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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My A/C currently works, but the compressor is leaking purdy green dye, so I think it's time to revamp the system and need some help since I don't know enough about A/C systems.

The compressor has 134 fittings, so I'm guessing the seals have been replaced, but I'm not willing to take that gamble since I can't find any receipts stating such. The current plan is to replace seals through the system, the drier and the compressor with a Four Seasons 68302 compressor. What else should I replace while I'm in there? Expansion valve? The car has 80k miles and I'm pretty sure all A/C parts are original otherwise.
When I get the system evacuated, should I go ahead and flush it before removing/replacing parts and seals to get all of the old oil out? I'm contemplating just flushing, vacuuming and recharging it myself as I'm one of those that uses any excuse to purchase new tools.

Any insight is helpful here...
 

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My A/C currently works, but the compressor is leaking purdy green dye, so I think it's time to revamp the system and need some help since I don't know enough about A/C systems.

The compressor has 134 fittings, so I'm guessing the seals have been replaced, but I'm not willing to take that gamble since I can't find any receipts stating such. The current plan is to replace seals through the system, the drier and the compressor with a Four Seasons 68302 compressor. What else should I replace while I'm in there? Expansion valve? The car has 80k miles and I'm pretty sure all A/C parts are original otherwise.
When I get the system evacuated, should I go ahead and flush it before removing/replacing parts and seals to get all of the old oil out? I'm contemplating just flushing, vacuuming and recharging it myself as I'm one of those that uses any excuse to purchase new tools.

Any insight is helpful here...
I had my compressor replaced a few years back and charged with R12 (I think that's the original). About 5 years ago, I took the chance and had the refrigerant changed to R134a. Probably had the drier replaced and flushed. Except for some small leaks, it works like a champ. Our cars have a little fan in front of the condenser that helps during idling. Good luck! Mine blows cold, cold air on the new refrigerant using the original evaporator and condenser.
 

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I have read that the R-12 seals/O rings were not compatible with 134-A. Read all that you can and also use You Tube for tips on an A/C conversion.
I do have a 134-A bottle charger that I will never use. The oil is an important part of the conversion!
A/C is not really required in Seattle.

The BIG pusher fan is a recommended addition into your system!!!!!! The little WEENIE fan is quite lame. I bought a De Rail that kicks ass.$100. Use the same wiring .Same relay.

This photo is relevant.NC? REQUIRED!!!!
Big fan=good air flow in traffic. Be cool.
 

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I like the look of that BIG pusher fan!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
New compressor, drier and expansion valve should be here tomorrow. New O-rings and AC belt are already here, but I haven't ordered a flush kit, refrigerant or vacuum pump/AC kit yet. No rush since it doesn't look like the car will be leaving the garage anytime soon due to weather. I need to get the system evacuated before doing work on it and we're between ice storms with lots of rain otherwise. For obvious reasons, my car doesn't see rain, unless it's looking out the garage windows.
 

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Don't mess around, just get a 10" or 12" pusher fan to replace that little "fan". I used the same mounts as the little fan? No ,it is all a custom install. It is a squeeze, but it fits. I will also use it in stop and go traffic, but I have it manually wired into the A/C button. A/C compressor is long gone. So is the condenser. That is how the little fan is mounted to. The crap behind it was eye-opening. Leaves and dirt but not many pine needles. My Supra lives outside under a very large pin oak tree under a cheap-ass canopy that FAILED again in the recent snow storm. Dammit.

I needed more flow to the A/C vents, when it was working, so I added a one 12 V. squirrel-cage fan inside the out put vents. I just wired 'em into the fuse box heater fan 12 V. power. The only place it would fit is the one that would cool the family jewels.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've got some spare Flex-A-Lite fans from a previous Celica. I'll see how performance goes without the additional fan initially. My stock squirrel cage fan is quite strong still, so I'm not worried about moving air around inside the car, though I do like the idea of a nice draft "down there", haha.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
After a trip to the dealership yesterday, I think I've got all parts, tools, etc for doing the AC, but that never seems to work out in the end.

Again, this is a working (weak, but cool) system that's leaking pretty badly but was last recharged in 2019, so not horribly so. With my newfound UV flashlight, most all of the original compressor glows pretty neon. Otherwise, a little leakage is seen on a fitting in front of the condenser.


Basic plan of attack: Put a belt back on the compressor, attach the new gauge set to see if there's any charge remaining since I haven't used it in the past 6+ months.

If there's still pressure, I'll take it somewhere to get it reclaimed. If not, I'll open her up.

Remove piece by piece, and flush all lines until flush is clean.

Replace O-rings on reinstallation, with a little Nylog Blue as lube for good measure. A little Nylog on threaded pieces as well for a good seal.

Remove and replace the compressor. More Nylog with seals and threads there too.

Pull the dash/glovebox and get the evaporator out. Inspect with UV light for any leaks in this area. Flush it, and clean any debris around it so it's breathing well again.

Edit: While this is out, I plan on blowing some compressed air down the evaporator drain plug to make sure there's nothing blocking the line. Last thing I want is nasty smelling, wet carpet.

Assuming no leaks, new O-rings, new expansion valve and new pressure switch, along with more lubing/sealing.

Put it all back together with old drier still in place. Pull a vacuum on the system to check for leaks.
Assuming that's good, I'll replace the drier and seal it back up. Vacuum test again to make sure.

If we're good there, time to charge it up. I'm planning on distributing a little oil in each part (measuring as I go) so there's already some through the system before recharging. I'm also planning on manually turning the compressor a decent bit to distribute stuff before actually starting it up.

Currently planning on running ester oil w/ UV dye and Envirosafe Industrial 134a Replacement.
 

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I think that you have a GOOD plan!

As a reminder to all people who own a vehicle with A/C. It's important to use the A/c at least once a month to prevent the seals from drying out. Use in warm mode. Some cars automatically kick in the compressor during the defrost mode! You may be able to hear the compressor clutch engage.

One more tip:
In the warm weather when you are using your air conditioner, turn OFF the AC a few blocks from where you plan to park to help dry out the evaporator. A small trickle of water may appear under the car if you forget to do that little trick. That moisture in the evaporator will allow mold to grow and it does smell bad.

Who? wants a free bottle of R- 134-a. Local pick up in Seattle. PM if interested. You may need an adapter to make this work on your system. I won't give this to a ROOKIE.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Who in the heck puts only one R134a adapter on the compressor?? I'm looking at you Antwerpen Toyota. Now I assume this means I have 134 in the system and not 12, but who knows?



The good news is that I didn't need to know. After connecting the gauges, both read 0, so there wasn't anything in the system anyway.

Just in case, I donned some eye protection and gloves and cracked open one of the lines. Nope, nothing in there.

Removing the compressor was a quick process. 14mm sockets to loosen the AC belt idler and then remove the belt. Unplug the single wire on top. A 22mm wrench to loosen the high side port, a 27mm wrench to loosen the low side port and a 12mm ratcheting wrench to loosen the four mounting bolts. The top two bolts should be removed first (top or bottom access for these pretty easily. The bottom two bolts should be done last from underneath so that when you get the last one out, you're already under there to lower the compressor out. The compressor dropped right out of the bottom with little issue.



I'm pretty sure this is the original compressor as it came from the factory. Going through my stash of receipts, I see nothing about AC until the aforementioned recharge a few years ago by the previous owner.

Beyond that, I didn't have much time, so I just took pictures of all the lines, fittings and component brackets on the front of the car for reference later. I loosened a few more hoses in front of the condenser as well using the same 22mm and 27mm wrenches from the compressor uninstall. This whole thing will be done as I get a few minutes here and there. The car is mostly a garage queen now, so no rush.

Interesting tidbit: If you ever wonder about how thoroughly you wash your hands, use a UV flashlight on your hands after handling an AC compressor covered in leaking UV dye. I did a decent job washing, but missed one little spot near my wrist and in the corner of one fingernail. Second wash fixed that right up.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
(4) 6mm Allen heads to remove the ports from the compressor. They were too tight to break free with a standard Allen set, so I grabbed my 3/8" drive Allen set. The compressor is an ungainly, awkward shape to hold, so I put two 4" screws through the mounting holes and attached it to my workbench. Popped right out that way. It might've been easier to loosen these on the car, but my knuckles still have all of their skin, so this might've been the better option.





Looking inside the freshly removed ports left me relieved. Very clean. Clearly no sealant had been used in the system thankfully!

 
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