Toyota Celica Supra Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am interseted in the Egr Block off. I live in South Carolina and do not have to worry about emissions. What is gained from bypassing the emission gas recirculation ?and is there a place where I can purchase the block off plates. Anything else need to be done other that just blocking off the holes.

Just Curious,

Mitch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
Theres nothing to be gained as far as performance since the EGR closes at wide open throttle anyway. It just cleans up the engine bay since you can remove it and get rid of all the lines and such that are associated with it. I just made my own block off plates with some aluminum bar stock that I got at the hardware store.
 

·
Founding Member
Joined
·
6,424 Posts
Not much can be gained. The EGR valve remains closed at idle and at wot and only opens during part throttle operation. Look inside the TB, at the top see a couple of tiny holes not very far apart. These lead to the vacuum connections that control the EGR. Valve opens only when the butterfly is positioned between the two vacuum ports, for instance when you're rolling at a steady 25mph on the emissions dyno. When accelerating hard, the valve is closed. If you want to test yourself, disconnect and plug the vacuum line at the EGR so it won't open at all and see if you like it any better. To make the experiment valid however, first make sure you're EGR system is working properly. A vacuum gauge connected at the EGR valve should show zero at idle, jump to 10 or so under normal acceleration up to cruising speed and should snap back to zero if you floor it or lift. If not, there is a problem in any of several vacuum components. Second, a vacuum pump drawn on the valve itself should cause the engine to stumble while at idle speed. If not, the EGR tube is blocked or the valve is not operational. Its pretty common that the EGR system becomes plugged up with soote over the years so your EGR system may have already disabled itself thereby saving you the trouble. :wink:

Phil D.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
pdupler said:
Not much can be gained. The EGR valve remains closed at idle and at wot and only opens during part throttle operation. Look inside the TB, at the top see a couple of tiny holes not very far apart. These lead to the vacuum connections that control the EGR. Valve opens only when the butterfly is positioned between the two vacuum ports, for instance when you're rolling at a steady 25mph on the emissions dyno. When accelerating hard, the valve is closed. If you want to test yourself, disconnect and plug the vacuum line at the EGR so it won't open at all and see if you like it any better. To make the experiment valid however, first make sure you're EGR system is working properly. A vacuum gauge connected at the EGR valve should show zero at idle, jump to 10 or so under normal acceleration up to cruising speed and should snap back to zero if you floor it or lift. If not, there is a problem in any of several vacuum components. Second, a vacuum pump drawn on the valve itself should cause the engine to stumble while at idle speed. If not, the EGR tube is blocked or the valve is not operational. Its pretty common that the EGR system becomes plugged up with soote over the years so your EGR system may have already disabled itself thereby saving you the trouble. :wink:

Phil D.

my mechanic had to jury rig my '82 to get it to pass smog a few years back. basically, the egr was on at idle speed which caused a rough idle. he put a ball bearing in the vacuum line to look normal, but the egr was bypassed. he engaged it manually to pass the test.

i would like to solve this problem myself (he's no longer my mechanic). what areas do you think i should concentrate on?

thanks :!:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,374 Posts
The EGR system has been known to cause failure in the #6 cylinder on the MKIV, of course the 2JZ-GTE operates at a much higher temp. than the 5M. It is, however, a possibility that the hot gasses, over time, could cause excessive heat wear to one or two cylinders of any engine. Blocking the EGR will simply eliminate the intrusion of spent gasses into the clean air and drop the operating temps, though it's so minimal that you'll never notice. Just something to make the engine a little more happy and content.

Got my toes in my hand, got a drink in the sand.
Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,457 Posts
my mechanic had to jury rig my '82 to get it to pass smog a few years back. basically, the egr was on at idle speed which caused a rough idle. he put a ball bearing in the vacuum line to look normal, but the egr was bypassed. he engaged it manually to pass the test.

i would like to solve this problem myself (he's no longer my mechanic). what areas do you think i should concentrate on?
Well, if you plugged the line and it shut off, the valve itself should be fine. For some reason you're getting vacuum with the throttle closed. Make sure the egr vacuum line is plugged into the proper port on the TB. It should be coming off of the nipple on the TB which is closest to the front of the engine. It should run to the black BVSV on the thermo housing. From there one hose should run to the vacuum modulator.

If your hoses are correct, then maybe your idle has been adjusted with the stop screw instead of the idle screw. This would cause your throttle plate to be more open than normal, letting the egr nipple get vacuum when it shouldn't. If this is the case, let off on the stop screw and open up your idle adjustment to compensate.

Christian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
good advice christian. i'll check all those things.

thanks for the post :!:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
engine swap/350 chevy?

Hey while I was at work yesterday, I asked a friend to show me where to add the freon to the car? When he took a look and told me I should put a 350 or 400 chevy engine in it. It got enough room for it. He said I should get rit of all the wires and the injection and use the carberator.
Has anyone done this before or any idea in advantage and disadvantage?
thanks!
 

·
POTATO
Joined
·
17,259 Posts
I'm sure it's prolly been done, but not many write ups on it I don't believe. I've thought about it a lot, we were going to install a 350 into my Blupra parts car until we learned the 350 had head problems and we scrapped the project. I believe it would be a serious project, making the whole drive-line fit right and what not, it would take time and money for sure ;)
And not wanting to start an argument, but I do believe fuel injection is more efficent than carb, not that I wouldn't want to lose some of the electrical crap we have now. I am just thankful that mk2 Supras are "simple EFI", we have FAR less computer crap on our cars than these new junkers, LOL :p
 

·
Founding Member
Joined
·
6,424 Posts
Have seen a small block chevy in a 1982 Supra before. Fitment issues required a dry sump system and modifications to the steering rack to clear the exhaust manifold which resulted in some handling issues that the owner couldn't use it for racing as he'd planned. As to whether or not its worth all the hassle, most on this forum will tell you its not. The particular one I've seen is sitting in a warehouse in Dallas where its not moved since it was converted in 1984. Owner is a friend of a friend of mine and considers it a failed experiment and moved on to other projects. He keeps it thinking he might use the engine and tranny for something else someday. Chassis has 17,000 miles on it but so much is hacked and the original driveline is long gone so it'll likely never see the street again. I offered to buy it for parts, sans driveline, but the owner seems to think the chassis is still worth something because of the low mileage. Oh well....

Phil D.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top