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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys,
I've been thinking about painting my supra (myself) and have a general idea of what I'm doing but I have a few questions. I will paint the car in my buddy's driveway up here in northern Arizona. The plan is to get a dual-action sander, rent an air compressor, buy a paint gun get a tent and some tarps to make a "painting booth", mask off areas with plastic and tape, and just go panel by panel over a couple of days. My car doesn't have any dents so I shouldn't have to bondo and from watching a couple hours of videos on painting cars the same way I have a pretty good idea of what I'm getting into.
To what I don't know, I figured out how to take off the door rubber bumper trim so I can just paint the whole panel when it comes to doors and fenders, but I don't know how to take off the spoiler on the hatch so I can paint that separately. I also don't know if I should take the panels off of the flip-up lights and paint those separately or if I should just leave those on and paint them like I'm doing any other panel. I will post a photo later but the black "trim" along my windows has peeled from the chrome metal underneath and cracked and I do not know the restore process on that either. And finally, I am trying to decide on what color to paint her. My thoughts are between 040 super white, 3A7 Terra Cotta, 202 Gloss Black, or the 2022 jeep wrangler snazzberry color. Any ideas, opinions, or help are very welcome. Thanks in advance!
 

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I've asked around at local car shows who painted people's show cars for them and just about 1/3rd of the time, they say the did it themselves in their garage at home. Now I haven't asked them how many "do-overs" it took to get it to perfection, but I know it CAN be done. I just haven't been brave enough to try again. My first DIY attempt was a tool box. I had bought a new red Ford truck and a refrigerator white tool box for the bed. I rigged up a makeshift spray booth in my garage, had a quart of enamel mixed to match the truck and I was so proud of myself for that first coat until I untaped the plastic sheeting and exited to find to my sheer horror that everything inside my garage was now pink, including me! I've only been brave enough since to do body work and spray a little primer. When I retire and build my barndominium, I want to set up a permanent spray booth and teach myself how to lay paint because its the most visible part of the restoration but also typically costs way more than the finished car is worth to have it done right professionally.

The second car I ever had painted was a 66 Mustang coupe in Wimbledon White way back in 1986, done in a 2-car garage, tho not by me. My dad knew a guy who worked in the body shop of the local Chevy dealer by day and painted cars in his garage on the side. I did all the body work, covering the repairs with rattle-can primer and got it all ready. I paid this guy I think it was $400 plus I had to go and buy the materials (he gave me a list) which I think it added up to about $125. That Mustang turned out fantastic. I sold it shortly after and I learned later through the local Mustang club that it had met an untimely end so I don't know how long it would have held up. It was just enamel, but it looked great.

Black will show every mistake that you make as an amateur. Metallic paints require some serious skill to, as they say, "lay" the flakes in the same proportion and in the same direction all over. You will be better off to start with white as your first attempt. If you do a solid color, you can get away with a lot more mistakes and lighter colors are more forgiving. For instance if you get a run in color coat, you can just sand it out and polish it away. A bug lands on it before it dries, you have a half a chance of being able to sand it out and polish it away. But any defect in a metallic coat, its sand the whole panel down to the primer and start over again. And if you don't do every little thing exactly the same as before, then that whole panel may not match. And if I remember right, Super White was a single-stage paint which would be much easier, saving you the step of laying a clear coat.

Something I suggest to look into......They make portable paint spray booths that are inflatable just like a bounce house that you'd rent for a children's party. They are designed so that the fans that inflate it also provide well-distributed and filtered air flow which is key to getting a good job and have clear vinyl windows all around because you need really good lighting to be able to see what you are doing. I'd call around and see if you could find a rental store that would rent you one of those inflatable spray booths. But I suggest some sort of skeletal support as a backup because if the power goes out while its drying and it deflates onto the wet paint, you're toast. But I keep thinking back to that red tool box and how nearly impossible it was to adequately seal up a bunch of plastic sheeting into a spray booth. I'm so meticulous about every little detail and it still leaked somewhere somehow by an unimaginable amount. I was lucky that all that pink had settled as just dry dust, but it was still an enormous clean-up job.

Good luck. Post pictures/videos and let us know how you get on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow, thank you so much. I had no idea the difficulty level metallic paint would bring so that's now off the table. I also never knew about inflatable painting booths. Unfortunately, in Flagstaff, there seems to be nowhere to rent those booths or rent a painting booth in general. Seems like it is all "professionals only" here. Thank you for your help and I'll definitely keep looking.
 

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Might be worth driving to Vegas or Pheonix to rent one of those IF you could find one there. I'm sure the drive time would be far less than the setup time to rig up your own makeshift spray booth, not to mention having a "sure thing".
 
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If you wish to do it the "right" way, you should remove everything you possibly can and paint it separately. This includes the sun roof, headlight covers, front and rear bumper covers, windshield and hatch window trim, and fender flares. Kbox has the trim material that goes on the fender flares. Raptor Racing has new sunroof seals. Also the belt moulding at the door windows, the drip mouldings, and the trim around the quarter windows should be removed.

I assume that by "door rubber bumper trim" you are referring to the side moulding that runs from front to back through the wheel well flares and on the doors. If yours are still original, they are held on by a sort of clip that goes into holes in the skin. Replacements are held on by double stick 3M tape. If yours are original, you should be able to pop them off using something like a flat scraper. If they are in acceptable condition, they can be restored by sanding lightly with 1000 grit wet/dry, then 1500, then 2000 grit, then polished with Turtle Wax swirl remover. Be very careful with the sanding, as there is a thin layer that you do not want to sand through. You are just trying to eliminate scuffs and light scratches. Any deep gouges you will just have to live with. If the metal backing is rusted, you will need to source replacement trim that is NLA. Use the search function and you will find a vendor who has set up for production of replica trim. Around 2015 replacement moulding for the door and rear quarters was still available. Not sure about now. If you would like the Toyota part numbers, send me a PM.

Sorry, I have no advice about the paint booth!

Bob
 

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I untaped the plastic sheeting and exited to find to my sheer horror that everything inside my garage was now pink, including me!
:D Send pictures!

On a more serious note, I don't know about your local situation, but even in my non-car-crazy corner of the world, we do have the occasional rent-a-shop, where you can rent a place in a workshop, including tools etc. Some of those also have a paint cabin available for rent. Might be worth asking around?
 

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I painted my car several years ago and found this forum write-up very helpful -
Project "Silver Bullet" -- Part 2
 

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I'm just wrapping up my own painting project. I was using a single stage metallic, and like pdupler said it was very challenging to spray correctly. When I sprayed wet enough to get gloss out of the single stage, I got mottling in the metallic. So I used the "drop coat / orientation coat / mist coat" technique and that worked great but then the finish was matte. I honestly never got it right. The fix was to sand it flat again, re-coat with the same single stage metallic and finish with a drop coat, then sprayed clear. For a driveway paintjob, I'll be able to live with it but I'm not going to win any car shows.

I set up a tent in the driveway. Just a cheap banquet tent I got off Amazon for $107. The scaffolding and joints are flimsy as all heck, and needs extra masking to keep paint from escaping, but it worked to keep 95% of the dirt out and 99% of the bugs.




When I do the Supra, I'll do base then clear. It's more expensive, but way more user friendly. If you're going to do single stage, I also recommend what pdupler said and stick to non-metallics. Almost as many ways to screw up a paint job than there are your marriage but if you do base color then clear, or non-metallic single stage at least you can fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I painted my car several years ago and found this forum write-up very helpful -
Project "Silver Bullet" -- Part 2
Juka, Just checked out this project, and dang! You put a lot of work into that supra and it shows. I was just curious about what you did with the front bumper. Specifically, the plastic that holds the blinkers and fog lights because I thought it was a softer plastic, and wouldn't 280 grit really tear that plastic up? at this point, I am painting the car super white and want to paint that bumper piece along with the rest of the car.

Thanks! -j4ckro
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm just wrapping up my own painting project. I was using a single stage metallic, and like pdupler said it was very challenging to spray correctly. When I sprayed wet enough to get gloss out of the single stage, I got mottling in the metallic. So I used the "drop coat / orientation coat / mist coat" technique and that worked great but then the finish was matte. I honestly never got it right. The fix was to sand it flat again, re-coat with the same single stage metallic and finish with a drop coat, then sprayed clear. For a driveway paintjob, I'll be able to live with it but I'm not going to win any car shows.

I set up a tent in the driveway. Just a cheap banquet tent I got off Amazon for $107. The scaffolding and joints are flimsy as all heck, and needs extra masking to keep paint from escaping, but it worked to keep 95% of the dirt out and 99% of the bugs.




When I do the Supra, I'll do base then clear. It's more expensive, but way more user friendly. If you're going to do single stage, I also recommend what pdupler said and stick to non-metallics. Almost as many ways to screw up a paint job than there are your marriage but if you do base color then clear, or non-metallic single stage at least you can fix it.
I was thinking of a similar solution since those inflatable structures are over 700 dollars but did not know if anyone had any success, nice to know someone has! Thanks for the input!

-j4ckro
 

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Just to clarify the Silver Bullet project was not mine but rather supraholics'. I used his write-up for education and inspiration for mine.
 

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The refered thread:
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Update:
After a couple of hours of going business to business, I found a booth rental and it's perfect! Ventilated and has air compressors I can use. 100 dollars for 12 hours and a 50-dollar down payment for clean-up. I was also able to locate an automotive paint shop with a guy who is helping me get the most bang for my buck. Between a gallon of each of, 040 super white paint, primer, and the top gloss coat, some cans of trim paint, and paper and tape he quoted me about 600 dollars. I still need a dual-action sander and a paint gun but that is a good start. Looking like I can get this done in under $1000 and a day's worth of labor.

I also went to an automotive window and trim store to try and see what I can do about the "black" plastic trim around the windows and he said that you can just buy new plastic pieces that just slide in? Don't quote me on that but I'm still trying to figure that bit out.

I'll definitely be posting pictures of the process or I can make a video if that would be better. I'm doing a steering pump swap this weekend and I can post a vid/pics of that too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The refered thread:
Gotcha, unfortunately, none of the photos that I think would be there are showing up.
 

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j4ckro wrote:
"I also went to an automotive window and trim store to try and see what I can do about the "black" plastic trim around the windows and he said that you can just buy new plastic pieces that just slide in? Don't quote me on that but I'm still trying to figure that bit out."

Are you referring to the front windshield trim? If so I bet the guy is talking about universal trim. If you have the original trim still on there you can refinish.

Peel all the plastic bits off, sand 320 and 400 grit, prime with a self etching primer and then hit it with black trim paint like Mar-Hyde semi gloss or Transstar Semi-gloss or Matte.
20922
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
j4ckro wrote:
"I also went to an automotive window and trim store to try and see what I can do about the "black" plastic trim around the windows and he said that you can just buy new plastic pieces that just slide in? Don't quote me on that but I'm still trying to figure that bit out."

Are you referring to the front windshield trim? If so I bet the guy is talking about universal trim. If you have the original trim still on there you can refinish.

Peel all the plastic bits off, sand 320 and 400 grit, prime with a self etching primer and then hit it with black trim paint like Mar-Hyde semi gloss or Transstar Semi-gloss or Matte. View attachment 20922
Oh ok I didnt know if I should’ve peeled it off and painted it or gotten new black trim pieces. If anyone has a part number or link for the plastic trim that would be sick. This is what I’m dealing with….
Automotive tire Hood Grey Automotive lighting Wood

Hood Automotive lighting Asphalt Automotive exterior Automotive tire
 

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You won't find new ones. Refinish those. Peel, then Etch primer is your friend, followed by a high build, sand to shape, paint with trim paint. I haven't done mine yet but I fully expect it to take 4 to 50 hours lol
 

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The belt mouldings at the bottom of the side glass (that's what Toyota calls them) are on the list of what we call "Holy Grail" items. Unless your Supra was garaged from new, your belt mouldings are going to be deteriorated like that. The best you can do right now is to peel off the laminate, etch and paint. But there's not much you can do about the rubber wiper strip. That rubber strip is what keeps your door cavity from filling with water when it rains or when you wash the car. At this age, they are all hard as a rock but can still do the job unless there's chuncks missing out of it, in which case you need to find replacements.

What somebody needs to do is to find some sort of rubber strip with close enough to the same profile that you could cut off the old rubber strip and glue on a replacement. Maybe there's a rubber strip like that in a parts catalog of some other modern or classic vehicle for which reproductions are made, maybe even part of a shower door or vinyl window assembly that could be re-purposed. Ideally one would find something we could buy by the roll or by the foot. I keep wishing for one of our retired members with plenty of time and imagination (you'd have to think way outside the box) would take up the cause.
 

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If there are no cracks in the rubber wiper strip you can soften it up with Simple Green cleaner. You'll need to spray it full strength and wrap it carefully in plastic wrap making sure to keep the plastic wrap flat and in contact. Squeegee it flat, get the air bubbles out.
I have soaked things for weeks like this and soften them up. Most recently a set of hood bumpers.
Brown Wood Circle Button Metal

Wood Gas Metal Audio equipment Auto part

Brown Wood Liver Jewellery Natural material

Green Grass Gas Tints and shades Art


As an added sided effect it will remove rust from steel parts too.

Tire Automotive tire Wood Rim Wheel

Glove Gesture Personal protective equipment Human leg Auto part

Household hardware Automotive tire Fastener Wood Audio equipment


They cleaned up nicely
 

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Simple Green, really? I use a lot of that stuff for parts cleaning, but never soaked any rubber parts like that. I'll have to try it.
 
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