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Discussion Starter #141
Baby due? I fully expect numerous "for sale" ads up shortly.


:)
Nah. I got rid of most of my extra junk over the last 5 years. Got a couple cars I wasn't planning on keeping long term I will be dealing with this year, but none of the keepers will be on the slate. I just need to get a couple of them dealt with before my time becomes scarce. Just trying to get one done right now that I picked up last year to fix and sell. Looking forward to getting some work into my black 86 though, that's for sure.

Thanks for the congrats guys!
 

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Discussion Starter #142
Well, time to catch up on some really old stuff. Life has been a little crazy in the last couple years and I’m way behind. My last photos posted here were of my hood latches and vents, which I believe I finished installing early 2013. I started on a post for it eons ago, then my old laptop died, and I got busy. I’ll cover whatever is still relevant now.

AeroCatch Topmount Latches on a CFX carbon hood





So I needed hood latches. Most of you guys with the Advan hoods don’t. Weight loss was my primary motivation when I had the CFX hoods made back in the early 2000s. Mine weighs 13lbs. The exterior skin is a single layer of carbon cloth, you can see the exposed carbon on the underside. I love it, but the downside is the hood flexes at really high speeds. The corners behind the headlights would lift at highway speeds. The Advan hoods are not so paltry, they use layers of fiberglass on the inside to help with rigidity. I wouldn’t bother with latches with them to be honest, but I certainly needed them. At the time the Aerocatch latches were pretty new, these days they have become the standard. It’s a very elegant solution to an old problem (traditional latches are ugly, unsecure and often lead to damaged hoods).
My choice in mount location gets lots of questions and raised eyebrows.



My criteria for putting them where I did is 3 fold. One, the main reason is that it was the corners that were lifting and I have retained the stock hood latch (which is why I didn’t need the locking Aerocatch latches), so my latches needed to be located somewhere that would fix this problem. Two, I’ve seen a lot of hood latch installs and people often put them near the headlights as the upper rad support is an easy place to mount the studs and often people are using latches in place of the stock center latch. The downside of this location is there is a lot of bracing on the underside of hoods in that area and you are forced to butcher the bracing on the underside to make room for the body of the latches. With an out of production rarity such as my hood (it’s also the first CFX carbon hood ever made), minimal modification was the name of the game. Last, not only did I not want to modify my hood more than necessary, I didn’t want to make any permanent mods to the chassis if need be. Turns out there are a bunch of pre-existing holes around the strut towers and luckily placing the latches there provided the needed rigidity.

For my install method, I decided to locate the latches first, then build the brackets. The Areocatches come with a template sheet out of the box. I used it to make a couple stencils for the cut and drill points. I laid down some tape over the general areas I wanted them, then very very carefully positioned the two stencils with bits of tape, measured left to right, top to bottom like a gazillion times, and kept adjust them till they were exactly mirrored left to right. Then trace the stencils to the tape, and start cutting and drilling! Once the latches were in I was able to hang the studs from them and get a fairly decent idea of the shape the brackets needed to be.
Here they are after all the metal work…



So to make these I booted up SolidWorks, pushed some pixels around and then sent the files down to the cnc laser cutter…. Not! Nope, not this guy, I don’t have access to such goodies (in yo face Mike! :naughty:). I measured very carefully, made some templates, and used zip discs on a grinder and die grinder to make the cuts, and then a ton of filing! Truth be told I had to redo one from scratch, I didn’t get the stud mount location quite right the first time. Here they are painted…



I wanted to powder coat them to match all my other charcoal PCed bits but I decided to wait till I had some more to send off so it’s just a bit of enamel and clear for now.



I’m not going to say how long it took to finish the metal work lol. But these photos are not photoshopped! (Aaron, always an ass).

And installed (all using factory holes, no mods to the car at all)…






North American Celica All Trac ST185 Hood Vent Install

Next up, hood vents. I’ve wanted some for eons. I love inline 6s, but they make a lot of heat and it needs to go somewhere. ALL generations of Supras suffer from heatsoak from the factory! Oddly enough, the original Celicas from the 70s had them built into the oem hoods. Why Toyota saw fit to equip those cars with them and then not include them in later years when they stuffed a big inline six under the hood, I’ll never know. Problem though, I didn’t want dripping water draining over my engine and I didn’t want some cheap, poor quality, plastic ebay type junk on my baby. I set the bar at Toyota quality levels and go up from there. Luckily, Toyota was the answer, I just had to look at a different gen of Celica. I’ve been hanging out with a lot of Celica All-Trac (aka GT-Fours) owners in recent years at Run of the Ogopogo! An awesome all generation celica meet in the interior of BC we do every year in August, it’s always a riot. It turns out there’s a lot of different All-Tracs made over the years, with significant variations between USDM and JDM models and special editions, but they all show up at Ogopogo every year and they all have a lot of openings in their hoods! I determined that the regular North American ST185 89-93 had vents that met my qualifications and would look good on my car. So now the only problem was landing a set. Which is quite a problem as these cars are stupid rare. They only had to sell enough to homologate them, they are bonofide WRC rally cars sold in dealerships so Toyota could race them in the big leagues. Luckily, I know people. I had a buddy with a parts one and the hood was damaged so he was willing to sell them. Here they are with the paint stripped off…



Turns out they are cast aluminum! I wasn’t really expecting that, and they are definitely heavier then I would like but the quality was so good and they’re just so neat that I decided to just live with it (I’m a weight weenie, what can I say). I got all the hardware and the little screens they come with too but I wasn’t going to need any of that the way I was going to be installing them. You see these are flush mounted in the Celica hoods, they have indents in them so they can sit flush. Obviously with a carbon hood a flush mount was out of the question, but having them sit on top wasn’t a problem (and helped with the leakage issue). I did however have to modify them slightly to work this way…




The top one was still unmodded there. I removed the studs and filed the stud hole embossings flush. On the Celica the studs were used for mounting, and the tapped holes for attaching the little grills on the underside. I would not be using the grills, but I wanted to retain the tapped holes for something else I had in mind.

Now I just had to decide where to put them. The general area was obvious, but I had to consider potential clearance issues with my battery and throttle body, and I was very concerned about drainage. It would be impossible to keep water from getting under the hood while washing. This may seem like an insignificant issue to most, but when you’ve put as much work into polishing and money into coatings as I have, it’s a big deal! My final solution for this problem is to make some drip trays that attach on the inside with little holes in them that strategically drop the water directly to the ground but unfortunately I still haven’t gotten around to making them and every car wash right now involves a quick wipe down of the engine bay. These trays will double as my mounting brackets too, so I have some temporary onese quickly fabbed up for the interim. This is where the vents they will go…



And here is the final cut marks after making another stencil and another gazillion measurements.



And the most nerve wracking part, the cuts…





Minimal stuff to drip on, but close enough to the bits that I want to pull heat from to be effective.

Test fit!



And before I did the final install, I added a little adhesive heat reflector\insulation to protect my hood from header heat…



I was very happy how this ended up looking. I can’t stand hood blankets. That amount of protection from radiant heat is overkill, you only need it around the actual heat emitter itself. Everywhere else it just blankets the motor and prevents any heat transfer through the metal hood and your motor just suffocates more. That said, I probably could have made this patch of reflector larger, the hood still gets a touch hotter to the touch then I’d like above the motor.
And here is a vent with the final finish, a bead of silicone in between and installed…



I went with my usual Plastikote Rollbar Epoxy paint in gloss black. This stuff is super durable and goes on really smooth. I figured paint chips were pretty likely even powder coated, so better to coat them in something I can actually glass bead off and recoat then deal with removing damaged powder coat from them one day.

Oh, and one more little deal I was meaning to take care of for awhile, proper Allan head machine screws for my vent block off plate, in stainless of course. Had some temporary ones in there before that weren’t suitable.



And voila, the finished product…




And the shot from Ogopogo on the previous page...


Ahhh that's better, now I can hang out with All-Trac guys without experiencing hood junk envy :)

I have a ton of suspension work to cover on this car yet, but there is more on the way this year so I’ll wait till that’s done and I'll put my spare time towards bringing up to date the threads on the other cars I’ve been restoring the last several years. Thanks for reading!
 

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The amount of flex i get on my advan cf hood was enough for me to run quik latches. It still flexes enough for the gf to ask if it is on right, so i'm tempted to put the oem hood back on for a road trip so i don't have to hear about it. I might have to steal your idea and put some heat reflective stuff on that side of the hood, i've got a funny picture of the hood bracing being visible as the only part not quite hot enough to burn off the light mist i was driving through.

Nice work as always. I always tell people i use CAD(cardboard assisted design) for the stuff i make. Love the little details on your car.
 

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Discussion Starter #144
Ha ha, that's good, I'll have to use that. Long time CAD user myself, that's for sure. Not that I wouldn't like to be able to use real cad and such, I just don't have access to that kind of work flow. I've made due ok without so far.
 

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Yeah my Advan hood flex is what prompted me to do the quiklatches also. The hood "breathes" too much with the temperature, and is an annoyance when cold since the latches dont want to cooperate unless the hood is flat (when warm), so the heat shielding is out for me since I like it when the hood heats up lol
 

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Discussion Starter #147

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Discussion Starter #148
TriMill Header and Timing Assembly Lightening

Hey all, time for an update. I did this batch of work to my 86 last spring in preparation for the PacNW Nationals that was held up here that year, but then we had a baby immediately after so I’ve been a weee bit busy since.

So I hadn’t done much to my motor since the beginning of this thread, and a Nationals event brings with it a good opportunity to dyno. Plus my constantly evolving suspension has gotten me to a point again where on the autox course I felt like I could make use of more power. I know where I’m going to get my biggest gains with this motor (engine internals), but I didn’t have the time for that and I had left a few low hanging fruit on the vine. One of the mods I was going to do was finally get myself a grind of the TRD cams from Colt Cams here in Vancouver (they duplicated SupraZ’s original set of TRD cams many years ago), as I thought it might fill in a hole in my power band. Here’s my previous dyno…



Besides more power, one of my goals was to try and raise my torque curve on the top end a little bit (your torque curve mirror’s your cars acceleration curve, while your HP curve doesn’t mean much). The TRD cams are fairly tame and would probably have done this, but I was worried about losing any of my low end torque as you pretty much just leave the car in 2nd gear for AutoX and need that low end grunt to pull out of corners hard. My head is very low miles so I figured I could get away with having another set of cams ground and then use them on my head and lifters, then be able to go back to my low miles cams if I didn’t like them. After talking with Colt though, it was made clear that I absolutely had to buy new lifters as the contact surfaces become ingrained with each other and you’ll get extreme wear if you don’t use all new components. Colt also couldn’t machine the cam towers themselves (they give you shims to space the hydraulic lifters, which I wasn’t down with). So total cost was going to be a lot more than expected and with the risk of losing torque, I decided to try and meet my goals another way first.

Enter the TriMil. My buddy Cam (canadian_pysko here) had a new old stock one of these that he recently had coated and just barely used before removing it. Internet lore says 6-1 headers are good for top end, I liked the idea of having a shorter header that was easier to install and I’ve never been super happy with my heavily modified pacesetter (its custom from the Y pipe back, 2.5” diameter). Besides being a poor quality header, mine had a dent on one primary, the ceramic coating was damaged and faded and I figured a better designed header could unlock a few more ponies. So I acquired Cam’s TriMil…



He had bought it as brand new old stock online years earlier, and then got me to fix the stupid o2 sensor design, and then had it ceramic coated by my coater in Abbottsford (Rocket Ceramic Coat). He drove it for a week, and then this happened…



We don’t know for sure if this header was faulty and the clearances were just too tight, or if the design just doesn’t allow enough expansion room and the extra thickness from the ceramic coating pushed it over the edge. It’s certainly not my coaters fault. Regardless, the header had to be repaired before I could use it. So first off, I cut off the damaged piece, at points where I could actually get my welder tip at...



As expected, the contact point on the other tube was blown out too. So I cut that piece out, and then fabricated a new piece the same size and shape…




There it is welded in. And the new tube back in, damage fixed!



Or is it? Primaries 1 and 2 were awful close too…



Looking closer….



Using a flashlight inside to shine through I was able to tell for sure that there was a crack. Off that one comes too!



Holes and/or brittle metal on both pieces. Here are the repaired pieces and how I mounted the removed piece with a little offset so as to make some more room for expansion.




And all repaired finally. I just used some ceramic spray paint on the repaired sections for the interim, I will get the affected areas re-ceramic-coated later.

Next up, I wanted to upgrade my cat. It’s been so long since I built my current 2.5 catback, I couldn’t even remember for sure if the aftermarket cat I used was a high flow one or not. Plus with all the years of running super rich (this system was on my old 85 SDR PType for many years too), I was wondering if I had managed to clog some of the honey combs in it. So I acquired Vibrant’s all stainless, spiral core, all metal race cat. This bad boy. I have used one before. I went searching for such a thing the last time I built an all stainless system as every single damn supposed “all stainless” high flow cat I had previously looked at (looking at you Magnaflow) has always had bloody aluminized steel input and output pipes welded to the cat body! How are you supposed to build a truly all stainless catback system? Regular steel welded to stainless is just a recipe for rust. So stupid. Anyways I really like this cat. It is short, light, truly all stainless and has big cores. Its not super cheap, but I challenge you to find a better performance cat then this. It says not for turbo cars for some reason, though we put one on Deanfun’s 1jz 85 and its been fine.

Now the TriMill comes with a second piece to mate the header to the stock catback, but not only did I not have that part at the time, but I hate excess weight and the thought of another 2 flanges, 2 bolts and leak point didn’t sit well with me. So I decided to start rebuilding my catback in stainless, as I’ve been wanting to do for years, and to extend it right up to the header. I guess it’s a header-back now? Here it is all ready to mate up to the rest of my system…



I built this from a single Vibrant stainless J bend and that bung is for my wide band 02. The flange is also a Vibrant piece but it was really heavy so I ground it down a few MM with my chop saw. At the time there was some question as to what I was going to do with the rest of my catback so I decided to leave it alone south of the cat for now and then rebuild it all in stainless later on. I did end up getting the missing TriMill part and I was quite glad I replaced it as it was much less than 2.5’’ diameter and had 2 sharp bends in it.
Here’s an under car shot of it all installed…



One last change for the exhaust. When I built my motor I reused some stainless exhaust studs that were on my low mileage head. They were just like the original ones, but stainless and had a 12point head on the end so you could use a socket on the end of them when you crank on the header nuts to prevent the studs from coming out. I loved them, but I didn’t have a complete set. I had previously looked around for them or for some kind of similar aftermarket stud that would work and couldn’t find anything. Then I ran into some in the late Yotofiend’s garage that he had pulled off another 5m and I realized that they were probably an oem Toyota piece from a newer car that Toyota techs had swapped on at some point. So I hit a local dealer with one of my studs and got them to rummage around in their hardware stock and they found me some in the right size in stainless! These ones didn’t have the 12point head on them though so I ground the tips down to fit a 10mm wrench. I also bought some brand new Toyota header nuts too. Finally, another sore spot on my motor dealt with…




So next up, I wanted to lose some more parasitic losses and take out a little bit of the 5m’s pork. When I built this motor I wanted to use 7m parts for the timing assembly as they were built with way less metal. But they are all offset differently due to the longer 7m head and it was challenging enough getting that build done so I just used the factory stuff. Well I never forgot, so I finally got around to it. Here’s my machined 7m oil pump sprocket vs the 5m unit. I had 2 or 3mm milled off the top of the inner shaft to make it match the depth of the 5m part and then it just slid on…



I don’t have a super accurate scale for weighing light parts unfortunately but I saved many grams doing this, you can really feel the difference when holding the parts by hand.

Next up was the idler pulley.



That’s an aftermarket 7m one on the left, and the factory 5m one on the right. The factory 7m one is essentially the same design as the 5m one, but you can get this aftermarket one for the 7m that’s much lighter. Unfortunately I forgot what brand is stamped on it, it’s one I had lying around so I don’t have a part number handy. I did order all the brands of 5m ones locally first though and none of them were built like this. Here is the height difference that was preventing me from using this 7m one.



Part of why I didn’t do this when I built the motor was I couldn’t figure out a way to machine this thing down. However I took a closer look this time and realized the center was pressed into the mounting plate. Into my press it went and voila!



That got the deck height down to what it needed to be, and then I just cut the excess off the center section with a zip disc on my grinder and filed it smooth. No need for machining on this piece.



Next up are these ridiculously overbuilt cam gear washers…



They are twice as thick as they need to be, so heavy. I ground the one on the right down with my chop saw. I used a micrometer to get a uniform thickness all the way around



I took a lot off, did them both of course. Again I wasn’t able to measure exactly how many grams I saved, but they feel significantly lighter.

Here it all is on the motor (lousy blurry photo though)…



The only part of my rotating assembly on the front of my motor I haven’t significantly lightened so far is the crank pulley. It’s on my list though, if someone has or knows of a nice used ATI 7m Super Damper pm me please! The budget wasn’t there at the time to get one new though.

So with all the hard parts on, it was time to retune! I hadn’t touched my tune in years, here’s my last log from 2010 after I finished dialing in my cams and static timing, (the last dyno was before the cam timing unfortunately)…



Key: Red = MAF voltage, Green = Injector Duty Cycle, Blue = Knock, Yellow = Acceleration

I thought I had gotten that tune decent, but after retuning I realize that I had left it too lean before 4000rpm area. This stupid piggy back is horrible for noise and spikes and some of those spikes hit as lean as high 13s (AFR), and in recent years I’ve had to switch to 91 octane to prevent pinging. Plus, when richening up that area I netted a noticeable bump in acceleration on the new tune. Unfortunately I screwed up and made one final change while trying to fix a rich dip at 4200rpm and didn’t relog, being fairly confident I had found it in my maps, plus I had run out of time. I’ll post a new log if I find some time to tune out that dip. Of course, it showed up in the new dyno. Here you go, moment of truth, new numbers….



Versus old



Peak number comparisons [old –> new]:

179rwhp at 5650rpm -> 184rwhp at 5600rpm
182rwtq at 4600rpm -> 188rwtq at 3200rpm

Of course peak numbers don’t tell you much. From that graph it’s debatable if my peak torque is at 3200rpm or 4600rpm. Regardless my motor is already making about 180rwhp at 2000rpm (judging by the acceleration channel in my logs) and then matches that figure at 5000rpm. Which is awesome as your car’s acceleration is not dictated by your peak numbers, it’s the number of rpm that you can keep your motor in the meat of its torque curve. My peak numbers may not wow anybody, but my motor pulls hard from 2000 to 6000rpm. 4000rpm of good usable, linear power makes it quicker than the peak numbers would imply. Overall I’m pretty happy with the improvements. Here’s a graph between my prior tuning log and the latest (prior graphs are the faded ones). The prior log has my cam tuning in it which the prior dyno doesn’t, so the acceleration gains aren’t as huge as the differences in dyno graphs would imply.



The yellow is acceleration, and you can clearly see I am faster everywhere. But here’s the interesting part, once again internet lore is wrong. The red lines are Air Flow (voltage 0-5v) as measured by my Ford MAF. My old 6-2-1 modified Pacesetter actually out flows the TriMill on the top end! Although the TriMill flows better in the mid range, my overall power gains are mostly coming from a better tune and the other mods. The better mid range flow is also bolstered up by the higher flowing cat. Besides that I was looking for a bit more top end, I’m actually not terribly fond of the TriMill. I don’t like that the catback flange is clocked straight down, it makes it my new lowest point on the car. And obviously the design and quality could be better. Besides the fatal flaw, I also don’t like how far from being equal length the primaries are. As well, out of the box they screwed up the 6-1 merger…



Two of the primaries end’s were severely crimped inside it, I had to bend it back out. Then there’s my least favourite thing, it really changed the sound of my car. For the worse. The 6-2-1 with the rest of my exhaust was epic, not only has the TriMill really quieted it down significantly, it also took out its exotic sound. Not to say it sounds bad, it’s just not the aural nirvana it was before. So next up I will be trying an old Doug Thorely I have, but half custom and the Y Pipe will mate up directly to my new catback. I also have finally acquired some standalone, a DIYPNP MS kit, so maybe that and another little toy will be next for engine mods. However, I attained my goal. At autox I am now once again held back by deficiencies in my suspension and not power. I’m having trouble putting it down with the unaltered A arms and rear subframe when coming out of corners. Hopefully I will have that all dealt with and posted this year. And last, I’ll leave you with a little autox vid of the new setup. I finally got some GoPros and just ran an autox at the BC Driving center in Pitt Meadows recently. The audio capture isn’t too bad but it does sound better in person. This one is off the bumper, one of my fastest runs of the day. Anyways, thanks for reading!

 

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Discussion Starter #151
Rear springs are chopped Eibachs. Rear ride height is 2.6" lower then stock, about a full coil removed. Don't know the rate, maybe 250lbs? Damping and spring rate seem good, balance is good, I'm just fighting the stock bushings, extreme camber and bottoming out on the unaltered bump stops like everyone else with a significant drop is. I have all the parts to fix it, just not the time. Relocating the trailing arm mounts is a ton of work.

The car tends to oversteer too easily if I get on it too hard mid corner, mostly from the camber.
 

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i didnt read through it all, but what final drive do you have in yours? might help for your acceleration if you dont have a 4.3 as you autox it. i went from a 3.7 to a 4.3 and noticed quite an improvement (duh)
 

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wow, nice to see the power gains! such a torque monster motor! wish my old DSP motor had that. good to see you getting into the car again. best wishes to the family!

Don L.
 

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Thats odd that your trimil's collector is that bad. Mine the pipes are all good inside. I should be able to get a pic this weekend as I can somewhat get to it now. Im planning to chop the sharp taper off the collector and leave it 3in and run a 3in exhaust when I build my 6m. I imagine that would help a bit. Also, have you thought of modding a stock upper intake manifold to fit a 70mm tb? Carlos Brown did this. Im beting that with the megasquirt to tune it would net some good gains at this point. Has your head and intake manifold been ported and polished? More power there if not as well, though that is a time issue in your case.
 

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Discussion Starter #155
i didnt read through it all, but what final drive do you have in yours? might help for your acceleration if you dont have a 4.3 as you autox it. i went from a 3.7 to a 4.3 and noticed quite an improvement (duh)
Still stock diff, so yup 4.3. If you read it through you'd have seen that my problem now is not accelerating quick enough, but the rear IRS being able to put the power down coming out of corners. With my gearing and instant torque I pretty much take everyone except big power awd cars off the line. I'm going to try a 4.1 when I fix the IRS as I could use a touch more rev range (yes I hit fuel cut in the vid, a regular occurrence) and there's more torque on the way :naughty:

Will, I'd just do what I did and toss the mid pipe and make it 2.5 all the way. I don't belive at all that the 2.5 diameter is limiting my top end, I'm pretty sure its all cam, and maybe intake manifold design. You will loose bottom end with 3 inchs.

Uh Will, I have a 70mm 1uz tb mated to a port matched 6m intake manifold with phenolic spacer and no cooling lines. Everything is port and polished, right from the tip of the TB to the header. There's not much low hanging fruit left on this motor. After I settle on a header and engine management, more cam, compression and displacement will be all that's left if I choose to keep developing it. I'm pretty confident I can crack 200 torque and HP with my remaining planned mods though.

Don, congrats on the retirement! Hopefully that means we'll be seeing you up at Packwood again soon. I would be down for attending next year if you made it up.

Thanks for the kinds words guys!
 

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Ok, I forgot you had the 1uz tb as well. As for the 3in, I will go with it as the 6m with the 45mm webbers and hks cams etc... will need it. At this point, e85 is becoming more prevailant, so I am thinking of going 14:1 compression and running e85 on that motor when I get around to it. Tq will not be an issue with that much compression and e85. My concern with the setup is that I wont be able to advance the timing enough for the e85. I may throw the setup on empty block with a crank in it so I can spin it with the starter to see how far the advance/retard will go. Moving the wires all clockwise one position jumps it an additional 60 degrees, which is likely too much, unless the retard can drop it 20-30 degrees. From my research, its looking like base timing would need to be in the 25-35deg range with e85 instead of 10btdc. Hard to know for sure as most of the info I see is for turbo cars, though even then I see timing of 40+ degrees at 30+psi boost in some cases. Only time will tell. First on my agenda is rebuild the 7mgte as a stockish rebuild just so I can drive the 84 again, then work on the 2jzgte swap, then the 6m HKS setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #157
You're just as bad as me for having too many project cars lol. Sometimes I wish this car was my only one, it would be way more developed by now if it was. But I can't let go of the others yet.
 

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I hear you on that. I have thought of selling the HKS stuff a few times, but IDK if I could ever forgive myself for not building the engine if I did. lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #159
I pretty much have project car plans that will take me up to my retirement, and I'm not that old! Actually, might need those retirement years to get them done. Maybe I just need to retire sooner lol.
 

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I retired form my "job" @ 62 1/2 and have not regretted it at all!
Time to do what I want to do. NO alarm clock.
In the last 12 months,I replaced the engine,the diff and front struts on my own schedule.
I don't have any "Honey Do's".
I also having some fun getting into solar power. I took my wind turbine down last week.
Ready for the 3rd panel.

[URL=http://s514.photobucket.com/user/ddd228/media/temporary_zps5akkl3aj.jpg.html][/URL]

My KYB's are great!
My diff is not a "whiner" now and the '85 engine is doing well.
 
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