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found this amazing article about 4 months ago that they put a bunch of oils through tests to see what had the best "film strength". after reading this it really changed my perspective on oils its pretty crazy! oh and sorry HUGE pdf but amazing article!

http://www.animegame.com/cars/Oil Tests.pdf
 

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Royal Purple 10W-40 is super.
Redline 5W-40 not so great.
Mobil-1 0W-40 is terrible.
Valvoline DuraBlend 10W-40 is best value.
 

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thanks!
 

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Take this with a grain of salt, and by grain of salt i mean the test is almost useless when it comes to engine oil....

google "street commodores oil test" there is some good info on bobistheoilguy.com forums with regards to this test too.
 

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Isn't that the link in the first post?
yes,

here

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=street+commodores+oil+test

link #1 and it's sub-link are of interest.

a couple clicks later you get this:

http://www.streetcommodores.com.au/news/01_oils_aint_oils.php

which is the actual magazine that published it. which says the following:

"If there's one thing we try and do here at Street Commodores, it's give you, our readers un-biased info on which products are good, and which ones suck. There's so much BS marketing guff out there, that it can be tough to nut out which products can walk the walk – so that's where we come in, doing our best to sort the Holdens from the Lada Nivas.

A few months back (issue 108), you might remember we did an oil comparison. At the time, we thought it was a bloody good thing, and we don't mind telling you we were pretty proud to publish an article that basically bagged a heap of big name brands. You see, at Street Commodores, we can't, and won't be bought. We like to play things straight. And in the name of playing things straight, we'd like to tell you what has happened since that story went to print.

Basically, we made a few oil companies very cross, and some others quite happy; but we've also been educated some more on engine oils, and being the type of publication that we are, we wanted to fill you in on it. The information we've learned since then suggests the test we performed may be irrelevant. Some sources have advised us that the test we used would have been better served testing some of our favourite greases rather than the engine oils we commonly use on our street cars. Sure, we did the test with the best intentions, with a level playing field for each oil and no preconceptions as to who would perform better than another, but when, and if, we mess up, we like to think that we're man enough to set the record straight.

So keep an eye out in an upcoming issue real soon for an in-depth look at what makes up the contents of your oil, what to look for when choosing one, why certain ingredients are so important and whether the test we used was irrelevant for testing oils. "
 

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here's a video where AMSOIL explains how the falex test can be done improperly, and manipulated to with great variance in results. extremely similar to the tests performed in the magazine.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5WXbj5jbN8

would you put shampoo in your engine? According to this test, it could be the best oil ever made!

just take things with a grain of salt and realize that there's much more to oil than any one specific test can show. Used oil analysis using various oils is the only way to know....


mobil 1's response to tests of this type:

http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/MotorOil/Car_Care/AskMobil/Oil_Film_Strength.aspx

There are certain oils in the market today that use EP (extreme pressure) additives in their engine oil that are really designed for gear oils and not engine oils. Extreme pressure additives are typically not used in engine oils for a number of reasons but the most important is because they can cause engine corrosion over time. The rigs being used in these demonstrations are primarily designed for industrial applications like gear oils where extreme pressure is an important performance feature you need. These demonstration rigs have very little to do with modern engines and that is the reason that market leading oils in the industry perform poorly in these tests.
 

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I've come to believe that ANY quality, name-brand oil is OK to use these days.

Synthetics give you a bit more protection and longer change intervals, but good quality "Dino" oil is perfectly fine to use, too.

Growing up in 1960's, we were taught that oil had to be changed every 3000 miles or 3 months, and that's what we did.

50 years later, and technology has progressed to where changing oil at that schedule is throwing away perfectly good oil!

I get the oil in my Jeep Grand Cherokee analyzed at every change, and the oil analysis company I send the samples to has me now changing my oil every 8500 miles (I run Mobil1 5W-20), and the results from the testing indicate that I could go 10,000 miles!

Old habits die hard, though, so I'm conservative and change it at 8500 miles even though the test results say the oil has plenty of "life" left in it.

Here's the place I send my oil samples to:

http://www.blackstone-labs.com/

I get nothing for recommending them as an oil test place;Im just a satisfied customer!

Jim
 

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I agree with Jim. Having built hundreds of engines, the biggest technological change by far since "the old days" is in oil quality. Everything else has just been small incremental improvements on what has been known for many decades. Racing oils in the 60's and 70's were terrible. Even the best weren't worth crap. Those 50 and 60 weight racing oils really amounted to nothing more than a wedge of oil being pushed around by the journals it was supposed to keep from contacting those precious bearing surfaces. It's no different than if these journals were plowing oil out of the way like snowplows plow snow off roads, which is essentially how they worked under extreme loads. Even today's cheapest oils work fine and would work and last fine in racing applications.
The benefits of synthetics are actually under rated. They're more than worth their costs because of their low temperature flow characteristics and the extended change intervals they allow. I'm not sure of the actual percentage of engine wear that happens with conventional oils when they're cold but it has to be close to all of it.
People often think that because synthetics show lower oil pressure that that's a bad thing. In reality it's exactly the opposite. Oil pressure is resistance to flow so lower oil pressure indicates better flow characteristics.
Others think that the ancient oil change interval recommendations are and will always be the rule. Following them with current oils amounts to nothing more than throwing good money away.
Maybe those companies defending themselves from the results of irrelevant test procedures are really just trying to politely explain some important scientific truths and nothing more. The only testing anyone should trust is that done by independent agencies associated with a particular industry and knowledgeable of what's important and how to properly test things for what matters. I'm not taking sides here, just trying to relate my experiences.
It's funny, knowing things happens from personal experience. Believing things is not the same at all without that personal experience being required. But even things we know are subject to change. Not everything that seems too good to be true is crap. Sometimes new stuff really is a great improvement.
 

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And synthetics have much higher film strength, so even with "low" oil pressure showing, your bearings are still safe from metal-to-metal contact.

They also take less power to pump through the system, and are more slippery than regular "dino" oil, lessening friction, and freeing up additional power and gas mileage.

And they have excellent detergent properties and high temperature characteristics which keep your engine MUCH cleaner inside. The oil doesn't cook-off and form varnish like older oils did, although I'm sure new "dino" oil is far better at that than the oils I grew up with.

When Mobil-1 first came out, I had a brand-new VW Scirocco. The first 7500 miles I was using regular oil, and getting about 275~280 miles per tank of gas. After 7500 miles, I switched to Mobil-1, and was getting 320~330 miles per tank of gas. I was also one of the few cars in my neighborhood that would turn right over and start at -10*~-20* in the winter time. The engine also revved freer, and when I pulled the head off at 85,000 miles to replace the valve guides (a known problem on those engines), the head had NO traces of varnish anywhere, and there was no real "ridge" at the tops of the cylinders, indicating to me that the cylinder walls had very little wear.

Advances in oil technology have truly been impressive over the years I've been involved with automotive stuff. A lot of it was made possible by the military and space programs, that forced manufacturers to come up with better lubricants for precision equipment operating in *really* extreme environments. Increased computing power and advances in understanding Petroleum Chemistry made it possible to design molecules to do things never thought of, and the basically unlimited military/aerospace budgets of the time made it happen.

We've come a long way since Lt. Col. Al Amatuzio experimented with jet turbine oil in his own car!

As for me, I'm running Castrol "High Mileage" oil in Ms. Swan, which is a synthetic blend. I'm not sure if I believe that stories about pure synthetics causing leaks in older, high mileage engines. IF you go to a lighter weight oil, THEN it might start leaking past parts that have opened up their clearances with age and mileage, but if you stick with the same weight oil, it shouldn't leak if it wasn't leaking. I suppose it's possible that a very dirty engine with lots of crud and varnish in it could develop some leaks from using a pure synthetic, but that's the fault of whoever let it get that dirty, and not the oil!

Oh, well.....just my $.02 on oils.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Here's the place I send my oil samples to:

http://www.blackstone-labs.com/

I get nothing for recommending them as an oil test place;Im just a satisfied customer!

Jim
Yeah I have heard of them too, it is really cool and I heard fairly resonable to do. Always nice to know whats actually going on in your motor and see how fast it is breaking down. Was that just daily driving where you got over 8,500 miles? My roommates car I do all the maintaining on all his cars and in his drift car two events and she is getting pretty gnarly and dark. I should send his off to see what they say. Would be cool for sure!

Ray85p I agree it is pretty crazy how far oil has really come in the years. In my daily I just use napa synthetic and have never had a problem. I also never rev it past 3k haha I baby her because I want it to last.
 

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I'm not sure if I believe that stories about pure synthetics causing leaks in older, high mileage engines
Cause them, no, but a synthetic will sure find them in a hurry. Ideally people should fix the leaks/burning oil issues and run straight synthetic even in older motors. But real world driven everyday cars usually have leaks that are on the list to be fixed but haven't gotten to yet or worn down rings etc. that aren't worth fixing. If you are in this boat you will leak/burn twice as much pure synthetic at twice the cost in half the time, making it an expensive and dangerous (greater risk of running oil too low) proposition for all but well-maintained motors (regardless of age).
 

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Yeah I have heard of them too, it is really cool and I heard fairly resonable to do. Always nice to know whats actually going on in your motor and see how fast it is breaking down. Was that just daily driving where you got over 8,500 miles? My roommates car I do all the maintaining on all his cars and in his drift car two events and she is getting pretty gnarly and dark. I should send his off to see what they say. Would be cool for sure!

Ray85p I agree it is pretty crazy how far oil has really come in the years. In my daily I just use napa synthetic and have never had a problem. I also never rev it past 3k haha I baby her because I want it to last.
Yes, it's from my 2006 Jeep Grand Cherokee with a 5.7 L Hemi, which is my daily driver/tow vehicle. My mix of driving is about 50/50 surface streets and freeways, and I only put about 7k a year on it.

I have the sample results from every oil change it's ever had, and I switched to pure synthetic at 2500 miles, which was the first oil change it had. I don't care how well they claim new engines are built, and how clean the environment is where they build them; I'm a firm believer in getting the "Factory Fill" changed well before the recommended first change.
 

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The only meaningful tests that I can envision is to run the engine on a dynamometer at 5600 rpm and heavy load (say 3/4 max) for a 100 Kmi changing the oil at prescribed intervals with a prescribed air filter (dirt in air ingested by engine is what causes wear) and measure compression before and after test to see wear. OR measure mileage on dyno under CAREFULLY controlled conditions for different oils.
 
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