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I went with a Sigmax R19, it'll run any filament I want. If I decide to move away from FDM for production parts, I can use printed replicas for casting molds.

Long weekend of room prep, setup and calibration. Test prints came out great. This machine is no toy, but it's damn fun.
 

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Sunroof cable attachment thingies? (my technical term) Rear shock tower caps? Side mirror triangles (with tweeter pods), clip that go over the seat rail bolts...
 

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I'm making a list, I'm checking it twice...:)

Your suggestions are all very doable. I haven't opened my sunroof (inoperable) so don't know what that part actually looks like but it can't be our of reach for me. I can do entire freakin' side mirrors.

Keep in mind I can also do similar to that Land Cruiser dude, and model up mods to parts for, say, different tweeter housings, boost gauges, etc etc. We'll get to that later.
 

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I'll be anxious to see what you come up with. I've toyed with the idea of getting one of these things too as I think there is a lot of potential to recreate many obsolete car parts. I bought a Smithy 3-in-1 machine years ago and I'm frequently "making" some kind of simple part like a bushing or some special tool. The only thing that really keeps me from buying a 3-d printer is that I don't have the computer drafting skills. I'd really be starting from scratch to learn. Part of me just says hold off till I retire and have seven days a week to tinker with it and by then, the technology will be that much better and simpler. I just hope I still have enough brain cells left by then to even load a spool of filament. ;)
 

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I do architecture for a living. Can't say I'm licensed - that's my boss - but I work directly under a licensed architect. Drafting and 3D modeling are already a big part of my bread and butter.

I hit some snags on the weekend of setup, had to chase electrical demons out of the room I'm using. My house is 1963 original so it has it's quirks which, per Murphy's Law, only show up when you are least prepared for them. I got it sorted out and only got shocked once. Never tasted a 9V battery without sticking my tongue on one before :)

I acquired an 86 4runner that's gonna join in the fun as well. Between that, my beloved 89 pickup and the Supra, I'm gonna be a busy dude.
 

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I took today off work for personal reasons but managed to get the scanner up and running. Initial test scans of an 82 5MGE AFM look promising, while admittedly unnecessary since I could literally measure by hand or model over a scaled photo in less time. But, it's a handy test subject for my 5MGE-to-22RE AFM adapter plate I'm making.

It's definitely going to be a huge aid when I get into detailed and curving interior bits. The rework in the model ought to be fairly minimal once I get this machine singing.
 

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First prototype run of my AFM adapter. Made a couple design mods after test fitting, tweaked a couple printer settings for higher speed and more material.
This is a whole lot of fun. The production level parts will have a much nicer finish than this.


Heading on a ski trip over the holidays. Have fun out there y'all, I'll be back next weekend and I've got Supra parts in my sights.
 

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Took a few tries but I got it sorted. Time to test it in use and then up the print quality.
More of a pickup/4runner thing, but still fun. It uses one Supra part ;)

 

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I swear the turn of the year brings inevitable disaster to my part of the world.
Spent the weekend (since Thursday evening really) dealing with my now-dead furnace.

I'm gonna put in something like an air-water intercooler plus VVT-i in my house, only in reverse, so it's kinda car related in the end.
 

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How do 3D print files work? Do you have to draw the whole thing up and then print, or can you use a 3D scanner to just scan and copy essentially?
 

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You have to have a full 3D model, which can start as a scan. This can be made with a number of modeling programs. Then you generate gcode from the model with another piece of software called a slicer which interprets the model into parameters that control all the relevant print settings such as extruder temperature, wall thickness, filament type and the tool path itself.

It is certainly not the magic process that some folks think, you need to be a good designer and technician to produce end user quality parts.
 

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Having been in design and CAD work for the past 20 years, I know what you're saying. I haven't done any 3D printing stuff, but I've gotten pretty good at designing parts for laser cutting. Seems like another good thing to learn though. Pretty sure I can convince boss-man to get a nice 3D printer since we've already got a separate copy/print shop. Business expense!
 

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I did a lot of architectural models in college using laser cut plywood and chipboard. I like the challenge/process of flattening your concept into 2D parts that assemble into 3D objects.

The size of bed and level of sophistication I want in a laser cutter makes for a really, really expensive option but I have a shop down the road from me with hardcore gear. Plus you have to evacuate fumes. It's a huge undertaking.
 

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The company that designs and manufactures the machine I bought started uploading to YouTube recently.
I guess it'll work for automotive applications...I guess. ;)

 

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I have been printing a few brackets for my 2JZ swap. Mainly to mount random things on the shock tower. Thing that kinda sucks is that there are no straight lines on the strut tower area so to get the bolt holes lined up and angles correct I am using iterative design. Print one and see where it needs to be adjusted then print again...rinse and repeat. Just doing PLA for prototyping but going to be PET-G when designs are finalized.
 

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I've been printing the whiskers, defrost vents, rear side marker vents, shock tower caps, and some clips here and there. Fun technology and I thoroughly enjoy doing it. The hardest part (for me) is the time to create the solid model correctly.
Scanners still have a long way to go for a home user. Some newer lower cost ones are coming out, but still have a lot of "noise" that needs to be processed out.
Always looking for more ideas to keep them running. ;)
 

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I dig that you did the whiskers in TPU. I have yet to dabble in flexibles but my setup will do them.

My buddy/business partner wants to try some TPU for fishing lures.
 
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