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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have searched the web site and not found a thread on this so I thought I would start one. If this has been covered before then I apologize.

We know that the side mirrors on the MKIIs will eventually break and new ones are not available. So the question is can these be repaired. I decided to look into it. I got a set from a salvage yard and of course both were not working. You can hear the motors spinning but the mirror was not moving. I popped of the mirror and took a look and this is what I discovered and how I repaired it.

The mirror has two motors and both function in the same manner.



The motor spins a gear and the gear has an adjustment screw that moves in and out through that gear.



The adjustment screw moves the mirror in the needed direction.



I don't know if the adjustment screw just squeezes on to the mirror or is part of the mirror but it won't matter in this repair method. It is hollow so I think it pops on to the small round part of the back of the mirror.









SO the first thing to do is find the correct bolt size and thread to the inside of the gear. It is an 8 x 1.25. The bolt will need to be made of nylon. I could not find any locally so I bought a large bag off the internet. Not knowing the correct length need I purchased bag of bolts 50mm long. This would allow me to cut them to the correct length. I decided to cut the bolt to 25mm thread length.




The next problem was how to be able to push the mirror to the correct position if it ever gets knocked out of alignment (like it does when you clean the mirrors). I looked at what was left of the original adjuster and noticed that the threads on it were very thin and rounded, almost stripped. Being round and stripped allows you to push on the mirror; the threads slip through the gear.



The noise you hear when you push on the mirror is the adjusting bolt slipping through the gear. To get the stripped bolt I just whittled the threads of the new nylon bolt down to the correct size. The threads will have to be very smooth when finished. I had to do the trial and error method on this. I would trim the bolt threads and then see if it would slip through the gear. If it did not more trimming was need, if it did I had to see if I trimmed too much off. If I trimmed too much off then it would just slip in place and not move when the motors tried to adjust it.

The next problem is how to attach it to the mirror. The attachment point on the back of the mirror is not securely attached but is loose, it moves around a little. I am not an engineer but I had to believe it was designed that way for a reason. Whatever I did would need to be the same. Looking at the back of the mirror I decided I need to remove the small rounded attachment point and put the new bolt in there so I cut the original out.






The bolt head had to be trimmed to the correct size. A few cuts with a hacksaw took care of that. Now how to hold them in place.



The easiest way would be to glue them in place but I wanted them to be loose like the originals. I designed a plate that would be glued to the mirror but also with a hole in it to allow the bolt would go through. This allowed for the bolt to move. This would ease the alignment of the bolts with the motors when finally attaching the mirror. I made the first plate out of aluminum but it proved too weak so I used metal flashing. It is easy to cut and bend but strong enough. I use epoxy to hold them in place but being sure not to get any glue on the bolts. I let the glue dry overnight. It may not be pretty but no one will see it once in place.



Now the moment of truth, time to put it back together. This was a simple process but I was thankful I left the bolts loose. When it was time to push the mirror back on having the bolts move a little allowed for easy alignment with the motors.



I firm push to the middle of the mirror with my palm and it was on. I test revealed the mirror moves in all directions. I will have to wait until I put it on the car to see if I cut the bolts to the correct length. I will get back to you after I find out.

One more thing. If you have to pull the mirror back out and you can't pull the mirror out easily then back it out using the motors. Remove more of the threads and try again. Pulling too hard breaks the mirror.
 

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Just an FYI, but not all Mk2 mirrors look like that on the inside. The ones I've dealt with have a screw on the bottom. Remove that and you can fish the motor with mirror attached out as one piece. Usually what breaks on these is where the spring attaches to the plastic body on the mirror from hitting something. I really wish these cars had the JDM style folding mirrors on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Just one more thing...If you try to pull to mirror out and it gets stuck then back the screws out with the motors until you can. If the threads are too big they wont slip and pulling on the mirror will beak it.
 

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Bumping this cause I am interested in finding out if anyone has a pic of the mirror assembly that isn't broken from the 82-83 that is just like the one here? And cause it is great information. I'll need to go find some of these bolts.
 

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Interesting approach. I'm curious if your glued on metal will stay though. Popping the glass out of the housing and putting some kind of fastener or at least extending the glue through a hole on each side of the brackets would make it stronger, but of course you are risking breaking the glass. That is really the biggest problem I've always had with trying to work on these mirrors is its so easy to break them when disassembling them. Sometimes just one of those adjuster screws is broken, sometimes the plastic that holds the main pivot point breaks and the mirror still works but rattles constantly (Aaron, thats a problem common in the 85 XX mirrors too). Also your trick for using both motors (simulatenously shorted in to run in the same direction I'm sure you meant to add), won't work if the center pivot is still clicked in place. Did I mention how much I hate pulling these mirrors apart lol? I've delved pretty far into fixing these in the past, but when you have a huge parts supply, just swapping in a problem free mirror is always the easy way out.

FYI, Photobucket shouldn't actually remove your images, they will just disable 3rd party linking (they probably have already). Check the forum's notice\issues section, there is a thread with a link to a chrome plugin that keeps them working (which is why I can see them).

Another FYI, there are actually 3 types of mirrors the north american Supras came with. The 85/86 mirrors added a heater element and a little different inside too as I recall.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The mirrors are very easy to break. Almost all the threads have to be taken off or it gets too hard to pull. Trust the old saying..."if it don't come easy don't force it".
 

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I've delved pretty far into fixing these in the past, but when you have a huge parts supply, just swapping in a problem free mirror is always the easy way out.
Are you saying YOU have a huge parts supply? Or you know where one is. I would love to just buy the dang mirror glass with the screws attached to fix this, or just buy the entire mirror assy. I'm gonna try this nylon screw thing here soon if I can't find anything. But, I really don't have the time for it.
 

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I've owned 20 Supras over the years, I may (or may not?) have stashed stuff away for future repairs. I used to sell parts here quite a bit, but I've become jaded about parting cars to be honest. The amount of time it takes to complete a sale is really not worth the price you can charge so I generally don't bother with it. THEN I had a kid lol.

I do have an oversupply of a few bits I need to liquidate at some point, but I do not have the time to deal with that stuff right now.
 

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I am attempting to repair a set of mirrors sourced from a salvage yard. One had a broken "adjustment screw", the one that goes through the gear and attaches to the back of the mirror. I attempted to glue it back together with DAP "RAPIDFUSE", but it was so brittle that I would no sooner glue one piece on and then another piece would break off. So I decided to replace them as described by Aero. He said that he cut them to 25 mm length. The originals are 26 mm, so he was real close, and that length should work. I found a pack of 10 M8X1.25 by 50 mm long from Granger, item number 253264104373. I'll report on any success when they arrive. Bob
 

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I had both adjustment screws break on my passenger mirror. Something to note is they are hollow in the middle. I drilled through the top of the piece after it was out and drilled the bottom piece that was still in the mirror. By drill I mean had a drill bit in my hand and rotated it. The stuff is soft/brittle. I cut the wood screw to length and had to decrease the diameter of the head. Put the wood screw through the adjustment screw and into the base with JB weld on the wood screw threads just for good measure. They worked for the first few adjustments so far. I am the only one to drive the car so I don't think any more adjustments will be made but they still are needed to hold the position.
 

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"The next problem is how to attach it to the mirror. The attachment point on the back of the mirror is not securely attached but is loose, it moves around a little. I am not an engineer but I had to believe it was designed that way for a reason."

Aero is correct in that the screws need to be free to move where they attach to the back of the mirror because as the mirror is adjusted, the angle of the screw to the back of the mirror changes slightly. The originals snap into a sort of ball and socket joint, but become brittle over time and break off. I plan to use screws that have a counter sunk head with Aero's idea of using thin flashing material to hold them in place, but I will counter sink the hole so that the end of the screw is free to swivel.

I also noted that the originals are hollow, and was going to do something similar to what Darrow described, but as I said the parts that I was starting with were so brittle that as soon as I attempted to insert the dowel inside, pieces began to break off. I would glue one piece back on and it would just break at another spot. So I gave up and decided to use Aero's method. I will supply photos if the idea works and I can figure how to upload photos.
 

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Usually what breaks on these is where the spring attaches to the plastic body on the mirror from hitting something. I really wish these cars had the JDM style folding mirrors on them.
It seems to me that the spring that Toyota used is just way too high a tension for the application.
It looks like the spring is there to allow the mirror to fold back when struck lightly and then return. Instead, the screws that secure the spring mount to the mirror body pull out of the plastic.

Would a spring with lower tension make this function more the way it was designed? If the spring tension was too low I suspect that the mirrors would vibrate badly, but the current one is so high I don't actually see the point of having it; why not just mount the mirror with a solid mount?


The Phillips head screws that secure the sheet metal spring retainer to the shell are what typically pull out of the shell if the mirror is struck.

Dale
 

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There is another version of them, with the spring completely to the top of the assembly. 85 at least.
 

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There is another version of them, with the spring completely to the top of the assembly. 85 at least.
Yes, the one I have on my wife's 84 is actually the one you mention.

Murakami Passenger Side Mirror.jpg
Murakami 1984 3-Pin, 3-Connector Passenger Mirror
87910-14710 MOTOR TYPE, MURAKAMI (08/1983 - 07/1984) You can see the Murakami logo highlighted in green.

You can see the spring mount where it has come loose from the shell.
My wife bumped into the mirror from the front and the retainer screw (yellow) pulled out of the mirror shell (red).
It got me to thinking that the spring tension seems extremely high for this part. It doesn't let the mirror shell fold back like it was designed to do, especially on 34 year old crystallized plastic mirror shells.

I am trying to find the spring tension of this spring. The initial tension seems to be about 20 lb. which seems quite high. I am going to see if a lower initial tension would still prevent the mirror from moving around while letting the mirror spring back more readily. I would really prefer not to break another mirror shell.

Dale
 

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The factory spring is around 80 lb per inch (this is enormous for a door mirror) and measures 1/2" OD and just over 4" long between the inside of the hooks.

I am actually repairing the mirrors on my car right now (the drivers side has a cracked housing so I need a replacement), the passenger side is ok but the screws are pulled out like yours (I plan to JB weld the plastic screw mounts back and build up some more JB around them to help reinforce). I plan to get all the hardware (including the hinge) replated, and get the housings painted with proper automotive paint, gloss black.

I found a good site for better springs, I'm thinking these stainless steel ones will work well (very close to stock dimensions, a little shorter. Also stainless steel and only 12 lb/in): https://www.thespringstore.com/pe075-500-43000-sst-4000-co-n-in.html

Ideally the spring will be just strong enough to keep the mirrors from rattling while you are driving. Using a slightly shorter spring than stock (4" vs around 4.125") will add a bit of preload too.
 

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If you take that spring off I highly doubt you'll ever get it back together again. If you just want to patch a broken one together screw the base to the housing and eliminate the pivoting function. The warning would be that these are made to pivot so if you hit something the mirror breaks without damaging the door.
 
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