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Discussion Starter #1
I don't know how many of you have gone to this extent, but I've got the grill out and I'm trying to refresh it since the black plastic is a little faded. I've been using Meguiars PlastX with decent results, but getting inside these stupid hexagons is really hard.

I've tried everything I can think of using dremel or drill attachments, but any kind of rotary work misses the corners of each hexagon. I've tried Q-tips, flossing with cloth strips with a little PlastX, etc to no avail. The only things I've found that work are some dense foam hair rollers (stole from my wife, haha) since they have a nice stiff metal wire inside. I can lube with PlastX and work it back and forth to get rid of any oxidation and get a nice shine on all six sides. Each hole is time-consuming.

Unfortunately, there are a LOT of these stupid holes to polish, so I'm hoping someone has a better or quicker idea. Brainstorm?
 

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Interesting conundrum. I'm always trying to figure out how to fashion some sort of tool for a job but never considered this before. What I used to do is treat the grill with Mother's Back to Black before a car show. Or course it doesn't last very long.

You might search online for a "bottle brush" or more specifically "test tube cleaning brush". They make them with bristles, but there's also foam and absorbent woolen types. Would probably work better than the hair curlers.

This may sound kind of dangerous, but if you wanted to work considerably faster, maybe figure out how to mount the bottle brush on a reciprocating tool like a jigsaw or sawzall? Of course would want variable speed that can go slow enough not to get out of control and a perfect sized bottle brush. But then I have this old black and white film running in my head of three famous guys operating a rivet gun or jackhammer....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Your brain apparently works like mine, haha. I've tried a faucet cleaning brush (basically a more flexible bottle brush with a handle on each end to clean water faucets with a dental floss action), a toothbrush with bristles cut down some to fit within the little hexagons. Neither of those had any effect. I've tried thick pipe cleaners and cut-in-half Q-Tips, mounted in a drill. I've chucked up foam earplugs into the drill even (actually worked a little). I've tried Back to Black and even some silicone products, but none touched it. I keep staring at my sawsall though, knowing the reciprocating action is what I need. I just haven't figured out something soft and small enough to attach to it that can also withstand the pulling and pushing action.

Keep in mind, this car has less than 80k miles and has spent it's life in a garage, so the grill is in great shape, just not as pristine as I'd like.

So far, the things that have worked the best- The Dremel with a 1/4"D woolen polishing pad did a decent job on the flats of each hexagon, but did nothing for the corners. The Howard Leight foam earplugs did about the same as the Dremel, just got even less of the corners since they're a larger diameter. The flossing with micro-fiber strips does get into the corners, but after a few holes, you're worn out since it's slow. The hair rollers (not a usual type) really did work well since one of the various diameters fills the hexagon nicely. Action, the sawing action wears you out, but the results are by far the best.

Not at all what the earplug manufacturer intended:



Also, not what Unilever or the hair roller manufacturers had in mind:



Ignore the bit of dust, that's just debris from various attempts. You can clearly see the one that's done. That's the look I want for all of them! I just don't want to do the labor for that look...
 

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Yep, I get it. It does make an obvious improvement in appearance. I'll be anxious to replicate your results someday.

What about a coping saw? Maybe rig a spring-loaded hook on each end so you could attach a length of polishing material. It would at least provide a handle and make it less tiring work. But any flexible material would have to be secured at both ends.
 

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why not just cut a piece of foam to shape? Trimming one of those foam paint brushes to size would probably be the easiest solution. The proper way to keep it clean is to use a blow when you dry the car.
 

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Another difficult place to clean.****

The area just ahead of the door hinges,just behind the front tires.
Leaves,pine needles and mud collects in there and the last time I was in there,2 cups of crap was pulled out.
A bent up coat hanger works OK,using a flashlight attached magnetically.Be sure to clear out the drain holes on the pinch weld,especially the areas that got folded over by a mis-placed jack or hoist.
Using compressed air in that cavity make a hell of a mess.
Spray white primer in there?Hit it with a garden hose?Snake a skinny vacuum cleaner hose in there?A dryer vent cleaning brush?
I find oak leaves and maple "helicopters" in there.No pine trees nearby.
 

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If you have (a friend with) a 3D-printer, make a hexagon rod (with a tapered tip and a handle on the other end) a tad smaller than the holes, and fasten felt on the six sides. Then this work will be a breeze.. Of course you will have to do the smaller at the edges manually, or make another tool.
 
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