Toyota Celica Supra Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,604 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am thinking about installing an engine oil heater this winter. I have listed a few of the benefits below. Its just a small patch you attach to the bottom of your oil pan. Has anyone else tried this?

1. Faster/easier engine cranking in cold weather
2. Helps reduce engine wear with easy flow of engine oil
3. Immediate engine oil pressure
4. Easy installation
5. Most efficient means of heat transfer available (heat rises)
6. No cutting hoses, removing frost plugs, or loss of anti-freeze
7. No danger of oil carbonization
8. Permanent. Once applied, unit need not be removed




3 Steps to install:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
655 Posts
re: Oil Heater

There is another type I saw just last week (two sizes available). Basically it was rectangular in shape, sorta like the one pictured above, but alot thicker, several inches at least. The bottom of the unit was magnetic, so it would easly stick to the oil pan (or transmission housing, engine block etc.....as long as it was steel) and had a handle on it for placement or removal (picture a small rectangular frying pan.....). Looked pretty cool. I saw it at Canadian Tire (US equivalent of a PEP Boys). Retailed between $40-$60 CAN depending on which version you got. Think I may end up getting one too.

Sonny

P.S. Other advantage, for the guys with the higher output engines that want to use thicker oil all the time (even in cold temperatures). Using one of these babies would make it easier for the engine to start, helping to minimize wear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,604 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The unit I described above, is very thin, about $45-65, and is supposed to be much more energy efficient than the magnet heaters. I would be worried about scraping the ground with anything too thick.

My car usually scrapes the driveway if I am carrying any extra weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,297 Posts
I remember seeing a deal in the back of Motor Trend or Road and Track, and it was like a heating element that slides into the dipstick tube, and warms the engine oil in the pan. It was a rod with an electric wire connected to it...pretty slick design..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,604 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, I finally purchased the heater and installed it. Unfortunately, our oil pans are not perfect for this product. The instructions describe how you must have a completly flat surface with no bumps, ridges, part numbers, etc...

I applied it as good as possible, but only 50% of the patch is in contact with the oil pan. Therefore I am not generating quite enough heat, but its better than nothing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Oil pressure

Bill,
Do you have an aftermarket oil pressure gauge? If so, did using the heater change the oil pressure on cold start?

Donnie Jue
1982 7M-GTE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,604 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No, I only have the stock oil pressure guage. The pressure will spike at startup, then gradually come down as the engine warms up. I have noticed a slight difference on cold mornings, the oil pressure will come down quicker than usual.

I'm sure it would work better if we had a flat surface to work with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,800 Posts
I applied it as good as possible, but only 50% of the patch is in contact with the oil pan. Therefore I am not generating quite enough heat, but its better than nothing!
u need thermally conductive epoxy. look here
www.masterbond.com there's others too.
have fun
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I cannot comment on the effectiveness of these devices on cars, but I HAVE used them on work trucks. Quite frankly, they do not cut it when the temp drops to -10 C or more. On a car it may be a different story, but when I encountered them they were essentially useless to us.
However, I should point out that when it was used in conjunction with a conventional block heater, the external oil pan element seemed to provide noticable benefits (IE oil pressure built up quicker). The problem appeared to be with the amount of current the thin pad could carry; the oil pan element was rated at a mere 200 watts, whereas the block heater was a more reasonable 650 watts. If the oil pan heater could be made in a higher wattage form, I have no doubt that it would be a superior method of warming an engine.

I don't know if this is of any value to you, it is just my two cents. I hope it helps.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top