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Ok, getting into the harder stuff now. Finished this section off last week.

I actually have donor metal for this car that I got off a super low miles rust free car from a wrecker, a total anomaly up here, so I took every usable part off the car (link), but the car was hit in the DS rear quater so I had to fabricate the replacement panels.








As you can see the flare still fits nice, its quite tricky making everything line up when you have to replace 3 separate pieces from scratch at once. Its very handy to have an intact car around to look at and measure when doing this. Obviously its not going to look phenominal till the bodywork stage is done, and any area that will be covered by flare doesn't need to be asthetically perfect.

The other side poses its own challanges, stay tuned.
 

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Alright, long overdue for an update here. Just finishing off the passenger side rear quater and the gas tank area. This is probably the trickiest section to fix on these cars due to how the panels are formed and how the gas tank passes through.

Here's the exposed damage...


But the gas cap area on the inside has absolutly no undercoating...


To start, we cut out the perforated section, this requires peeling back the lower rear valance panel...




Next, there were signs that the rust on the back of the inner gas cap lid chamber had spread through to the other side. That complicates things as the only way to fix it is to remove the inner chamber panel, which can only be done if the outer chamber panel is removed first....




With the panels out I was able to sandblast them and clean them up nicely off the car and treat the rust on car that was previously unaccessable...



Now luckily I had donor metal for this area. I've figured out how I would do this without it, but it is certainly a little simpler with...



But wait, nothing is ever that simple. This sheet metal is off a car with only 88,000kms on it, that obviously was garage kept and appeared to be 100 percent rust free. But unfortunatly, any Celica Supra that has lived in even a moderatly wet climate and hasn't had a rigourous undercoating job is not truely rust free. Toyota really didn't put enough effort into sealing up these cars. You can see that the drain hole rusted around the rubber plug, but more alarming you can just barely see that rust has already started on the inner sections of this panel that we can't access. There's only one way to fix this...


Once the thing is seperated, the rust can be fixed and the panel reassembled (the rusted area for the plug was replaced too, the plug isn't necesary, theres another little one on the bottom that doesn't rust out)





Once its back together, you can use seam sealer to fill ALL of the panel seams so it won't rust out again.

Now with the donor metal all fitted and prepped, its time to weld it all in.



On the inside I had to remove and recreate the mounting tab for the wheel liner...


Then on the areas that were highly suseptible to the rust returning I POR15ed them...



Last reattach the outter gas cap chamber, a bit of self etching primer, some sealer and that about takes care of this corner (except a little bodywork later on of course)...








Thats the last of the rust behind the shock towers, next up is any rear tower and floor pan damage.
 

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I love these type of threads. Great work so far! Can't wait to see your final work.
 

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Unfortuantly it may be awhile before we can post pretty pictures of the car all painted and fully reassembled as Dean hasn't determined yet when he's going to have the paint portion of the restoration done. My end of things will wrap up in the next month or so and the bodywork will be all done, the repaired areas primered and ready for paint and some basic reassembly, but the car will be going into storage for at least a year before the paint work. I may be doing that as well, depends on availablity and all when Dean is ready.

Thanks for the compliments though, and there will be many more updates soon!
 

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Time for another update.

Check my last post, I just added 4 new pics to the end of it. Sometimes I add pics of the repair with the final primer work and sealant applied later on as I like to give the primer a day to dry before I apply the sealant as it tends to disolve the primer if it hasn't cured abit. I also will not apply paint or primer overtop of the sealant untill its cured overnight as it shrinks a little when it fully dries.

Alright, next up rear seatbelt buckle mount area...



Doesn't look too bad right? This is the underside and the cause of the problem...


At first glance it looks like a single plate spot welded to the floorpan but infact its 2 plates, and the middle one is spot welded to the frame rails. And of course theres no sealant from the factory around any of the seams, so it creates a nice rust sandwhich as dirt and water can get in between the plates and rot out the spot welds. Lets see what it looks like inside...

hmmm, going to have to go deeper...






So as usual, what you see on the outside is rarely the worst of it. The actual exposed damage was very minimal, but infact most Supras look like this or worse once you open them up. Note how little the exposed damage was on the DS, yet on the inside it was almost as bad as the other side.

So the middle panel on the PS was rotted straight through in a couple spots so I replaced it with new metal completely, and then sand blasted and primered the other panels...

Note in this pic the gas tank mounting hardware in the top right, which I've removed (luckily they bolt off) and also sandblasted, soon to be POR15ed.

Next up the rust on the car was ground off or the metal removed if the rust was too deep...



Its pretty simple after that, weld it all back together with generous portions of weld thru primer (I use this awesome silver high build stuff that is very durable) and then seal it up with seam sealer...



And thats about it, it will never rust again here. If only Toyota had taken a couple minutes to seal these panels up properly at the factory. Once all the metal work is done the bottom of the car will get scrubbed spotless and get a full proper undercoating, and it will all look very factory and brand new.

Things are going quick now, look for another update soon!
 

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http://www.proformproducts.com/en/products/detail/?id=81

Good stuff. The black sealer I was using before was a different brand (Domestic Sure Seal, great products normally from these guys) and I didn't like how hard it was drying to, this stuff stays about as flexable as the stock sealer. Its a little runnier going on which can be handy but does make it messier, however its pretty easy to work with and is the most similar to the stock stuff I've tried yet.

Alright, another little update.

Here's a super common rust spot, still in very early stages on this car...


This is the top of the rear wheel well. So why does it rust? Because of this little reinforcment panel they weld on underneath in the wheel well...


You can see the ends are not sealed in so it allows dirt and water to get at the spot welds underneath and rust out the well. I don't think I've ever owned a mk2 that didn't have this spot. Luckily, the DS was actually completly sealed up by the factory undercoating...

So nothing to do there, the rust always comes from underneath. Alright, lets get into it...


With the reinforcement panel removed we can see what we're working with.



I had to remove a bit of both well panels. Almost got away with just grinding off the rust on the outer one but the metal got too thin in one spot once I ground it all off.

So unfortunatly this spot is one of only a few on the car that is boxed in. What I mean is there are braces under the window that seal in the cavity that I've opened up. Here's a shot of the brace from inside the panel...


There is no good access to the back of the sheet metal I've cut out. This is a problem as welding burns up the paint on the other side of the sheet metal and you need to recoat it when your done if you want to avoid rust in the future. This is why so many DIYer or average bodyshop rust repairs end up rusting out again. You really need to think of how your going to repair a spot so that you'll have access to both sides of the metal before its done so you can seal it up properly. This is why I welded on the new bottom plate first...


I was able to get a little paint in there through the upper hole, but it wasn't enough. Your options at this point are try and spray the back side with some of that wax inner panel protectant stuff (which I really dislike) through a wd40 style straw, or add some access panels...


Since this patch bridges that brace I had to add two (ignore the little hole in the center). Hole saws are great. You can see the burnt sections inside that were previously unaccessable. It was tight working through those little holes, but it was doable...


I managed to paint and seam seal the entire patch seam and then some through the new access holes. Obviously these holes will be covered up by the interior and they are too small to weaken the structure of the car.

And heres a few shots of the rest of the sealer work, the way it should have been from the factory...

And the top too for insurance...


The next update is gonna be scary, for everyone. The area I'm attacking next is probably the area that rusts the most undetected, and is rusty on just about every mk2. Its also one of the areas that can kill one of these cars for good if the rust goes unchecked for too long. Stay tuned.
 

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Ok, its time for a serious one. This is the symptom...


Thats the inside of the rear wheel well, Driver Side. Of more concern to most, is what the PS shows (which we'll focus on first)...


Thats it, almost nothing. Obviously this rust is coming through the other side, which looks like this...


Here's the flaw. Theres 3 layers of metal spot welded together, and no seam sealer. The undercoating usually covers the top and side edges of the outermost sheet, but the bottom is always left open. Sometimes on a really heavy aftermarket undercoating job the seam gets filled, but pretty rarely as the gaps are really large. You can see the bottom seam better in this next one, where I've wire wheeled off the undercoating...


You can see there was rust on the right side hiding under the undercoating.

Another problem is there's only paint in the upper spring seat area so the spot welds tend to rust...


Alright, that outer panel has to come off. The trick is figuring out where the rust ends so you don't take more off then necesary (its alot of work drilling out these spot welds, that outer panel is some of the thickest sheet metal on entire body).



And the real damage is exposed. That inner panel had to have a chunk replaced.


And then weld the outer panel back on after sandblasting, treating the rust with metal prep and zinc primering it...


Last seam seal any and all seams that could allow moisture at the welds...



Now back to the DS, which is a good example of how rust in this area can become a serious problem if it goes unchecked for too long. A little chiping at the undercoat revealed the damage on the outside.


Its got to come apart...


Thats not even all of it as the middle layer is hiding more, so its got to go too...


You can see that the spring mount piece is really heavily corroded, perforated a little even, I had to take chunk out of it too...


One little rust area can be alot of work, it takes 3 pieces to put this all back together properly...


The outer piece is very thick so again I was able to sandblast it and treat it and then reuse it, which helps alot.

The spring seat gets its patch in first...


Then the middle layer...


And last the original outer layer...


And finally the primer and sealer and its good untill the undercoating stage (which I'll do all at once after all the metal work is done)...




So in conclusion, its vitally important that the seam at the bottom of these 3 panels gets sealed up on cars that havn't rusted yet, the trick is telling if its started inside or not. This is one of Toyota's biggest oversites on these cars if you ask me, the gaps are huge and its in a very sensitive place. Many a mk2 has been sent to the scrapper due to severe rust from this oversight.

Its getting close, its pretty much just the front outer sections of the rear wheel wells now. Thanks for reading.
 

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The attention to detail continues to impress... I wonder how many bodies have been 'restored' with out all this stuff overlooked.
 

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Sadly, probably 90+ percent. This isn't the kind of work bodyshops do, you have to take your car to a classic car restoration shop for this kind of work or do it yourself. And most of those stick to "body on frame" cars, unibody restoration techniques aren't widely taught or practised. It doesn't help that most restorers don't regard japanese cars terriably highly and finding bodyshops that are even willing to do rust repair is getting harder and harder.
 

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Wouldnt it have been cheaper and less time consuming to come to Socal and find a nice clean rust free mkii?


great write up....
 

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Actually I've owned several "former CA" mk2s, and they all had significant rust as they'd been up here for awhile already. Starting with what appears to be a rust free car is always a good idea as it does reduce how much work you have to do. However your guy's cars aren't anymore rust proof then ours and everything needs to be sealed up like I've done right away once they get here and any hidden rust removed, which involves drilling and welding to open up panels in several places as I've shown. I bet you there aren't many CA cars that I couldn't find some rust hiding on. Its the low frequency of rain that keeps your cars from rotting like ours do, but it still rains sometimes and you still have to wash your car. Yes there are places that let water into the inner panels just from washing, wait for the next update for that.

Besides its pretty hard to get a nice CA car with a mint interior and good trim. Steel bodies can be fixed, but most of our trim and interior parts can't be replaced new. Washington and Oregon are actually much better places to find mk2s with both fairly rust free bodies and decent interiors. Again though there's lots of moisture down there too, I'm sure the vast majority of their supposed rust free mk2s have rust starting inside the panels in most of the places I've covered here. The way this car has been restored, it should be able to remain rust free forever being regularly driven in our climate, not just for the next 5-10 years like a SoCal import that gets regular use up here does.

Also with this particular car, there were lots of features, upgrades and other reasons to go with it. You've seen this one before Zank, its the one I took to TORCFest that one year.

I'm almost done with this car, next up will be an LType with a similar amount of rust, and then a "rust free socal" car thats been up here for around 5 years and seen lots of regular use. We'll see how well its survived soon enough ;)
 

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Great Thread Guys! this has got to be the most detailed & comprehensive one regarding the rust issue with our bodys..

this was the kind of restore i was looking for when i had a mk2 tackling the windsheild area, & other spots, but Not one single bodyshop was willing to do it, and i looked everywhere... infact one place was giving me a go away price, by quoting me $10thousand dollars for thw indshield...
Excellent work!! Seamus!!!
 

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Alright, time for the most common rust spot on these cars (or any toyota of this vintage). This update will cover 2 spots in one actually as they're so close to each other it made sense to fix them at the same time.

The ol Toyota rear rocker rot...


And this peculiar spot in the wheel well...


Peculiar because usually only the passenger side gets it, at least not unless the car is really, really rusty. There's also a weird imprint in the steel, visible just under the rust spot, that isn't on the other side. I looked at a few different Supras and Celicas on the property and they all have the rust spot and mark on the PS only. The rot here appears to start from a gap in the panel that isn't sealed on the top left edge (the section in shade in the photo), and from an absence of sealer on the side facing the control arm hinge.

The rocker on the other hand rots from a combination of unsealed seams and a constant stream of water passing through the inside of the panel. In later years the butyl tape sealer on the quarter glass starts to degrade and then leak. This leak often goes unnoticed till you get the old "wet seatbelt" symptom. However, long before the window starts to leak, our wonderful door jam vents let water stream right into the inner panel. And when I say long before, I mean I can't see how these damn things ever kept the water out from day one. First off there's supposed to be a bead of tape around the inner edge, but if the vent has ever been removed that tape isn't doing anything and will let water by. But worse, I've sat in my car with the rear interior panel off while someone sprayed the roof of the car with a hose and watched water pool in the bottom of that vent and then drip right into the inner panel. The little rubber breathers on the inside of the vent don't stop water worth a damn. I think these things leak in every Toyota they used them in too, I know for a fact they do the same thing in AE86s. Anyways, I will go into this issue and the possible fixes for it later and in more detail in another thread. Onto the rust repair...

Lets have a look at what we're dealing with...

With the outer rotted section removed we can see what’s left and we've opened up the boxed in rail that runs inside the rockers. This is another one of those places where we're not going to have access to the other side of the panel after we repair it to paint the areas burned up from welding.

Looking at the rocker from the outside it appears the rot is only above the black section as we've caught it early on this car. However, that is never the case with this spot, take a peek inside the panel...


We can just barely see that there’s some rust on the entire length of this panel.

Its going to have to come off...


That doesn't look so bad, but check out the inside of the piece we just removed...


And I'm sad to say, but this is normal for these cars. For sure a car that has no signs on the outside will not be this bad on the inside, but I bet you the majority of you with supposed rust free cars have a little bit of surface rot like this going on in your rockers. At least with our cars its just this back corner that goes, this panel is separate from the rest of the rocker. Many old Toys and other Japanese classics have serious rocker issues, ours are easy to fix in comparison.

Lets see how. So first things first, the remaining rust has to be cleaned up on the car...


You can see I had to remove a piece of the channel that runs along the edge of the wheel well, it had perforated through in several spots.

That means I'm going to have to manufacture 3 new pieces to fix this corner...


Luckily since the lower section of the quarter hadn't rotted through, the rust on the inside wasn't very deep and I was able to sand blast the piece and treat it, and then reuse it.

Here I've welded in the new channel and coated everything in weld through primer...


Next the patch for the inside of the wheel well goes on...


Now I have to deal with sealing up the backside of this piece I've just put in before we close up the rocker for good. The problem is the inside of the rocker is boxed in like I mentioned, so that means we need an access hole...


Hole-saw to the rescue! You can see inside the burnt sections that would have remained bare. As for the hole cut, besides the fact that no one will ever see it, it does no harm strength wise as its fairly small and in fact there’s another one just like it from the factory about 6 inchs back.

Its tight but I was able to get in there with my stainless steel brush, clean it up, paint it and seam sealer it...


The rest of the backside of that big patch panel was fairly easy to get at and deal with at this stage.

Now for some tricky fabrication...


This is the new\old outer panel. The bottom is obviously the original section, but the top is all new metal. It took a couple other little bits to fill in all the gaps as this is a complex shape to replicate as its got several bends and contours on the original stamped piece. Since the long cut is going to have to be butt-welded back together, I also added a thin backing to bridge the two pieces and make welding it back together easy (butt welding sheet metal sucks ass, always avoid it). Here's the back of this panel all sealed up and ready to install...


And on she goes...


I was very careful with my cuts so that upper section would be fully covered by the flare so I wouldn't have much bodywork to do. Anything that’s under the flare doesn't need to be made to look like factory. I can make it that way, but it takes a lot more time (and we all know what time is). Here's a shot with the flare on...


And finally all primered up...



Now all of the insides need to be sealed in so the patch panel gaps aren't exposed...




Getting the sealer onto that butt edge section was tricky, its pretty tight in there.


Here I've sealed the bottom edge of the seam completely except where the factory drains are. Having some drains is good but from the factory this seam was way too exposed and allowed too much dirt and water to get sucked into the quaters.


Here I've ground off a touch of surface rust that started around most flare bolt holes as the spot welds on the outer quater skin around the wheel well are very susuptible to rust as the gap between the outer quater and wheel well panels is never fully sealed and the gaps quite large. I'm sure if I had completely detached the quater skin I would have found a bit of minor rust starting around the spot welds but this seam is actually fairly well sealed on the inside by the foam tape they use inbetween these panels. So with a bit of POR15 and a good bead of seam sealer on the outside, those spot welds should be air tight and safe from further corroision now.


All of the outer metal work I've done will get a coat of rockerguard as well once the bodywork is done.

One more down, and one more update to go and the metal work will be done!
 

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I've also updated an old post. Coming up with the idea for the access holes for the boxed in section made me realize I should have done that with the rust spot on the top of the wheel well too, so I took care of that. The post on that spot has been updated with a few new pics and the new process written in. Here's the link to that post...

http://forums.celicasupra.com/showpost.php?p=642213&postcount=29
 

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your 3rd car is identical to mine lol! great choice!
 
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