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Looks like all the studs sheared off. You are definitely going to need a water pump, but I'm concerned that you kept going after the water pump ceased to function. Before you spend money on a water pump and other parts, you need to assess the damage to the cylinder head, pistons and cylinder walls. Check the following in this order: First check to see if the oil looks like a chocolate milkshake. If the oil looks clear, then check to see if there's any oil sludge in the radiator. Next, pull all the spark plugs, remove the distributor cap and turn the engine over by hand with a ratchet, noting if it binds up anywhere and that the distributor rotor turns. If it turns freely without binding and the distributor is rotating, then you may have dodged a bullet and it should be safe to try to start it. Last, put the spark plugs back, charge the battery and go ahead and try to start it. Don't run it for more than a minute without the belts in place, but if it starts and runs with a fresh battery then the engine is still ok and you can spend money on a new water pump and get a used replacement pulley. But if any of the previous tests are not good, then no point buying a water pump for a boat anchor.
 

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Don't MIX the fluid colors because the different chemicals can sometimes react badly to one another. That's why they are different colors. Check to see what color coolant is already in it. I can't tell from your photos. We recommend the Toyota red, but if its got green in it and you are not going to do a flush right now, then just top it off with the same color or look for one that says its safe to mix until you can get around to doing a flush and then replace it all with the correct stuff.
 

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Does it still have an original alternator? I'm looking at those fans and wondering. I think the original was a 60amp and so its been popular to upgrade to 80 or 120amp alternators from newer cars, particularly when running an extra load like a big stereo or those electric fans. But the "ears" on an alternator from another car are often clocked slightly different or the pulley that came with the alternator might be a hair smaller or larger, either of which could necessitate the next size belt. If you've already got that little 10mm nut that Jeremy has shown above cranked as far as it will go and its still not tight enough, you can take the belt back to the store and ask them to look up the belt lengths in the manufacturer's catalog by part number and order you the next shorter belt. I think they come in like 10mm increments.

IIRC, mine is from a 92 Camry and I know the stock belt doesn't fit because it started chirping and I needed to replace it not too long ago. I forgot that little detail from my build 23 years earlier and just ordered the stock belt off Rock Auto or Amazon. Had to stop in the middle of the job and order the next size to fit, but luckily I didn't have to figure it out all over again because after I had the old belt off, it was easy to look up the part number that was printed on the belt itself. I'm guessing that you can't look up the part number on the belt that was previously installed as its gone missing entirely? It's been less than two years since my last replacement and I've already forgotten again whether it was longer or shorter than the original. 😳 That's what happens when you get old.
 
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