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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the most fragile component is our cars electronics is the Igniter module.
If it overheats, you will be stuck on the side of the road. (happend to me in 1990)
The Igniter is not repairable, so a little preventive maintenance is surely a very good idea.
The fact that they are rare to find and very expensive makes it even more of a good idea.
This simple process applies to all years of the 5, 6, and 7MGE (non turbo) engines.
Mine is a 89620-14361, but the same applies to any variations, as it is mainly the connectors
and mounting tabs that change from one to another.
After removing it from the car, bring to a worktable for the work.
Remove the mountings plate, 4 phillips screws, and just to be safe, identify which side the wires (FILS) comes out of the case
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once open, you will have the electronic module right there. simply undo the 3 phillips screws and flip out the module.
It will be a bit sticky to the case, as the old compound will be holding it there. Notice on mine that it was already getting dry, as you can see
a 'sheet' of compound on the lower part tearing off on removal:
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First, notice the thickness of the compound material there, it will give you a good idea of how much is needed to add.

Wipe off and clean both surfaces of this old dryed up compound.
I used a CPUcomputer tube compound that was well rated on gaming PC forums (info from my kids!)
Apparently the Silver ones are a bit better than the older White ones.

Pretty much any tube you will buy will have moore than enough.


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Apply some on the back of the module place, and use for example an old credit card to spread it evently on the entire surface.
The idea here is to have about same thinkness as what was there, and most important, is to be regular in the thickness.
You don't want air pockets in there when you will re-assemble.

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When you will put the electronic module back in the case, just wiggle it a little to smooths out the compound even more before securing it with the 3 screws.
Just be carefull with your fingers not to touch the compound. If you do, re-spread it evently !
Reassemble parts in reverse order.
Before re-installation in the car, I would highly suggest that you make sure the mounting tabs of the assembly, and the mating locations on the car are clean and free from
rust or corrosion. For the module to work properly, it must have a good ground.

Hope you will get many more miles / kilometers from your module after this preventive maintenance !
 

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Did this last year with mine, good write-up! Isopropyl alcohol worked well as a cleaner for me to get the old paste off. I chose Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut as my paste, though I'm sure any of the popular brands would be better than the dried up funk that's been in there for decades... Something I read in a number of CPU posts was to keep the layer very thin, and consistent. More is not better.
 

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Fantastic info, thanks so much for the time and trouble to post this! I'm fairly new (at 55 years old) to the Mk2s as far as working on them goes. But, when I got a used (and luckily good) igniter off Ebay, I was fortunate enough to have already read up on the need for heat sink compound. Can't hurt, even on a used one.

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I posted about this back in 2015:

#6 · Nov 6, 2015
"I think another killer of these is the internal heat. The case has generous fins to dissipate the heat from the internal electronics which had a heat sink grease compound originally to help conduct the heat. If you remove the back cover and unscrew the transistor body from the case you will find that the original application of this compound has basically dried up and is no longer as effective as was intended. A good cleaning and reapplication of new heat sink grease will go a long way in protecting your ignitor from an early demise."

Thanks for taking the time to do a proper write up and spread the word!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yep! I just made a step by step diy with pics, of what was already known. But some people with less experience might not do it without proper guidance 😂
 
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The write up helps and inspired me to deal with mine. Thanx
 
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Thanks. I ordered Thermal Grizzly and will be doing this on my Igniter as soon as I get it. Hopefully the igniter will go on for another 20 years.
 
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