punch cards (talk about a PITA). Scanning would seem to be easier, but one still has to be able to fix the glitches. They're down to about $3k now.

(kinda dates me, eh?)
One class' print run took the entire university computer mainframe, lol.

Actually the modelling programs haven't come as far as I thought they would in those 30 years (remember Star Wars came out in 1977 with a 3D hologram), yet I can def. see alot of potential for this 3D printing technology in everday application.
 

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3D printing is now being used to make prosthetic body parts such as ears and may even be used for making organs someday.
The stocks of these companies have moved up a lot but should we get a nice correction in the overall market then investing in companies like SSYS,DDD,PRLB would make buying Supra parts easier lol
 

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You can now buy a 3D printer off of Amazon. I'm trying to convince my boss the advantages of having one for making replacement plastic parts at work. Try finding some replacement trim pieces for a 1963 Land Rover... I can't remember the name of the company but there's one printer that's like $400. It's like IKEA and you have to assemble it yourself, but all the parts are there. I want one just for me at home.
 

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I read about some of those DIY printers a year or two ago. They look like something made from the erector set I played with as a child. There's now a tabletop commercial model called The Cube that does up to 5" square sold by Staples for $1200 and of course larger sizes cost increase from there. There's also DIY 3D scanners but affordable commercial models will be on store shelves very soon. For $2000, you could set yourself up to be able to make small plastic parts. But I'm sure the business model will be the same as inkjet printers. They'll sell you the printer pretty cheap and make their money raping you over the consumables. Probably won't get very many whiskers out of a $50 cartridge.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
About 20 years ago I was married and working for a small company in Finland, called Nokia. They were innovators, poised to to take center stage with their new GSM cellphone. At the time I was too involved in my own cutting-edge project, otherwise I would've jumped on the opportunity, but needless to say after rubbing shoulders with the Finns, I was impressed with this small, highly educated population with well-managed natural resources and co-operative, experimental approach to technological developments.

Cellulose R&D:

http://phys.org/news/2015-06-cellulose-supermaterial-future.html#inlRlv

Full .pdf document: http://www.vttresearch.com/Documents/news/DWoC1_final_presentation.pdf

They also share a passion for motorsports, especially F1, rally and ice racing.
 

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Upper/side dash and mid- dash outer vents.Who has a doner?
Chrome would look cool.Plastic chrome paint?Plastic chrome plating?
If I removed them,they would crumble,straight away.
Windshield washer nozzles:Black.
Injector/sensor connectors:Yellow.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I just ordered an SLA 3D printer and laser scanner with a multiple selection of UV curable colours. We'll see what I can pull off this winter :cool:
 

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What scanner did you order? In my limited research, the scanner technology has sort of been the weak link with consumer grade equipment resolutions far less than the consumer grade printer capabilities. Falling back on diskoelks post about solid modeling software not being quite so easy as it looks means I can't yet buy this stuff and expect to be able to simply glue a broken part back together, scan it and print a copy with minimal editing. With the prices now down to reasonable, I'd like to buy some of this stuff and try to reproduce some parts on my own, but I keep thinking I'd be too busy to learn the software.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
There's so many to choose from nowadays, I went with the MakerBot Replicator 5th gen for ease of support, and the fact it's sealed. It's still a fairly small platform, but actually a step up from what we had at the university I last worked. I too didn't want to get bogged down in the modelling details, so I complimented it with Digitizer 3D scanner ...from reviews it's basically idiot proof. :rolleye:



 
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