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new method of removing cam pully bolts;
after the plastic shroud is removed, have two to four wooden shims cut. they should look like door stops, but 3-4 inches long and about an inch wide by a half inch thick. the goal is to squeeze them between the cam pully and the lip of the aluminum rear cam cover part. Put the wedges so the pointed end points in the direction that you are turning the bolt with a 26 or whatever the pully bolt is[loosening/tightening]. as you bring torque on the bolt, the wedge gets tighter. for assembly, just put the wedge on the other side [other direction]. This does not damage timing belts or anything else I am still running on the belt i did this on. I used pine for the shims no hard woods like black locust guys! oak should be fine too. This works best with the belt on but I think it also worked fine without it. ps. if you have bought a special tool to hold the cam pullys from moving, pls use it. This is very easy and I recommend it. reason i posted is you don't have to stuff things in your cylinders at all. I did this on a 5mge.
 

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Cam holes? I think he meant just use a proper 26mm wrench on the cams with the valve covers off and its easy as pie to remove the cam gears. You want to remove the timing belt first though.

Good thread, but I have some suggestions for some of your tips, and I've got a few tips of my own.

williamb82 said:
CRANK PULLEY BOLT REMOVAL!

best way to remove or tighten that bolt(no nics on the inside of the block or on the rod, etc..)

step 1: remove the timing belt from the cam gears, then line the cams up so the intake and exhaust valves are closed on the #1 cylinder.

step 2: turn the crank ~1/3 turn clockwise past tdc for #1 piston.

step 3: remove the #1 sparkplug.

step 4: use some stereo power cable thats insulated. i used 8 or 10 awg. and slide ~6-12in or so in the cylinder

step 5: then turn the crank back counter clockwise. it locks the motor.

step 6: use a breaker bar and 6 point 19mm socket to break it loose.

for tightening, same thing, but turn counter clockwise first, then clockwise to lock it. then use a tq wrench set to the correct tq. 6m/7m is 195ft/lbs and 5m is 168lbs/ft iirc
You were the one who suggested this method many many years ago and I've used it to much success ever since. Thanks Will! But I highly recomend not using speaker wire. Your risking some of the copper braid coming off in the cylinder. Just use rope, it works great and can't damage anything. I just use normal yellow nylon rope.

Now this method requires a BIG word of caution, I would not recomend using it on other kinds of motors! I tried it on a honda d15 once and I swear to god it destroyed the rod bearing on the #1 cyinder. It didn't matter how much rope we put in, it just kept slipping over TDC when we tried to remove the bolt. Then when we put it back together, the motor had rod knock! Your putting a huge amount of pressure on the #1 rod when you do this method. Not all motors are as overbuilt as the M series, I wouldn't chance this on a weaker motor, you've been warned!


williamb82 said:
PILOT BEARING REMOVAL!

this will work for w58 or r154. same pilot bearing. 5m,6m, or 7m.

step 1: get a couple paper towels and a cup of water and a stock headbolt or an aftermarket bolt the same size. i have several stock headbolts and they fit in the pilot hole perfect. a flat head screwdriver and a hammer!

step 2. tear off pieces of paper towel about 1.5in square.

step 3. dip the pieces 1 at a time in the cup of water and then stick them in the pilot hole. repeat till you cant force any more in there.

step 4. take the headbolt and put it in the hole and tap wit hthe hammer easily till it touches the crank inside. then remove it.

step 5. repeat step 3 and 4 until it is packed so tight that you have to hit the bolt wit hthe hammer hard for it to push the bolt in. at this point you will notice the bearing starting to push out. each time the bolt bottoms out remove it and pack more wet paper towels in the hole untill the pilot bearing pops all the way out.

step 6. use a flat head screwdriver to remove the large chunck of wet paper towels and your done. just a lil water to wipe off. no greasey mess like the haynes ends up causing you.
Yeah that sounds kinda finicky. I've tried the old grease behind the pilot bearing trick which this is a slight variation of, and its never worked for me. I would recomend just get the proper tool or take the 15 minutes it takes to make one. I did that years ago and its worked every time on the first try ever since. Here's a pic...



The tool is essentially an "n" shaped bracket (made of really thick steel, use thicker then I did and you won't need the extra piece on the top of mine or the hose clamp to reinforce it) with a hole on the top for a long bolt. Use a bolt with alot of thread on it and then shave the head of the bolt down so it will just fit through the pilot bearing center, hook it on the bearing then tighten up a nut on the other end of the bolt and she comes out right away every time.


williamb82 said:
HOW TO HAVE A TIGHT LEAK FREE OILPAN!

this assumes youve already scrapped all old sealant off the pan and block

step 1: grab a can of acetone, some clean rags and a tube of ultra gray sealant. also some glaves wont hurt.

step 2: pour some acetone onto a clean rag and wipe the block mating surface and pan mating surface clean. the acetone will remove any oil or grease residue and dry instantly with no residue at all. might want to wear gloves so that acetone doesnt dry out your hands.

step 3: put a nice even bead around the entire block if you have the engine on a stand and upside down, or on the pan if the engine is in the car. ive found 1 full tube is usually used for the pan itself.

step 4: place the pan directly onto the block, do not allow it to slide around as this will damage the bead of sealant you have put down.

step 5: install all the bolts and tighten properly.

once the sealer has dried you could remove the bolts and the pan wont come off. lol. when it ever needs removed it will have to be "persueded" to do so as this gives a VERY good seal and bonds very well once its been heatcycled a few times.
Thats pretty much FSRM method. As Shawn said, thats how you're supposed to install the later oil pans. I'm guessing the earlier ones don't have the recesses for the RTV. Upgrade to a later pan, cork oil pan gaskets are stupid.


williamb82 said:
BEST HG SEAL POSSIBLE!

step 1: you need your hg, a tube of ultra gray, some clean rags, and a can of acetone. also the proper socket and extension and a GOOD tq wrench!!!

step 1. pour some acetone on a clean rag and clean the head and block surface very thouroughly. it will dry leaving no residue at all.

step 2: put a tiny bead of ultra gray at the 2 spots where the front timing cover attaches to the block. DO NOT PUT A HUGE BEAD!!!!!!!!!! just a small one and may even want to smear it with your finger slightly.

step 3: place the hg on the block being sure it is seated over the dowel pins properly

step 4: install the head. get help if possible as you want to set it straight down and not slide it on the gasket at all. easier when you have a competent helper.

step 5: install the bolts or head studs and make all finger tight.

step 6: tq the bolts in the proper sequence to the proper spec in 3 even passes. i use 90lbs with head studs and lube on them. so i go 30, 60, then 90. with headbolts i go to 75 in 25, 50, 75 sequence.
Thats also pretty much the factory method except for the torque spec at the end. I use 70ft/lbs on stock bolts and havn't had a problem, but seriously the best seal possible would be to deck everything and then go metal. The stock HG is serious fail no matter what you do, its just a shitty shitty design.



williamb82 said:
HOW TO SEAL THIN PAPER GASKETS!

this is for any small paper gasket, like the diff cover, or the timing cover for the block and thermostat housing and other misc paper gaskets.

step 1: you need some clean rags, can of acetone, and a tube of ultra gray sealant.

step 2: pour some acetone on a clean rag and wipe the mating surfaces of the parts that are going together clean.

step 3. put a dab of the ulta gray on your thumb and forefinger and rub together and then rub it on the paper gasket working your way around the entire gasket. when done both sides of the gasket should have a thin coating of the ultra gray that will not squish out when the parts are bolted together.

step 4: place the gasket on the part and put the part on with the correct bolts. this works goof on the timing covers on the 7m and especially the upper 5m timing cover!
I prefer spray on gasket sealer. This stuff...

works really good. I like the spray stuff, its less messy then fiddling around with RTV and its easier to clean off the part then RTV the next time the thing is apart.

williamb82 said:
HOW TO KEEP ROCKERS IN PLACE WHEN INSTALLIBNG CAMS!

this is a easy headache releiver. may sound like common sense but lots of people have asked how to do this. lol.

step 1: you need a tub of wheel bearing grease, preferably synthetic, and some rags to clean your hands.

step 2: put a dab of wheel bearing grease on the top of the hydralic lash adjuster and on the top of the valve stem with your finger. use a fair amount.

step 3: place the correct rocker on each assembly. then use the rags to wipe your hands clean of the grease.

step 4: install the cam tower on the cylinder head whiel the greas holds the rockers from being bumped off so easy.
Good tip, but I do not recomend using wheel bearing grease. It won't get washed off by regular oil easily. You need a steady supply of oil on the tops of the lash adjusters so they don't wear out. Use assembly lube, its nice and thick, it keeps the rockers on nicely and its actually designed to go inside your engine. A couple minutes of running and its diluted into the oil (which is why your supposed to change your oil after your first warm up on a fresh motor, to get all of the assembly lube out of it).

williamb82 said:
LEAK FREE EXHAUST MANIFOLD GASKET!

this is the method i use and never have a leaking exhaust manifld gasket.

step 1: you need the gasket and a tube of ultra gray and some rags.

step 2. put a decent bead around each port on the gasket wit hthe ultra gray on both sides. dont use too much. use your finger to smooth it out slightly.

step 3: place the gasket over the studs on the head and use the rags to clean the sealer off your hands

step 4: install the exhaust manifold/header and tw the nuts to spec. it is recomended to only use the stock nuts as aftermarket nuts do not distribute the tq correctly and tend to cause the studs to strip the head even when tqed to the proper amount.

when the engine is started up for the first time there will be some smoke emmiting from the gasket area for a couple min. but it only does this the once. after that its fine.
I agree with the helicoiling. Do it ASAP, just don't fuck it up. I don't know about using RTV on the exh manifold though. Never tried it, but even the black stuff isn't rated anywhere near the heat ranges the exhaust sees. Actually the red RTV is the high temp stuff, but even it isn't rated high enough for exhaust components.

Here's a couple for the thread...

HOW TO REMOVE THE STARTER ON A CELICA SUPRA
1. Get a buddy, this is best done as a two man job.
2. Get one guy on top of the motor, using two box end wrenchs to lock the nuts on the bell housing side.
3. Get the 2nd guy under the motor with a 14mm rachet wrench to undo the bolts from the starter side.

Thats about it, goes pretty easily then, just don't forget to disconnect the battery first and to remove the high current wire that attaches to the starter. That sucker isn't fused and will weld your wrench to the car if it touchs it.

HOW TO REMOVE THE STOCK FUEL FILTER
1. Do not loosen the bracket bolts till the fuel line bolts have been cracked. Just use a rachet with a bunch of long extensions and possibly one flex knuckle so you can get the top bolt from above, and the bottom one from below.
2. Once the fuel bolts are cracked, then you can reach in there and unthread them and undo the bracket that holds the filter in. This bracket can be lossened by a 10mm bolt on the side, but sometimes its easier to just unbolt the bracket from the motor.

Next time the motor is out, relocated the fuel filter to the strut tower. Check out my write up on it here...
http://forums.celicasupra.com/showthread.php?t=27075&highlight=fuel+filter
 

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I've used the paper towel Bearing removal a lot, 3 or 4 times I think. Not much mess that can't be easily wiped off, just takes a while to get enough in there.


For the rope. I rather put it in gear and have someone hold the brakes hard.
 

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For the rope. I rather put it in gear and have someone hold the brakes hard.
oh for sure, thats always the best method, but sometimes you have to remove a crank pulley on an engine thats out of the car. Or the clutch just won't hold. Or its an autotragic.
 

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just added a pic of my pilot bearing removal tool to my big post above there, and cleaned up the post a little.

This is a really good thread that Will started, we should get this thing going again.
 

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The paper towel option works on the pilot bearing!! Just completed the task last night in about 25 minutes!! However make sure you use a bolt that does not need to be re-used as the threads will become mushroomed from hitting the inside of the old bearing!

Scotty G
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Edited post 1. bread works better and faster than the wet paper towels. also added some stuff to post 8. How to replace the starter in 10-15min, and how to keep bolts/nuts from being lost out of your socket when dealing with difficult bolt/nut locations.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Easiest way is to take the upper timing cover off and turn the crank until both cam timing marks line up with the rear cover.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
CRANK TIMING GEAR PULLER


1. Go to a hardware store and buy a 1.5in diameter steel pipe male to male coupler and 1.5in steel pipe female to female coupler.

2. Thread them together.

3. Thread the male end into the gear on the crank.

4. Hook the arms of a 3 jaw puller onto the lip for the female coupler and pull the gear off without damaging it.

IMAG0113~2 by williamb82, on Flickr
 
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For context, from left to right, 5m, 6m, 7m...


For 6ms and 7ms, just use a steering wheel puller. And never use a jaw puller on the outside flange, they come off :(
Good tip Will!
 
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