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Discussion Starter #21
I had a 1978 which was a re-titled 1977 and it was a Ghia model. Luckily, it did not have the vinyl top. They were very common in Canada though.
I ran across a one owner 1976 several months that looked very nice, but I just don't see the support and parts availability that the Celica Supra has. I let it go. Sigh, I truly would like one.
 

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My 1971 Capri was a nice little car, but that 1600 "Kent" engine in it was woefully underpowered for driving in the United States.

A buddy with a 2 liter Pinto blew my doors off, and that was after I installed a header and rejetted the carb.

I always wanted a MKI Capri with the V6 in it. A guy I worked with at Western Electric had one with some mods to it, and it was a very nice car....

- Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Gamble,

Interesting article. I've seen the Tickford, but I've never seen this article before.
Again, I'm struck by the parallels that the Capri has with the Celica Supra. Tickford was sort of equivalent to Spearco in releasing a performance upgrade package for those who want more.
Even the route they took, turbocharging, is the same. Tickford went somewhat further with body modifications as well as interior changes.
The body styling package doesn't really thrill me, but it's certainly a matter of personal taste. They certainly came up with the complete package.

And just think, an Aston Martin!
 

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A Capri II sold at a Bonhams' Greenwich auction a couple of months ago for $15,950. :eek:

Apparently I can't post links now, but it's at bonhams.com/auctions/24143/lot/161/?category=list&length=100&page=1
 

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Wow Thanks for posting!! 27k miles, A/C California car...White Ghia edition!! Had 4 owners previously!!
 

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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)

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Discussion Starter #30
http://oregonhotrod.com/rok_stock_capri.htm
Richard O Kiser's current Capri

This is a couple of years old now.

Chuck, you are going to cause me marital problems. I see a Capri like that, then see the pics of your car, I feel the need for yet another car.

Honestly, short of an actual Rokstock, your car was absolute perfection. The look, the handling, just gorgeous. I suppose now a days, a small block Ford in a Capri may actually be lighter and easier to find parts for, but your car defined the '70s for me. At a car show, that Capri would out draw European exotics.

Thanks for posting back here with these news bits.

Dale
 

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Dale,

Wow, neat pictures and info on ROK after all these years. I see what appears to be a framed front cover of his last catalog cover (that I posted in this thread) in the floorboard in one picture. I wonder what path he took after ROKSTOCK went under. I do recall an outfit called Dobi that entered his aftermarket parts space for the Capri in ~1978. They even produced that wicked looking whaletail as a knock-off of his product at of course a lower price. Although it might have seemed crowded at the time there in 1979, if he had jumped straight to BMW aftermarket with the same zeal, I imagine he could have made a go of it as that sweet spot of climbing the adoption S-curve was just getting started for BMW here in the US.

I would love to have my old car back but only if it was in the condition it was when I sold it in 1980. Even so, I recall lots of heartache during its ownership due to poor design and/or manufacturing methods that I'd imagine would have consumed anyone wanting to maintain/own these cars long term. I probably replaced the heater control valve 4 times during the 5 years of ownership (at least it was a cheap, totally mechanical part). The clutch was cable actuated, and mine snapped right at the joint to the clutch fork and stranded me one time. Again, a relatively simple fix, although a pain, once the part was acquired. I recall replacing a rear wheel bearing (pulling the axle out of the solid rear), having to have the diff rebuilt due to a bearing going bad, etc,etc. Looking back, it's easy to forget all the bad stuff (including everything else I've not recalled here, lol) and only have the good/fun memories!

Ah, just recalled another one -- I was pulling out to pass on a 2-lane 55mph highway, and just as I got beside the car I was passing my throttle cable broke. Engine at idle. I was lucky and able to brake hard, get behind the car, and then able to pull off into a large dirt area. Fortunately, I always carried my toolbox with me, and I had extra throttle cable parts in it so it was a quick fix. Then again, this was on the Holley 4bbl setup, so not the factory connection, but nonetheless just another of those long forgotten PIA moments of ownership. :)

It would seem now that the Bonhams result is in the bag, we're perhaps likely to see more of these coming out of the woodwork in the near future. I wonder if there is even one ROK Turbo numbered car that has been kept nicely all these years out there?

Regards,
Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Chuck,

I was on the Capri list site a year and a half ago and the person who owned one of the two RSRs that appeared in the Road & Track article published that he still has his car. It sounds like it's in pretty nice shape. I think he knows ROK as well.

I'm going to have post there to see if he can do an article with pictures on his car.

As for reliability, it was a Ford product, and as much as I love Fords, they do have the "odd" quality issue. I remember my first week at my new job in 1980 when I parked my Capri facing a concrete wall in the parking garage. At the end of the day I went to back out, put the gear shift in reverse and the gear shift lever broke off in my hand! My dad picked me up and we went to the closest Mercury dealership and they said that there was a recall notice for the gear shift lever and they had a dozen in stock, but would not give me one without the defective exchange. Well, my dad just lost it!!!!! lol But hey, the most interesting cars are not necessarily the most refined.

And of course, the V6 throttle linkage had a HUGE stick because of the 'S' shaped cable path. I bought a throttle kit from Dobi that changed the cable path into a 'U'.

I suspect that one could build a way better restomod out of a Capri. With aluminum heads and intake, the Small Block Ford V8 is lighter than the 2.8 Cologne. Just imagine your old Capri with 350hp, a five speed transmission, and the handling that it had. That seems to be the direction that ROK is trying to head to.

I'll post anything I find on them here.

Dale
 

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LOL, Supraz! SupraFiend tipped me that you might have a potential fix for the MkII Supra sunroof issues, and I stumble into a Capri discussion. I still have mine. Bought it new in high school (MkI). Restoration is about 2/3 of the way done but parts are expensive (and not easy to find; there's one main supplier, and he's not cheap; many of the parts are remakes (but good quality ones) - very few NOS parts are still around) and time is tight right now. It has a fresh 2L "Pinto" motor (considered the short-block V8 but wanted to keep it as close to original as possible and I don't have the time to do the mods). I picked up a much nicer, but period-correct, set of wheels and a better-looking exhaust tip since this was taken.

 

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Discussion Starter #34
Hi Malibyte,

Wow! Original owner!!!
The Mk I is such a small car that a lightly modded 2.0 will still make it fly.
The suspension is very basic, but with springs, shocks, and swaybars, it handles like a go-kart.
These cars are so cool.

Did you buy it in Canada and then take it down, or is this an American car?

I assume that you mean Norm Murdoch of Team Blitz?
I believe that a 302 Ford actually is lighter than the 2.6/2.8 Cologne engine, but Esslinger sells speed parts for the 2.0/2.3 I guess that could be difficult in California though.

I missed a chance to pick up a Capri II Ghia last year and I'm still kicking myself. You just don't see them. In Canada they were quite popular back in he 70s so where they've all gone, I don't know. They can't ALL have dissolved with the tin worm.

Tell us more. How many miles, what does the interior look like? How easy is it to get 13" tires?

We want more!

Dale
 

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That 2.0L Pinto motor can be made into a beast relatively easily. A hundred years ago when I was building all those NASCAR SBC's, one of my buddies also raced a mini stock Pinto. With a good cam, open header and some kind of small 2 bbl carb I can't remember right now, we got 175 HP out of it! I have no idea if any aftermarket high performance stuff for it exists anymore though. But even in stock form, it certainly can deliver the goods. It was a German design top to bottom and it showed. I think it was very closely related to the German 2.6L/2.8L V6's.
Its smaller brother, actually distant cousin would probably be more accurate, 1.6L was a dog and its bigger brother 2.3L was quite simply a bad idea from the beginning. The 1.6L was just an aging POS design that worked at the time. I believe that the 2.3L was Ford's bored and stroked version of it that "replaced" the 2.0L. At its best, it ran like crap and had a very poor reliability record. I couldn't believe how badly it shook and vibrated. Maybe Ford thought that typical buyers would simply believe that the 2.3L was a bigger, better engine than the 2.0 because of this. Thankfully, we'll never know. I guess I can understand Ford trying to save every $ they could on an already doomed platform. The one supposedly top of the line Mercury Bobcat I rode in once was simply awful. Delightfully tacky looks and abysmal performance to boot. Definitely not one of Ford's better ideas. Poetic justice would be those POS's bursting into flames on their own out of respect for the whole automotive world.
I'll never forget the Cosworth V6 version in the Capri race cars. It's just incredible how those heads totally dwarfed the little weenie block they sat on. That beast regularly came out of the slower corners with 3 wheels off the ground which just seems crazy. Come to think of it, the guy driving it looked like a crazy man. But it was very obvious that his mechanic really didn't like having to change the broken axle(s) after just about every on track venture. But it didn't take him very long either, about 20 minutes as I recall. I had no idea just how much other trick stuff those race cars had until I read about all of it in this thread years ago. Thanks to all of you for bringing back these wonderful old memories.
 

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Hi, Dale -
It's an American car. I was brought down from Toronto when I was a kid - my parents moved to California when my Dad got a job with the Hollywood studios, and I bought the car while I was in high school.

Yes - I was talking about Norm. Nice guy, and I give him a lot of credit for the work he does keeping these cars alive. However, his prices are not cheap. Given that he's often the only source for parts for these cars, and it must be a lot of work finding them or finding sources for remanufactured stuff, I guess I can't begrudge him. He has to make a living, too.

I have seen these motors with an aftermarket turbo that makes the car a lot quicker, of course. Am keeping my eyes open for one...!

Car has 220K miles on the chassis. Motor is fresh. Interior has been re-done but am looking for original headliner material and need the lower dashboard assembly (the original one is still in place but looks its age).

13" tires are getting tough to find. I recently picked up a very clean set of period-appropriate (but not original) wheels for the car, and was able to find some 13" Sumitomo tires online that are a bit wider than the originals. Hopefully some will still be available the next time I need them.

Too bad you weren't able to pick up the Mk2 Capri last year. They were cushier but still very cool cars, and with a bit of work could be configured as a European Mk3. Keep an eye open, they occasionally come up. I am still on the Capri e-mail list, and ads are shared fairly regularly....if I see one for a clean Mk2 Capri, I will send it your way.

Take care!
Bob

P.S. @ray85p - you're spot on about the other two motors. 1.6 was horribly underpowered and the 2.3 was a POS. I wanted the 2.6 V6 but couldn't afford the insurance on it (it was considered a "sport" coupe, while the I4 was a "compact" car. Huge difference in insurance premiums, and I had a $3/hr job in high school).
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I missed a chance to pick up a Capri II Ghia last year and I'm still kicking myself. You just don't see them. In Canada they were quite popular back in he 70s so where they've all gone, I don't know. They can't ALL have dissolved with the tin worm.
Dale
Well, I just remembered where they all went!

https://youtu.be/wysZlALCgdM
During the 1970s there was this English TV show called "The Professionals" which had 2 secret agent type people who shot people, chased women, saved the nation, and of course drove the bag out of their Ford Capris and Escorts!
 
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