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GOOD JOB!!!!!:thumbsup:
Just grease the tapered part of the tie rod end and gently tap it into place.
Be sure that the threads and not damaged,first.A little oil will help to lube the threads,first.
You may need to use a thread file to the threads.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Thread-Repair-Restoration-File-Teeth-Correction-Metric-Hardware-Mini-DIY-Tools-/372349145095
Unless you have some metric DIES.
Use an impact gun to get 'er down,carefully. Even an electric one will work fine.
I have a 12 V. one that does OK.
 

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Discussion Starter #122
Threads seem fine, nut will go up and down the whole length. Only have standard dies in this household, no metric sadly.
I just hadn't thought to tap it in with a SFH before trying to screw it in.
Ball joint seems to be in great shape, old grease looked bad though, so I repacked it with some synthetic grease and slapped the new boot on.
 

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Discussion Starter #124
I have an off the shelf 2 jaw puller that works great on the tie rod ends.
My three jaw puller worked very well on the rear control arms. Though I hate it, most frustrating tool I've ever used in my life. The amount of force required to separate the tie rod ends was phenomenal, I doubt any puller would have worked.

Any inputs on installing poly bushings? it seems some you need the old metal sleeve around them and some you don't. Just go by what fits I guess?

Off the top of my head, the subframes don't seem to need the sleeve, but the control arms front and rear seem to need the sleeve.
 

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Discussion Starter #125
POR15 coating on parts seems serviceable even if it's not applied ideally... I think it will be fine. Pressed in some new bushings today

Also just noticed some weirdness I'm not sure how I didn't spot until today. There seems to be a dent in the front frame rail inside the engine bay. My guess is since this car has had a 1J swap before it got donked during a engine pull out- put in. I'm not super worried about it but should I be? I guess I'll measure some of the reference distances given in the TSRM and make sure they're all kosher.


 

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Yup that looks like some BFH clearancing there.

Bushings, depends on the brand. Some come with new sleeves, some don't. Raptor took care of that at one point and someone made some before, I believe that was for the Energy Suspension bushings. The SuperPros come with them as I recall.
 

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Discussion Starter #127
Bushings fit pretty easy. I used a neighbors press to install them which was so much easier. The LCA bushing comes with this donut that I think I know where it goes but I'm not positive.

I need a new boot for the ball joint connection for the steering arm. Energy generic boot fits the smaller tie rod joint, but I'm not sure what my options are for the bigger one that is wired on.

The ball itself seems fine, no play, but there was no zerk fitting installed on the bottom which means the chocolate pudding I cleaned off the joint was probably factory grease. Gonna install a fitting and pump it full of synthetic and hopefully force out the majority of the old grease, just need a boot.
 

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New ball joint boots and the wires are still available new from Toyota. And the deal on the grease fittings IIRC, is that Toyota recommended installing them to grease the ball joints and then reinstalling the plug. That would certainly prevent them being damaged relatively easily from road debris or driving over a curb or something similar and bottoming out.
On the ES front LCA bushings, there's a design flaw. Compared to the OEM bushings that also hold the arm in position front to back, installing the ES bushings into the OEM shell and then installing their "thrust washer" on the rear side doesn't totally take up all the space between the arm and its mounting flange, which allow the arm to move front to back some. NOT GOOD. I sent many pics and measurements to ES and their product manager stated that they'd been selling them for years and no one had reported any problems? He finally offered to send me a second set of thrust washers to try. Unfortunately, 2 together was a bit too thick and they almost instantly worked as out of position as possible away from each other. I finally decided that the proper solution was to have 5mm thick aluminum "spacers" made with the ID to fit over the rear of the OEM shell and OD a little larger than their provided thrust washer. Problem totally solved. At the time, it wasn't much more expensive to have 6 sets of them made than 1 or 2, and I knew that others would need them as well. They're long since gone but easily remade. Everyone that installed them said they were the perfect fix for the flawed design.
Why did I go to all the trouble of trying to deal directly with ES? Because it was the right thing to do to solve the problem. Unfortunately it was like arguing with rocks and negotiating with terrorists. The only real reason I bothered at all is because their bushing are the only ones that aren't so rock hard that they could easily be mistaken for solid metal ones. They're a nice upgrade from even new OEM rubber without a huge ride and noise penalty.
 

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Discussion Starter #129
New ball joint boots and the wires are still available new from Toyota. And the deal on the grease fittings IIRC, is that Toyota recommended installing them to grease the ball joints and then reinstalling the plug. That would certainly prevent them being damaged relatively easily from road debris or driving over a curb or something similar and bottoming out.
On the ES front LCA bushings, there's a design flaw. Compared to the OEM bushings that also hold the arm in position front to back, installing the ES bushings into the OEM shell and then installing their "thrust washer" on the rear side doesn't totally take up all the space between the arm and its mounting flange, which allow the arm to move front to back some. NOT GOOD. I sent many pics and measurements to ES and their product manager stated that they'd been selling them for years and no one had reported any problems? He finally offered to send me a second set of thrust washers to try. Unfortunately, 2 together was a bit too thick and they almost instantly worked as out of position as possible away from each other. I finally decided that the proper solution was to have 5mm thick aluminum "spacers" made with the ID to fit over the rear of the OEM shell and OD a little larger than their provided thrust washer. Problem totally solved. At the time, it wasn't much more expensive to have 6 sets of them made than 1 or 2, and I knew that others would need them as well. They're long since gone but easily remade. Everyone that installed them said they were the perfect fix for the flawed design.
Why did I go to all the trouble of trying to deal directly with ES? Because it was the right thing to do to solve the problem. Unfortunately it was like arguing with rocks and negotiating with terrorists. The only real reason I bothered at all is because their bushing are the only ones that aren't so rock hard that they could easily be mistaken for solid metal ones. They're a nice upgrade from even new OEM rubber without a huge ride and noise penalty.
Excellent, I'll have to call some dealerships with a part number from the book. I had assumed they'd be disco'd so I tried to order a generic one that looked close... it was not close.

Thanks for the heads up on that bushing I was actually wondering about that myself. I'll look for some sort of washer that fit those specs as a spacer.



Here's the washer and here is how I assume it's supposed to be installed



Definitely not flush. Here is the other side



Much more contact area between the bushing and bracket on the front subframe. It would probably work without that "washer" but it would wear quicker.

Also eyeballed some ES end link grommets for the rear.... too big



the outer diameter isn't an issue so I made up a jig and I'm going to cut them down to size with a miter saw to make sure they're flat



I'll also have to chamfer the nipple so it fits better in the RCA.
 

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That's where the thrust washer indeed should be installed. If it was the correct thickness, it would be flush with the end of the bushing and sleeve on the back side to keep the arm from being able to move front to back. The spacer you'll need will fit between the outside of the thrust washer and the rear mounting tab. Before I had the spacers made, I kept trying different combinations of big ass washers to prove the concept. I finally found a combination that together were perfect, greased everything big time and tried it out for a couple of weeks.
There's an angled, sloped rubber railroad crossing in the middle of a curve where a couple of roads cross over, one above on a bridge and the other below. Hitting that nearly always had been a complete guessing game as to exactly which direction the car would dart. The first couple of times, it surprised the f(iretr)uck out of me. Fortunately, I still have razor quick reaction time. Otherwise, I'd surely have gone off the road for sure a couple of times. Then I'd expect something to happen and be ready for it. Installing the spacers on the front LCA bushings vastly changed things. It would nearly always dart there, but it was pretty much the same every time. Just like on road race cars where a bit of toe out really helps when initiating turn in for corners, but can sometimes make hard braking a little well... butt puckering. So I dialed in a bit more toe in. Then after a while, a little more. And other than the cars tendency to follow the stupid grooves worn in all the roads here because they allow studded tires from November to April, just so the idiot drivers here can get to work the 2 or 3 days we might get snow every year. Then they have to grind down and completely repave everything every few years. It would be a zillion times better and at least that many times cheaper to simply pay those fum ducks to stay home those 2 - 3 days.
I think the reason ES thinks that these are OK is because nobody seems to figure out what to do with a thrust washer that doesn't seem to fit anywhere and nearly always just leaves them out. The perceived "improvement" in handling is very likely just because it's different than with the worn out OEM rubber bushings and these are supposed to be better, so what's happening now simply has to be better, right? I've seen these installed on a few other cars and not one of them had the thrust washers and the needed spacers to keep the arm properly in place. I took a couple of them apart and there was noticeable wear both on the inside and outside of the bushings from the arm moving back and forth, actually front to back that was definitely not symmetrical. It was worn in an odd sort of semi spiral way more on the outside but some inside as well.
So have those spacers machined and the few $'s it cost you will be way, way more than worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #131
New ball joint boots and the wires are still available new from Toyota. And the deal on the grease fittings IIRC, is that Toyota recommended installing them to grease the ball joints and then reinstalling the plug. That would certainly prevent them being damaged relatively easily from road debris or driving over a curb or something similar and bottoming out.
On the ES front LCA bushings, there's a design flaw. Compared to the OEM bushings that also hold the arm in position front to back, installing the ES bushings into the OEM shell and then installing their "thrust washer" on the rear side doesn't totally take up all the space between the arm and its mounting flange, which allow the arm to move front to back some. NOT GOOD. I sent many pics and measurements to ES and their product manager stated that they'd been selling them for years and no one had reported any problems? He finally offered to send me a second set of thrust washers to try. Unfortunately, 2 together was a bit too thick and they almost instantly worked as out of position as possible away from each other. I finally decided that the proper solution was to have 5mm thick aluminum "spacers" made with the ID to fit over the rear of the OEM shell and OD a little larger than their provided thrust washer. Problem totally solved. At the time, it wasn't much more expensive to have 6 sets of them made than 1 or 2, and I knew that others would need them as well. They're long since gone but easily remade. Everyone that installed them said they were the perfect fix for the flawed design.
Why did I go to all the trouble of trying to deal directly with ES? Because it was the right thing to do to solve the problem. Unfortunately it was like arguing with rocks and negotiating with terrorists. The only real reason I bothered at all is because their bushing are the only ones that aren't so rock hard that they could easily be mistaken for solid metal ones. They're a nice upgrade from even new OEM rubber without a huge ride and noise penalty.
Hey Ray do you remember the exact spacer dimension you had made?

I gotta put together a machine shop list here in a few.
So those spacers 5mm tall x ?ID x ?OD seems like ideally you would have the spacers stepped to fit the step in the thrust washer.

My measurements for the spacer would be about 14 mm tall, inside diameter at 30, outside diameter starts at 40 and then after 9.5mm shrinks to 35.

And some sleeves for the rear suspension.
Rear suspension is a clusterf. Looks like I need sleeves for the toe brackets, my measurements are 24mm OD 14mm ID x 70mm long but I need to double check other's findings, that will fit the bigger energy bushings, which are the correct toe bracket length ~70mm (70.7 on one side 69.33 on the other one side has some wiggle room the other kinda doesn't fit right now).

For the outer brackets, the stock fixed ones are about 65 mm which matches up with about 65mm for the weld in adjustable bracket. Cutting the flanges off the stock TOE sleeve results in a sleeve which matches the shorter 65 mm Energy bushing in both length, and Diameter ~19mm and of course matches the diameter of the stock eccentric bolt, as I will be using the parts car Toe bolt as a camber bolt.

Here's a video of the play in the rack ends, not sure if it warrants replacement of the joints or not.

https://youtu.be/kgpfhnjGuIA

Here's some pictures of the inner parts of the rack


 

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I just did the inner ends on my 86 last summer, first set I ever had to do. Was super easy... after I made a custom wrench to hold them. But some huge imperial thing that was just a touch smaller, opened it up and ground it down. Total PITA to do without it.

Dang, I wish I could remember what I did for my front LCA bushings. I of course ran into the exact same problem, but I know I solved it without having anything machined and I don't have any slop. I may have just cut them down to match the outside bushing ring heights installed (with the ring installed), and then added some washers to make up for what I cut down, I don't think I crushed the arm further. I need to look at my pics, I never covered any of that work in my build thread.

Like I said for the rear control arm bushings, you could just use the SuperPros, pretty sure they come with the new sleeves.
 

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Discussion Starter #133
I just did the inner ends on my 86 last summer, first set I ever had to do. Was super easy... after I made a custom wrench to hold them. But some huge imperial thing that was just a touch smaller, opened it up and ground it down. Total PITA to do without it.

Dang, I wish I could remember what I did for my front LCA bushings. I of course ran into the exact same problem, but I know I solved it without having anything machined and I don't have any slop. I may have just cut them down to match the outside bushing ring heights installed (with the ring installed), and then added some washers to make up for what I cut down, I don't think I crushed the arm further. I need to look at my pics, I never covered any of that work in my build thread.

Like I said for the rear control arm bushings, you could just use the SuperPros, pretty sure they come with the new sleeves.
I guess I should just source some new inner ends and replace them while everything is apart and it's there. bleh

yeah I wish I could go back in time and buy the superpros vs these energy ones. But I already have enough from the energy suspension ones, and accidentally bought two of them to boot.

I ran to the local machine shop today, they're gonna cut the flanges off the stock toe sleeves to make them the new camber sleeves and should call me back with a quote on a pair of sleeves and a pair of spacers. I don't think it will be prohibitively expensive.

Got a pneumatic grease gun set up today and shot the ball bearings under the strut on the LCA. So much old grease to purge, and the ball still moves super stiffly, but there's no play in it so... I'll see how it feels after I get the new boot on it and fill er up.



Also boxed up my strut casings to ship all the way to Californy way for the T3 coilover conversion.



Here were the front strut cores... I assume they're stock, but one is from Colombia and one from Venezuela ?

 

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Discussion Starter #136
Went to get the parts from the machine shop... They had some uh, incorrect measurements. I like the guy, and he has a couple mazda 323 GTXs which are sweet, so I'd like to give him my future business but that is a little annoying.

Also decided on the Nissan z32 from calipers for brakes. Can't decide between MPV rotors or Z32 rotors, I assume the z32 will give more options from nice brands so most likely going with those.

For the longer wheel studs, I found another thread that says you can get longer ones from Dorman # 98521 or 610414 same part different #s. Will those be long enough or is another option necessary?
 

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The spacers I had made were to use with the ES provided thrust washers. So 5mm thickness was perfect. The same could be done with a couple of different washers, which is how I initially came up with the required thickness. The ID was to just fit over the OD of the rear side of the original OEM bushing shell and I made their OD just slightly larger than the thrust washer OD and so it would fit in the mounting flange.
I went with the MPV rotors and Q45 calipers because they matched, that is the thickness of the rotor matched what the calipers were designed for. I would recommend the same with the Z32 stuff. IIRC, the calipers came in 3 different versions for 3 different thickness rotors which I believe are 26mm, 28mm and 30mm, but you should verify exactly what you have and match accordingly to avoid any potential issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #138 (Edited)
Got spacers made for the F control arms, fit pretty well. However.... the rear sleeves don't fit quite as well. There is some play between the bolt and the metal sleeve. Granted the stock sleeve also has play in it, but not to this extent.

I guess my question would be, since the sleeve is clamped in the bracket and held pretty firmly, and the rotation of parts is a movement on the steel/poly/steel interface; how important is it really if the sleeve is super snug on the bolt. It's snug, but not super snug.
bolt* OD ~14mm sleeve ID ~15mm
 

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Discussion Starter #139
More updates;
Got a welder set up, right now it's just running flux core. When I do body work I'll switch to MIG with thinner wire.
I did a couple practice welds and then decided to jump in over my head and stitch weld the shock tower cause why not. The welds don't look great, as it's like my second time welding, but as long as I don't cut a hole the shock tower is already kind of welded together as is to it seemed like some low risk practice. It's uh, not pretty but whatever. I can only get better.


Also on my way over to the over tower I decided to take off the front crash bar finally. Unfortunately this is what two of the bolts look like, the more rearward of them.



Not a great sign. Gotta find a way to peek on in there.

Ordered some Z32 calipers and they came a bit too... well loved for my taste, so I'm swapping for a pair he has in better shape. It's my own fault for not paying attention to the pictures well enough on FleaBay

I have perfect aim when I'm shooting myself in the foot that's for sure.
 

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Those bolts always seem to get rusty, just so easy for moisture to get trapped in there.

Grind those welds down and get some more practice, can only get better the more you try right?
 
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