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Discussion Starter #41
14.4V is a bit on the high side but should be safe still. Closer to 15V and you've got problems. Does voltage drop at higher rpms with the same electrical load?
 

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will try with the headlamps ON this week-end.

not sure if doable, but will also see if I can change the regulator in place.
(have 2 alt in the parts bins)
 

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Just a quick question.

Supra has room for a huge battery by modern terms. I've been through the Motomaster "Use the recomended battery or else you can't get warrenty" once before and it crapped out in two years. The Pro rated warrenty means I got some tiny sum of $ and had to buy a new battery.

I bought a 1000+CCA Eliminator that fit perfectly for less then $110 and have used it for 5 years without any issue at all. On uber cold mornings where my battery is down 40% to 50% from the temperature, I'm still cranking easily.

QUESTION: Can an oversized battery dammage an electricial system in normal use?

(the only thing I can figure is it could overheat the starter if cranked for 15+ seconds ... but so could a stocker.)

My opinion is people should buy the most powerful battery that fits to get the most for thier $$$ in the long run. That way as the battery ages and it's output drops ... it's still better then a brand new battery.

Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Morgan, that's pretty much a band aid fix. I think the problem lies in the quality of the manufacture of the batteries your buying, a wiring issue, or theres a problem with the motor/EFI(it shouldn't take more than 2 or 3 attempts to start up, even cold).

Personally, I've got a Red Top(It was free, someone thought it was dead and it just needed to be charged) but I would have no fear in putting in a Normal 24F(or even a 34) with a sensible 4-500 CCA. A riding lawn mower battery or motorcycle battery is enough to start a 5 or 7M.
 

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Na, my car is fine ... It just gets F'ing cold around here and I get frusterated with brand new batteries that can barely turn over my car on a cold morning.

I still can't find anywhere that says too big is bad or can cause dammage.

I can get a "stock" CCA that half fills the origional batter space for $80....

OR I can get almost double the CCA and more importantly more physicial plate/electrolyte for more reserve capacity for $110.

I'll be replaceing El'Cheapo in 2-3 years the fist time it doesn't start my car on a cold morning ... where as for an extra $30 it will easily last 5+ years and the entire time perform better the El'Chepo when it was brand new.

I buy batteries based on the physical space availible and BIGGER IS ALWAYS BETTER!


Links and stuff just for referance ......

http://www.type2.com/library/electrip/batfaq.htm

One of the major manufacturers, Exide, publishes the following table:

Available Power ..... Temperature .......... Power Required
From Battery ...... degrees F ................. To Crank Engine

............100%..................80..................100%
.............65% .................32...................155%
.............40%..................0.....................210%
.............25% .............. -32.....................350%



http://www.batteryfaq.org/

7.8.3. For car batteries, select the battery with CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) that will meet (or just exceed the vehicle manufacturer's recommendation), or is best suited for the coldest temperatures encountered in your climate. This is because more CCA requires greater plate surface area and in order to fit more surface area in the same space, this means thinner plates. Thinner plates will normally cause shorter overall service life. Do not substitute CA (Cranking Performance Amps), MCA (Marine Cranking Amps), or HCA (Hot Cranking Amps) for CCA. In hot climates, buying batteries with double or triple your vehicle's cranking amp requirements is a waste of money. Unless starting batteries are used in extremely cold climates, increased CCA is required to crank a sluggish engine and the over come the inefficiency of a cold battery. James W. Douglas' recommendation in his February 2000 article, Battery Selection--A Consumers Guide, in The Battery Man magazine, is:

"The sleek, aerodynamic designs have low cooling airflow through the engine compartment and that small in stature battery with high cold crank [amps] will have many very thin lead plates just to get the necessary surface area to make that big cold crank number. It will have the lower volume of electrolyte to provide the cooling necessary for long life and the greater capacity to run the [electrical] systems on the car. All of those thin plates will corrode away and fail long before expected putting the high performance battery's life below that of the lower CCA rated battery with the lower cost. Your best rule-of-thumb is, if it meets the OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturers) recommendation, buy it. Look for the highest reserve capacity [RC] battery at the correct CCA (Cold Cranking Amps)."
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Sorry I didn't actually say it, but bigger is not going to hurt anything(unless the posts hit the hood and start welding!). Does the car go a few days between running in that cold? There could be a small drain that is magnified with extreme cold.
 

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Awsome. That's what I thought ... but never got a straight answer from anyone.
 
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