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I was curious ive seen original trim that clips into the holes and other thinner stuff that's like stick on, is the stick on aftermarket? original trim I always see in bad condition whats the deal with that?
 

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I'm not 100% sure I know what you mean but... If you're talking about the width of something like body side molding meaning "the thinner stuff" then yes that is probably after market that was installed with double sided tape. Most original across brands that I have seen over the years has been attached with clips of some sort or really early cars nuts on studs that go through holes in the panel. My guess is that if rust starts in the panel and spreads to the studs or clips in the trim. Just my guess
 

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"What's With That?" is that these cars are 32 to 37 years old, and most weren't treated very well after they became used cars.

You have to remember that these were $1000 cars at one time, with all that goes along with it. I saw the same thing happen to any number of American Muscle Cars after their prices bottomed out, and before the whole "Collector Car" got really going strong. They got cheap, and were treated as cheap cars with poor or no maintenance, and much abuse.

Japanese "rust proofing" was almost non-existent back then, and one British magazine said these cars would just "dissolve" if allowed to stay wet. I've looked at cars that lived their entire lives at the beach in Southern California, ungaraged, and they all had holes in the body you could stick your fist through. And the cars that lived in desert areas, like mine, have excellent bodies, but the plastic parts used in the interior are just disintegrating in my fingers.

- Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #4
"What's With That?" is that these cars are 32 to 37 years old, and most weren't treated very well after they became used cars.

You have to remember that these were $1000 cars at one time, with all that goes along with it. I saw the same thing happen to any number of American Muscle Cars after their prices bottomed out, and before the whole "Collector Car" got really going strong. They got cheap, and were treated as cheap cars with poor or no maintenance, and much abuse.

Japanese "rust proofing" was almost non-existent back then, and one British magazine said these cars would just "dissolve" if allowed to stay wet. I've looked at cars that lived their entire lives at the beach in Southern California, ungaraged, and they all had holes in the body you could stick your fist through. And the cars that lived in desert areas, like mine, have excellent bodies, but the plastic parts used in the interior are just disintegrating in my fingers.

- Jim
I am aware of these things im just say original trim seems to be non existent period like the rocker moldings...I figured in places that don't have rust issues they would have at least survived on some but I always see the aftermarket ones
 

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The original Toyota sourced side mouldings had metal inserts that attached to the body with clips that passed through holes in the sheet metal. Later Toyota sourced side mouldings were supplied with double-sided adhesive.

The metal inserts in the mouldings rust away causing the older style to ripple. Even on an otherwise pristine car, the location of the poorly rustproofed inserts held water and the metal is in amazingly poor shape.

I don't know when the change over took place. I suspect that all original build cars used the metal inserts, but Toyota replacement trim at some point transitioned to the double sided adhesive.

https://www.celicasupra.com/forums/showthread.php?28576-All-Rubber-Moldings-(Side-Door-Hatch-Window)&highlight=double+sided+tape

https://www.celicasupra.com/forums/showthread.php?64101-Side-body-trim-newer-stuff-(84-)-need-part-number-Original-bad-2-OEM-types&highlight=double+sided+tape
 

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Seems like somebody at one point found after an exhaustive search some aftermarket side moulding material that he said was a dead ringer for the original shape, but was more flexible and came in roll so the only bad part was the ends you cut off to length were not like the originals. But I guess would be better than rusty, or too thin. I looked for that thread and couldn't find it, maybe I'm remembering something from way back in the email listserv days. Anyone remember that?
 

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Iirc the stick-on came along around 1994.

And Phil, i think the roll that some purchased and sell in lenght were the the seat chrome back trims.

For the side molding, I've never read about a near perfect match. All aftermarket stuff were all to thin. Some had acceptable width, but thickness has always been the main issue.
 

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Iirc the stick-on came along around 1994.

And Phil, i think the roll that some purchased and sell in lenght were the the seat chrome back trims.

For the side molding, I've never read about a near perfect match. All aftermarket stuff were all to thin. Some had acceptable width, but thickness has always been the main issue.
For the seat back chrome, it was 7/16" door edge guard and it doesn't go around the tight bends at the bottom very good without buckling. But I could have sworn somebody posted that they found some side molding that was a dead ringer but then when the subject came up again some years later with somebody else trying to find some, at that point it the conversation turned to all that could be found being too thin. Maybe the original purchaser was over selling what they'd found or maybe it was already out of production.
 

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I bought a roll (a couple, actually) of the "seat trim" stuff on eBay. It looks very close to OEM. The "buckling" problem can be reduced using a heat gun as you work it into place, along with a few carefully placed "pinks" cut in the trim where it wraps around the seat back.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I bought a roll (a couple, actually) of the "seat trim" stuff on eBay. It looks very close to OEM. The "buckling" problem can be reduced using a heat gun as you work it into place, along with a few carefully placed "pinks" cut in the trim where it wraps around the seat back.
have a link? what about the rubber moulding stuff people used can that be purchased too? I wonder what the market would be for reproduction molding?
 

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I repainted my car in the mid '90's when my daughter went off to college and could not take her car on campus. At that time I ordered new side molding from Toyota, and it was solid hard rubber and used 3M double-sided tape for attaching. It is identical to the original type with the metal core. Two years ago when some rust issues began popping up and I wanted to nip it in the bud I stripped off the old molding and ordered new from Toyota again. By then the molding ahead of the door on both sides was NLA. So I decided to try to restore the those pieces. I began by carefully trimming the old adhesive off. I then wet sanded them with successive grits of 400, 600, 1000, and 1500 wet or dry sandpaper. Then I polished them up with swirl remover. 3 M double sided tape was applied and they were ready to be installed on the car. They came out looking perfect, and cannot be distinguished from the new pieces on the doors and rear quarters without very close examination.

So, yes the later Toyota factory replacement was stick-on, and if you have it or can get it, the stick-on can be revived and made to look very good or even perfect depending on how bad it is to begin with. Perhaps the door sections take more abuse and may be gouged out badly, but can be made to at least look much better. Photo to follow.

Bob
 

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Sorry, bought it several years ago. If I can find the bags they're in I'll see if there's a vendor/seller name on them, or maybe the receipt is still in the bag. If I can easily find the info I'll post it here. Otherwise you'll have to go through the threads about repairing your seat backs to find the dimensions, and look for it.

No idea about what's been used for the side moldings. Mine are in very nice condition, so I haven't had to look into finding a replacement.

One thing owning this car has taught me is patience. You can't just go to some website and order everything you need, like for a lot of cars these days. You have to learn how to search this website, see what others have done, and go from there. Even "easily adaptable" stuff is hard to find these days, and some of the sources listed in the old threads have dried up, websites have disappeared, and we're having to modify other aftermarket things to use on our cars.
 

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Not sure how much you can tell from this photo, but here it is. On the left is new door molding, and on the right is restored Toyota replacement stick on-molding.
 

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Not sure how much you can tell from this photo, but here it is. On the left is new door molding, and on the right is restored Toyota replacement stick on-molding.
Very nice. Where did you get the "new" molding from? Is it NOS, or a make-it-work aftermarket piece?

OOOPS...n/m. I just read the reply before you posted the picture.....

- Jim
 

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Yes, the old moldings can be restored like Bob described so long as the metal strip inside isn't rusted. I did several like that. I even took out some minor "dents" in the original type by working them from the back side. But I've had to toss out a few that had rust bubbles or had the end caps separated.

But I wonder if it might not be too difficult to make a cosmetic equivalent. I mean its just a strip of black material in a very simple shape. A professional cabinet maker could make a piece of wood molding like that in no time at all. Since they also mill and route cellular PVC boards, same as you buy blanks at Home Depot for outdoor trim, into custom molding shapes, then it might just be possible to do in your own back yard. I just watched a youtube video and it doesn't look difficult at all. They make the shape they want, which does open the cells, but they sand it with 320 grit, wipe it with acetone to smooth it and then coat it with a compatible paint (maybe SEM colorcoat in landau black). The finishing would be more work than shaping it. Just a matter of finding the right shape router bits. I don't need any of these moldings myself so it won't be my project, but maybe somebody who already has woodworking tools and experience, and who needs most of a whole set, might want to do a little more research and try it.
 

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I purchased the new replacement molding for the doors and rear quarters from Toyota around 2014. If they are still available, another option is to get an extra set of the rear moldings, and cut them down to use on the front. If you have a P-type, the cut ends will be hidden by the wheel well flares. The other ends have an ever so slight different angle than the fronts, but it would take a trained eye looking very close to tell the difference. Has anyone tried to purchase molding from Toyota lately?
 

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If I ever get back to "Project Blue Thunder"...I am going to try to figure out a way to reproduce the exact size and shape moldings. I've done a little mold making trial with fiberglass back when I had my shop in the early 2000's. I need to reproduce at least the door moldings as I failed to remove the moldings I had "temporarily" on my black '84 beater that was totaled from vandalism. :duh: The biggest challenge will be figuring out the combination of materials to make them similar. So far, my plan would be to produce a satin painted molding that wouldn't require constant "shining" like the rubber-like originals. What do you all think?
 

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I just noticed something since you mentioned "satin". I have been hoarding a NOS set of the stick-on replacement that I got from Toyota at least a decade ago but I'd never unwrapped them. My originals, always garaged and never been touched are most definitely NOT satin, but more of a semi-gloss. But I just unwrapped one of the replacements and yes, it could be described as "satin". Anyone else notice this? Or go about polishing up the replacements to look more like the originals? I guess that's what they would have had to do if they replaced only a fender after a wreck, otherwise they wouldn't match.
 
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