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Discussion Starter #1
I just recently put in a new clutch. Including the throw out bearing, pilot bearing, pressure plate, clutch disc, and flywheel. Since replacing those the clutch pedal goes to the floor. Sometimes it engages enough to shift other times it doesn't. When the clutch goes to the floor and doesn't engage the pedal stays on the floor. I have taken the slave cylinder off and cleaned it pretty good. And bled the system after reinstalling it. When I bled the system I opened the bleeder valve and dumped fluid in the reservoir until it ran out on the ground. then I closed the valve and topped off the reservoir. Pumping the pedal after that there was little to know change. Any thoughts?
 

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Attatch a clear pastic tube from the valve to the container.
Have some one pump the clutch a couple of times and then hold the clutch down. Open the valve about half a turn, till it stops flowing then close the valve. And repeat till no more air bubbles come out. Make sure the pedal is not released when the bleeder screw is open.

HTH, Laterz zankone
 

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You need to bleed the clutch just like bleeding a brake system...if you've ever done that before. Just lay under the car and have someone sit in it....pump the clutch a few times and make sure they continue to hold it down...open up the bleeder valve then tighten it. Make sure they pump it again 5 or 6 times and on the last pump hold it down. Open the bleeder valve again. Make sure the resevoir is full. And continue till the pressure on the clutch is back. If it is still not back you may have a internal leak in the slave cylinder or master cylinder...but that should fix your problem. One time my line came loose on the slave cylinder and i tightened it and rebled it just like that....all the fluid did empty from my master cylinder and after those steps it worked just fine. Hope that helps :multi:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'll take the bleeding into consideration...When I worked at the dealership we did it the way I did it all the time. I may not have stated that the clutch was acting funny even before I removed the slave cylinder. It was fine before I removed the transmission, thats what's throwing me off. But like I said I will try the bleeding it while pumping.

Yes I know the "real" way to bleed a brake/clutch system, but when you are by yourself you have to use the alternative method. Which is fill the reservoir, open the bleeder valve, watch for a steady streem of fluid, close the bleeder, fill the reservoir. And repeat a few time just to make sure. Actually works really well, had a few master mechanics show me that trick.
 

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You definetly have a hydraulic system problem. I would check up under the dash and see if the slave cylinder is leaking. The way your describing bleeding the brakes doesn't really sound like a good idea. You have to be careful because you can draw air back up thru the bleed screw which is contradictory to what you are trying to do. For do it yourself bleeding one of the Mityvac type bleeders are worth the money. I think they are only like $30 from Harbor Freight. You can make your own easily if you have a hand vacuum pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
SilverMk2 said:
You have to be careful because you can draw air back up thru the bleed screw which is contradictory to what you are trying to do.
Norbie said:
The above method won't clear air pockets caught in the master cylinder or slave cylinder, it will only clear bubbles caught in the hydraulic lines.

Norbie and SilverMk2 please don't take this the wrong way as I'm only asking, but If the fluid is on a continous drain, how can it draw air back up into the system? I can see where it may not get all the air out of the slave cylinder since it isn't fully "open". After utilizing the clutch over 10 times (5 stop signs at least plus some shifting while on the jack stands) why would the fluid level in the reservoir not go down? My theory is that at some point during the test drive the air would have to go somewhere.

I do apologize if this came across the wrong way, I'm just asking because of my theory as well as what I was taught by several master mechanics. I worked at a dealership for a little over 2 years as a toyota mechanic.
 

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As a totally opposite thought, when I did my clutch, after putting the tranny back up the clutch would not work properly. It turns out that the release fork had come off of the bearing inside the tranny somehow (those clips are not very tight). Try to move the end of the fork by hand and see if it is loose. Just a thought...


-Ken
 

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Discussion Starter #10
MK2Racer said:
As a totally opposite thought, when I did my clutch, after putting the tranny back up the clutch would not work properly. It turns out that the release fork had come off of the bearing inside the tranny somehow (those clips are not very tight). Try to move the end of the fork by hand and see if it is loose. Just a thought...


-Ken
I actually did that when I was reinstalling teh slave cylinder...it feels OK, but I cannot be sure...
 

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srider said:
Norbie and SilverMk2 please don't take this the wrong way as I'm only asking, but If the fluid is on a continous drain, how can it draw air back up into the system?
I'm talking about air which is already in the system and may be trapped in the master and/or slave cylinder. Bleeding the clutch line won't get rid of that air.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Norbie said:
srider said:
Norbie and SilverMk2 please don't take this the wrong way as I'm only asking, but If the fluid is on a continous drain, how can it draw air back up into the system?
I'm talking about air which is already in the system and may be trapped in the master and/or slave cylinder. Bleeding the clutch line won't get rid of that air.
OK gotcha, was going to do that tonight, wife was going to work the pedal for me, but it rained.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
OK I tried to bleed the clutch. pedal was pumped a few times then held on the floor, opened the bleeder valve and fluid shot out...no air. Pedal at that point stuck to the floor, was able to pump it a few more times, but each time after that the pedal would stay on the floor. Went ahead and opened the bleeder no fluid and no air. No noticeable amount of fluid gone out of the reservoir. I'm going to try again Wednesday. I did pump the pedal about 30 or more times after that, not pushing it all the way down. and it felt OK. I did take it for a short trip around the neighborhood. Seamed OK.
 

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It's normal for the pedal to stay on the floor; you have to physically pull it back up, and that's where it draws new fluid into the system (you'll see the reservoir level go down as you do this).

The preferred method for bleeding the clutch is to hold the clutch pedal all the way down, then get a friend to open the bleeder and allow the pressure on the clutch itself to push the fluid out. Then close the bleeder, lift the pedal, push it down and start again. Don't pump the pedal because this will make any air in the system form tiny bubbles which spread throughout the system and are harder to get out.
 

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Ok, here is what I do to bleed the clutch.

One person in car, one person under. Clear line attached to bleeder.

Open bleeder
press pedal down
close bleeder
bring pedal up
repeat that 5 or 6 times
with bleeder closed and pedal up pump pedal and see if it builds pressure
if it doesnt build pressure repeat stepst 1-4 5 more times
if it does build pressure
pump pedal 4 times, hold down
open bleeder (warning, projectile vomiting will occur from the bleeder!!!)
close bleeder bring pedal up
repeat that 4 times

You should no longer have air in your system.
BE SURE to keep an eye on your resivior and fill it up when it gets less than half full.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Norbie said:
It's normal for the pedal to stay on the floor; you have to physically pull it back up, and that's where it draws new fluid into the system (you'll see the reservoir level go down as you do this).

The preferred method for bleeding the clutch is to hold the clutch pedal all the way down, then get a friend to open the bleeder and allow the pressure on the clutch itself to push the fluid out. Then close the bleeder, lift the pedal, push it down and start again. Don't pump the pedal because this will make any air in the system form tiny bubbles which spread throughout the system and are harder to get out.
OK, I have never had this trouble before, it is throwing me way off. As with brakes don't most people pump the pedal about 3 times then hold the pedal down then open the bleeder? I will try agian on Wednesday. I only pumped with the bleeder closed. (just incase it was thought that I pumped with the bleeder opened) This car for some reason has me so flustered and frustrated I can't do the "easy" stuff....
 

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Discussion Starter #17
An update. I

I was finally able to bleed the clutch some more. Same problem I bleed it, it feels pretty good. I take it for a test drive and i get down the street and it sticks to the floor again. No visible fluid loss. Seams to only go to the floor after the engine gets warm.

Any other suggestions?
 
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