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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello to all of you Supra fans out there. I realize I already had a thread kinda going about this, but it wasd started off on the wrong foot, so.... Here goes the real project thread. I would love to hear feed back from anyone who wants to post, just remember, I've already made up my mind on this swap so please don't ask me why I chose to do this or that, when all you really are asking is "why don't you do it my way". Thank you all for your support!

I will be swapping the running gear parts from this:




And installing them into this:




It all started about two years ago…… I began thinking about which way I wanted to go with my TE72 project. I kept thinking I was going to do a 4A-GE swap (just like everyone else). Suddenly, like lighting striking my brain, it came to me! I’ll swap in a 5M-GE from an early 80’s Supra. I started doing some research to make sure it was possible to stick the inline 6 under the hood. I managed to find two blurry photos of 7M-GTE’s in TE72’s. That was more than enough proof for me.

First I needed to find a running supra to swap the parts from. I searched and searched, but was always disappointed, because each car would be missing a critical element to my swap. Once, I even got a flat bed trailer and drove 45 miles away to pick up a supra. Only to find out that it was an automatic. Thumbs down! But finally, after months of searching, a customer at my store offered to sell me his old wrecked supra. He had a 1985 P type, powered by a 5M-GE and delivered through a 5speed gear box. The next day, I drove out to inspect the car. He had told me that everything had just been replaced, fresh low miles motor from Japan, four brand new tires, and all new fluids and services. But only one week after everything was finished, it got T-boned by some blonde on the phone. He said it was totaled and could not be driven. I braced myself for the worst….

When I saw the car for the first time, I said to myself; the damage must be on the other side of the car, because this side looks great. But then after seeing the other side I said; maybe the damage was on the first side. The car looked way better than he described! I knew right then that this was the perfect car for my project.

I’m going to take my time on this swap. There are lots of details to cover, and many steps that need to be remembered. I want this log to be a useful step by step tool for anyone else who is thinking about a swap similar to this. Please be patient with this work log, I have I feeling it will take me along time to finish this project.

This has to go!



Let's begin:



















That's better!
Now, let's get the rest of that trash outta there!





























Now we cookin with fire!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
It's time to pull the stuff from Capt. Supra!

Let's begin:





















It's out!!!!

Supra Wiring harness:lame:




Yeah baby!



New header!



This battery tray has seen better days, time to go!











After:



Old:

















Much Better!!!

New crossmember in, from a AE71. Ready to go with a manual rack and pinion steering setup.



Gotta cut the old motor mount brackets off the crossmember.



Then hang the engine where it's going to sit and design a new engine mount bracket.








And build it:










And Weld it to the crossmember.








Then paint, reassemble, and install.





 

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Very nice, I wish I had the garage space and some "extra" tools that you have when I did the first swap in the Celipra.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've been trying to figure out the fuse panel under the hood, testing differant things and seeing what works. So far, I really haven't found any great way to mount everything on the driver's side. I might have to mount the MSD on the passenger side. But I really don't want to. It will be too hot on that side because of the exhaust, and you really sould put the MSD box as close as possible to the coil.



I made cutouts of the MSD box, fuse box, and the coil/igniter; so I could eaily tell where everything would sit.




I improved my design a little, so it would take up less space in the engine bay. I also feel it suits the car better. I cut the metal to the shape I wanted it, then added the proper bends and drilled the holes for mounting the equipment and the panel itself. Then I cut the lower portion and tack welded it to the upper piece.



Then I went back and welded the two pieces solidly together, then ground the joint smooth.



Next I welded on the tabs that will be bolted the car, and I also welded nuts on the backside so the MSD only has to be screwed on. And ended up with this.....





Then Test fitted the panel into the car.





Perfect fit!


Then I primed and painted it.





Then I fitted it back into the car, but now with fresh paint!




And then added some of the equipment.






I also completed the removal of the EGR system. I started by removing the three vacuum 90 deg hard lines that come out of the throttle body housing. And using my new bandsaw, was able to trim them down to around a 1/4 of an inch long. Then I filled them with solder and tapped them back into place.





Then I removed the banjo fitting that supplies vacuum to brake booster and the charcoal can. I then purchased a bolt that has the same thread pitch and Diameter, which is: 12mm x 1.25 Next, I cut the bolt in half and cut a channel into the remaining stud. This way I could tighten it or loosen it with any straight slot screwdriver. Then, I coated the threads with UltraGrey RTV and screwed it into the intake manifold.







 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I really needed a metal brake, but brakes usually start at $800.00 and go up from there. I really did not want to put that much money into a very simple machine. So I tried to build my own.........then I bought a brake. I realized I had no business trying to engineer that ish, when I could get a crappy, brand new one from Harbor Freight for less than $300.00, so that's what I did. :roll:




And then made this in ten minutes:



But let's talk about some other stuff; I finished the mount for the AFM and Air filter. First, I chose a spot that would give me the best airflow while still getting as far from the header as possible.



Then, I located all of the existing threaded holes in that area. Next, using some cardboard I came up with an idea of how to build it and where to attach it to the car. I decided to use band iron as feet bolted to the car and to the AFM, then connect the feet to each other with steel rods. This would give me the flexibility I needed for the complex angles of the fender and also keep the weight down. I started by cutting three small pieces of band iron and drilling a single hole through each one. These will be the feet for the AFM. Then I cut another piece of band iron and drilled a hole through it, this will be a foot for the AFM frame, and will bolt to the threaded hole under the washer bottle on the passenger side fender. Then I cut and welded rods to join the three AFM feet together, this will be the frame for the AFM to sit on.



Then, I welded that AFM mounting frame to the foot with steel rod.





Next, I cut a piece of band iron about two and a half inches long and drilled two holes through it. This will attach to the threaded holes where the 3T-C Coil once sat. Then I bolted the completed AFM frame and foot onto the fender, I also bolted the two holed foot into its spot on the fender, then I tack welded steel rods onto these pieces to connect them together. Next, removed the entire frame, and then finished welding it out side the car.



Last I bolted it into the car and set the AFM on it. I think it looks awesome; I may not even paint it.










Then I decided I really should to get the inside of the car completed so I can focus on the underside and mainly, the rear end and exhaust.
This means the carpet and the dash need to be finished. Also the seats need to be re-installed. First things first; I was really dissatisfied with the carpet that I cut and shaped myself. It never fit the floor quite right, and really didn't work well at all. So I found a two door sedan at the junk yard with blue carpet, and I bought it right away. Nothing fits as well as OEM. I yoinked the homemade carpet out and installed the junk yard carpet in it's place. The fit was way better, and the install only took about a minute. Nice and clean.












Next:

I needed to mount the 5M-GE ECU in a space that would not interfere with the glove box opening or closing. It also needed to be out of the way of the heating equipment, cables, and ducting. I found a good spot just above the main heater duct. There are already two threaded studs protruding from the intake duct that would be perfect for mounting my ECU.






These threaded studs would be used to mount the air conditioning condenser in a car fitted with AC, my TE72 never had it, so this works out great. I cut out a piece of metal and bent it to the desired shape to fit the ECU. Then I drilled holes into this plate for the threaded studs to fit through. I also drilled six small holes where the ECU's mounting screws will fit. Then I attached the ECU to the plate using said screws through said holes. Confused yet? ha ha ha!!!



Next I slid the entire jobby onto the threaded studs and bolted it down tight.






Then I plugged the Engine and Chassis harness's into the ECU.



I then zip tied any hanging wires up and out of the way.




Next, I installed the Heater Blower motor and main duct. The heater blower motor and box attach with three bolts, easy work with a 10mm socket and a 6 inch extension on a ratchet.



I then re-installed the glove box.






Now, all that's missing on the passenger side is a Seat! I'm getting closer!

More updates soon

- Jimmy
 

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It's coming along nicely! The number of photos and the explanation is great... Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you so much, guys. You all are a huge inspiration for me!

I guess I should post an update, since I'm here and I got some new pictures. This week, my car did something it hasn't done in two years.....sat on its own front tires! I was so happy to finally get to this step; you should've seen my face when I took the jack stands out and lowered it to the ground. I freakin love this car!

Anyways.... On with the post:

So, I wanted to use the front suspension from an AE86 for this car, It's the best way to get stronger parts plus better brakes, all in one clean sweep. I had a pair of AE86 strut castings all ready to go, but with no hubs attached. So I thought, maybe the hubs from an '83 SR-5 (AE71 coupe) are the same as an AE86? So I disassembled the hubs from the "duct tape mobile" (my AE71 SR-5 parts car) and compared them with the hubs on my AE86. They are totally different and will not work with AE86 calipers or rotors. So I ditched that idea. So I searched the local junkyards and could not find any AE86s at all. So, after calling some friends, to see if anyone had some hubs for sale, and getting turned down by everyone; my buddy Stewart found a pair and picked them up for me. I guess that's what friends are for! So.....I bought all of the bearings and seals for the front hubs. Then, got to work.

If you've never changed the front wheel bearings in a RWD corolla then please enjoy the write up and pictures, I hope one day it'll come in handy for you.

I will not cover the removal process, because I didn't have any pictures of those steps, my hubs were already off the car and had already been emptied and cleaned. First, place the hub in a vice or take a wheel with the correct lug spacing and set the hub into it face down, so the lug studs are held by the lug holes in the wheel.



place the new brake rotor onto the hub and thread each bolt by hand. Then torque each bolt down using a crisscross pattern.











Then apply some grease liberally to the inside of the hub. Next, take the inside bearing and pack it full of grease, making sure to get grease inside of every little crack and around all sides of everything.





Then place the bearing, small side down, into the hub and make sure it's seated flat. Next, wipe the inside lip of the hub, and press on the new seal. I use a block of wood and a hammer to install the seal. Then check that the seal is flush with the back of the hub.



Then, place the hub/rotor assembly onto the spindle of the strut casting.







Next, apply more grease to the inside of the hub, and pack the new outer bearing really well with grease (grease is your friend) and place it, small end first, over the spindle and push it into the hub until it seats.





Next, add the bearing keeper (the big washer with the small tab in the center) onto the spindle, making sure the tab matches the groove cut in the spindle.



Then, thread the hub retainer nut onto the spindle and turn it by hand until it stops. This nut should be torqued down to Toyotas specs which will "set" the seal. Then, loosen the nut and finger tighten it, until it adds just the slightest bit of drag when turning the rotor.



Then slide the nut keeper down over the nut.



Then a new cotter pin can be sent through the hole in the spindle, then use a pair of pliers to separate and extend the ends of the cotter pin.





Last, Add a fair amount of grease to the cap and tap it into place with a hammer.






Now I can install the entire strut/ hub/ rotor assembly into the car. I lined up the strut tower bolt holes with the studs of the TEIN camber plates and sent the studs through. Then, while holding the assembly in one hand, I threaded the three nuts onto the camber plate studs.



Next, I pressed down on the lower control arm and set the bottom of the strut casting on the steering knuckle, and bolted it into place. Then I tightened the three strut tower nuts.

I am such a slacker!




Then I put the rear of the car on jack stands and swapped the wheels from back to front.



Then I set the front down on the ground, first time since Feburary of 2007!!!!




Now here's the before and after, as of this week!





More updates soon!
 

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Nice job -- lot of hours put in that project.... Cant wait to see you building the mk2 That will be an exellent way to show how to build a outstanding Mk2 Celica Supra....
 

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Wowww man
Awesomee jobb
im loving the pictures and descriptions

Makes the whole thread

Great job keep up the good work
What are yah gunna do for an intake pipe?
 

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Very nice. I don't know anything about corollas but is the stock engine a 22RE? I've always wondered what it'd be like to swap a M series engine in place of a 22RE (because of the Celica having a 22RE and the Celica Supra having the 5MGE). The 5MGE to 7MGTE swap on the MKII is very straight forward and honestly the hardest part for me was doing custom intercooler pipes! That would be a 2 second job for you! Every bracket in your corolla is custom! I wish I had that kind of "know-how". I think (in our garage) we have all the means neccessary for me to build my own engine mounts (custom mounts, brackets, etc) except the tool for cutting thick metal (though we have a chop-saw), but wow!

Very nice job!

Tony
 

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I've always wondered what it'd be like to swap a M series engine in place of a 22RE (because of the Celica having a 22RE and the Celica Supra having the 5MGE).
You should really pay attention to who are members sometime...hint, look at my sig.





Still love the progress you are making. You have done a ton more fab that I would have thought/wanted to do, but it looks like you said it has taken 2 years so far? It is going to be well worth it and you are going to love how the car handles now. And I love the using a rim trick for swapping rotors, I never though of that one before.
 

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I don't know about your first thread or why anyone would give you problems about this swap, but so far, you are kicking arse!!!! Great pics, great fab work, great inginuity!!!! I have subscribed and look forward to updates.
 

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Nice work - great pics and write-up. Can't wait to see the finished product.
 

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Subscribed! Excellent work, can't wait to see it finished!
 
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