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I have no problem selling my car to an oil sheikh on whatever site if my car fetches more than $20k.
 

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I know it's crazy. But it has to be good for the mkii market.
I would kind of disagree unless maybe you just want to just sell and get out. One of the things I've always liked in these cars was that they are relatively affordable and you can do what you want with it. Now are we going to be like the Corvette, Ferrari, and Porsche guys and not drive them for fear of devaluing it?
 

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Now are we going to be like the Corvette, Ferrari, and Porsche guys and not drive them for fear of devaluing it?
I'm kind of in that trap, but not fear of devaluing so much as losing it altogether. My 69 Corvette, fine. I can file insurance claim, pull up an online catalog, order absolutely any part I need, it'll be shipped overnight or worst case, I can buy another because they made like 30,000 to 50,000 a year for fourteen years, about a quarter of them were treated as merely weekend toys from new so a lot of them survived and a lot of them have already been restored. Not so with a mk2 Supra. Examples like the one on BAT show up for sale maybe one every two years? Replacement parts are practically non-existent. Don't know how many mk2s were made, but they sold fewer in the U.S over just four and a half years. Nobody ever thought a Japanese car would ever be collectable and obviously some people still have a hard time believing it. Almost none were treated as weekend toys from new, most being driven in the snow, left parked outside while the wife's newer Camry stayed in the garage, meaning a much smaller percentage survived and an even smaller fraction of a fraction of a percent survived in mint condition.

But I think one of the reasons that many of us have a hard time accepting the high prices paid for some classic cars is also behind why we don't fully enjoy our cars once we do get them. Its the way we make our money. To me, there's always an equation in the back of my mind {(p)urchase price + (r)estoration cost = ( y ) ears working at a job that I only begrudgingly do to pay the bills and support my hobby}. (If I had a job doing what I really loved, then I couldn't afford to buy and restore cars.) Now if I were a salesman, a stock trader, a business owner or even a Saudi sheik, then I'd have more of an easy-come, easy-go attitude and the equation would be {(p)urchase price + (r)estoration cost = the next (p)rofitable trade or a resurgence of oil (p)rices}. I just have to remind myself that there are a lot of people in this world with a LOT more money than me, with a lot higher risk tolerance than me, people who could wipe their asses with dollar bills. It doesn't mean they're stupid or insane, just their brains are wired differently. And sadly, yes, if we working stiffs want to own a mint mk2 Supra in the future, then we have to be prepared to bid against them for those few remaining examples. As to whether we drive the heck out of them, well I guess it depends on the value of ( y ). ;)
 
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It's just wild to see one go for that. I like driving mine too much to sell, and it has sentimental value to me. I know I don't plan on doing anything that can't be reverted back to stock. Hold on to those clean ones, just in case you have a run in with an oil tycoon lol.
 

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Impressive indeed. My car is identical except I have over 4x that mileage. Maybe those fine 80s Japanese cars are finally getting some respect.

That won't make me sell mine though ;)
 

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I have spent maybe 7 K in my '84 L and it will NEVER be for sale....only If I total it ..or DIE.
It's my daily and don't have room for another car on my property.3,so far. No garage. No Haggerty insurance.
Hey, Geico rebated me $55 'cause of this world wide mess. If I did have a garage,it would be full of crap,anyway.
35K for a MK II? Insane. That buyer must wipe his butt with twenties.😆
 

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I've told more than one friend over the years, "these are the 57 Chevys of JDM" . I still believe it.
Wish I had heald on to a couple ive given away in the past. The days we could find a decent looking, running one for 2500 are gone.
14630
 
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Always love it when I see this beautiful example pop up here and there over the years. Not sure I could have let it go at any of the price points along the years. To each their own.
 

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I like mine very much - the MK2 was the first car i bought completely on my own, and they will always be special to me,
That's interesting. You made me think any my '84 was also the first I purchased all my own. Though the vehicle i've driven in the longest was an '82 toyota pickup; for about 11 years, ever since I was 16. Because it was so dependable and ran and ran and ran, I became a huge toyota fan.
Once I discovered these little sports cars from the same era, drove one, and saw that they too have many miles on them and are still kicking, I became quite hooked and I don't think I can justify getting rid of mine. I hold a lot of sentiment in these cars as they have served me well and I feel I owe it to them to restore em and keep driving them.
Also I can't tell you how many times I've heard my dad and many many old timers I grew up with that told me about the cars they had and no longer. I vowed that wouldn't be me.
 

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Also I can't tell you how many times I've heard my dad and many many old timers I grew up with that told me about the cars they had and no longer. I vowed that wouldn't be me.
I remember being a poor student, pulling all-nighters, not to study, but to fix my Mercury Capri RS so I could drive to school the next day (it wasn't a very old car then but it was out of warranty and not very reliable). I vowed that wouldn't be me after college. But like most people, I remained relatively poor for a few years after college and just simply didn't have the space to keep both my new pickup truck and my beloved old car. I tried. I really tried, paying an additional $25 a month over a couple of years for an extra covered parking space at my apartment. But when it needed a transmission overhaul, I couldn't afford to pay a professional to do it (would have cost more than the car was worth anyway) and the apartment wouldn't allow DIY car repairs, so I had to break down and sell it.

There comes a point where every car is just no longer practical for daily transportation. If you really use them, they wear out and the parts just don't grow on trees. If you are lucky, maybe your family has some rural property and they'll let you store it in a barn or such until you reach that age of nostalgia where you want to fix it up and drive it again (barn finds occur when the owner dies early, has health problems or realizes he will never be financially successful enough to restore it). For most people though, its just not practical to keep an old car from their youth, especially if they start a family or if their career has them moving around a lot. Hence, that's why when some people finally can afford a toy that takes up nearly 200 square feet of garage, that they are moved to pay some outrageous prices for one "just like they remember". During the auction, when the little teenager on his left shoulder is whispering in his ear about making up for past regrets, the adult accountant on his right shoulder hasn't got a snowball's chance of being heard.

I sure wish I had my old Mercury Capri today. I've been doing car shows for 32 years now and I have yet to ever see another one (heck, I don't think I've seen more than two or three even on the road since the 80s). But if I'm going to get another, its going to be the ASC McLaren edition that I lusted after back in the 80s. But also on my long wish list are a bunch of cars I couldn't have back then. If anyone knows of a Mitsubishi Starion ESI-R or Conquest TSI for sale in absolutely "mint" condition, unmodified with similar sub<50K miles, let me know where. The little accountant on my right shoulder would be gagged and bound with twine to keep him quiet.
 

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...If anyone knows of a Mitsubishi Starion ESI-R or Conquest TSI for sale in absolutely "mint" condition, unmodified with similar sub<50K miles, let me know where. The little accountant on my right shoulder would be gagged and bound with twine to keep him quiet.
You just missed out last week on BAT

 

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Yes, indeed, I've missed a lot of cars on online auction sites that I might have otherwise liked to buy. There may be people in this world who can afford to bid on cars sight-unseen, but I feel like I've got to go see it and drive it. I wish I was retired but with these online auctions, I'm usually pretty well stuffed. By the time I discover the listing, there's usually no way I can make arrangements around my work schedule to travel before the auction ends. I was actually considerably more gungho about a Starquest before March, but with this COVID thing going around and ticket prices going up, I've got to be pretty damned sure about a trip before I get on a plane. Besides scheduling difficulties, I'd hate to spend $500 to $1,000 traveling to see a car, exposing myself to communal cabin air, and then not win the auction. I'd more likely fly if its a private seller, I can work around my schedule and feel there's a good chance of being able to make a deal. But I also have a lot of other classic cars on my long wish list too, and one or another are likely to turn up close enough to home that I could make a day trip in the pickup truck, rent a U-haul trailer to bring it home if I make a deal. So I'm not going to be too sad if I miss one on the east or west coast on an auction site. Those are probably not in the cards anyway.
 

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I couldn't afford to pay a professional to do it (would have cost more than the car was worth anyway) and the apartment wouldn't allow DIY car repairs, so I had to break down and sell it.

If you are lucky, maybe your family has some rural property and they'll let you store it
No, I understand the practicality of how life does that to you. Still a sad story. Good point, I was privy to some property to store my cars as I went through college so I was lucky there.
 

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Another one on ebay;


At some point you've got to roll the dice. The question is are some of these cars worth the price? IMO no. I have a friend into E30 M3s and I've drove those and I wouldn't consider them a 40k+ plus car even though the majority sell for more than that. There are members here around the country that can do an in person survey to weed out the majority of the BS used car sellers. I've been on both sides of the coin on that multiple times. You can spend $1200 and have a car shipped cross country to your door. Factor that into your price. Probably a little cheaper since you're in the middle of the country.
 
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