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'85 P-type stock
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am getting close to finishing the replacement of all the front seals on my '85 and installing a new timing belt and tensioner. I have been reading that due to stretching, one should use a new crank bolt when reinstalling the harmonic balancer (crank pulley). The reason is that the stretched crank bolt will bottom out in the crankshaft and the crank pulley will be loose causing premature failure. I have looked everywhere and I cannot find a new crank bolt for my '85. The part has been discontinued. Does anybody know where one can find a new crank bolt? As an alternative, could one file down the end of the used bolt so it doesn't bottom out in the crank and allow for the crank pulley to be torqued to 195 ft/lbs? Thanks for sharing your thoughts and knowledge.
 

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test crank bolt.

1. spin it on without pulley until it bottoms. Measure length of free threads

2. measure thickness of pulley + washer

How does #1 compare with #2?
 

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Torque is 159 ft-lb on the 5M. Unless someone over torqued the crap out of it it's unlikely its damaged. In the past it was like a 6 or 7 dollar part from Toyota so changing it was a conservative no big deal thing. These days you don't have that freedom.
 
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'85 P-type stock
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
test crank bolt.

1. spin it on without pulley until it bottoms. Measure length of free threads

2. measure thickness of pulley + washer

How does #1 compare with #2?
Okay. I screwed the crank bolt all the way into the crankshaft until I felt resistance and there was slightly less than 3/16" of gap between the bolt flange and the end of the crankshaft. Then I measured how thick the crank pulley was where it goes on the crankshaft and it measured 1 11/16". From this, I subtracted the distance from the taper in the crankshaft to the end of the crankshaft which measured 1 7/16". This means the crank pulley sticks out from the end of the crankshaft 1/4". If the crank bolt starts to bottom out with 3/16" of a gap, that means I should be ok but it will be close. Unfortunately while screwing the crank bolt in, I noticed it was very sloppy and had way more play than I would like to see. I am really starting to get mad at the people who did the timing belt (the only time the crank bolt would have been removed). The threads don't look great on my crank bolt so I picked up a used one on eBay that look much better (at least in the photo). Still hoping to find a new one somewhere. Hopefully threads of crankshaft aren't toast. So much for a simple repair. Still trying to get the Woodruff keys out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Torque is 159 ft-lb on the 5M. Unless someone over torqued the crap out of it it's unlikely its damaged. In the past it was like a 6 or 7 dollar part from Toyota so changing it was a conservative no big deal thing. These days you don't have that freedom.
Interesting, I was seeing 195 ft/lbs on other threads so I just pulled the Toyota 5M-GE Engine repair manual that I had purchased years ago and it states to torque the pulley center bolt to 98-119 ft/lbs when re-installing the crank pulley.
IMG_3688.jpg
 

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159 here;


Interestingly I have an 85 reprint that is 160 and an older 86 manual that is 159. Sometimes they edit things over time in manual. These days they are electronic so that solve old copies floating around
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Torque is 159 ft-lb on the 5M. Unless someone over torqued the crap out of it it's unlikely its damaged. In the past it was like a 6 or 7 dollar part from Toyota so changing it was a conservative no big deal thing. These days you don't have that freedom.
My Chilton repair manual also states 98-119 ft/lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
159 here;


Interesting like I have an 85 reprint that is 160 and an older 86 manual that is 159. Sometimes they edit things over time in manual. These days they are electronic so that solve old copies floating around
The Toyota manual was published in 1981 and the Chilton manual was published in 1988
 

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May be that is why there is so many crank snout threads and key all chew-up.
The TSRM is still the reference, except for the head bolts.
 
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