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Yeah, definitely time for new axels Don, you're dwindling the supply! lol

Actually, with enough force and messing around, you can jam cressida axels into a mk2. That's what we put in Funkycheezes car when he popped an axel out here that one time.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Yeah, definitely time for new axels Don, you're dwindling the supply! lol

Actually, with enough force and messing around, you can jam cressida axels into a mk2. That's what we put in Funkycheezes car when he popped an axel out here that one time.

wow, really? It seemed that I could barely fit the stock Supra axles on, at full compression of the outer CV plunging joint. Maybe you disconnected the shock, and put the wheel at full droop? I could see maybe fitting a longer axle in that way, but when at ride height it seems like there could be some binding as the axles bottom out?

Oh well, whatever works! Sort of how I go about the Supra now. Nothing for granted, assume it will break, hope for the best :)

Don L.
 

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That's a pretty interesting idea! Maybe someone will eventually look into it. Our splined axles seem ok, and if the CV joints from a truck can be adapted to our splined axles, seems like an instant upgrade. I needed something done sooner than later, so today put in the order for DSS axles. They were really good to work with, and not too terribly much more expensive than other brands. The awesome thing is they listened to me, offered advice, seemed to understand I did unusual stuff to my rear suspension that requires a custom approach. Hope it works.

Don L.
The truck stub shafts might work, but only the one side (not the axle tube side, the stub shaft for that is like 18 inches long and rides in a steady bearing inside the axle tube).

And yes, we did get a Cressida halfshaft into my car to get it home - had to disconnect the shock to shove it in, barely fit. And it threw the wheel out of alignment badly.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Just received my Driveshaft Shop axles for my '84 Supra. With all the axles I keep breaking (the CV joints), I am looking forward to fitting these axles and testing.

http://www.driveshaftshop.com/import-axles

They build custom axles and driveshafts for almost anything, with ratings to over 1000 hp. In my case, I wanted to bolt on the axles to the stock diff and wheel flanges (which are 4 bolt) so the DSS axles use a conversion plate that will bolt onto the stock flanges, then the DSS axles bolt onto the plates. The DSS axles are capable of operating at up to a 25 deg angle, so that should be plenty for me. Mine were at 7-9 deg when car was at rest, of course increasing when on full throttle or in turns on a load, probably increasing to 10-12 deg. In addition, I did my suspension arm camber mod (see other thread for this) which corrected for about 3 deg neg camber in rear (car is fairly well lowered with the 315/30-18 race tires), all this added up to lots of angular stress to the stock axles and CV joints. Guessing that as I lowered the car more this past 2 yrs, and also utilized my adjustable rear camber to negate some of the camber from lowering, caused my sudden destruction of axles this past year. The first 4-5 yrs with the 1jz were fairly trouble free, axle wise, running with rear negative camber, and 285/30-18 tires in rear, which didn't require as much rear lowering.

DSS axle by toy4speed, on Flickr
DSS axle 2 by toy4speed, on Flickr
DSS axle 3 by toy4speed, on Flickr

The conversion plates are fairly wide in diameter, will have to see if there is any interference around the stock lower spring perch. I run a rear coilover system so if needed, I can remove much if not all of the lower spring perch. I also need to press out the stock 4 studs in the diff and wheel hub flanges, need to use the longer DSS bolts (conversion plate is thick), and lock washers/nuts.

An interesting project, hope to have more info after this weekend. Gone for a SCCA Nat Tour autox event, can't work on the Supra till next week.

Don
 

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Good luck breaking those! Lol

They look GREAT!
 

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I figured as much. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Driveshaft Shop is very interested in developing a part#, application for our cars, on these axles. I'm going to work with my contact, Tad, at DSS to come up with a adapter design that will allow for an easier install of these axles. Really great that DSS is expressing interest in our cars, so I'll help out and get (hopefully) and awesome product available for our model. Will get my car up in the air and check fitments starting next week. This weekend is all about my autox event!
 

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Whistles
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Looking forward to seeing them installed. ;)

I have a feeling this axle option might be more involved than just bolting it in.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Looking forward to seeing them installed. ;)

I have a feeling this axle option might be more involved than just bolting it in.
At this point, you are SO correct! My issue is how to bolt the adapter plates onto the stock hub and diff flanges. The axle bolts onto the adapter plates easily after that. The adapter plate and CV joint assembly clears the spring perch fine, very close, but fine. Waiting to see if DSS can come up with a different design on the adapter plate that would allow a simpler bolt onto the stock flange and studs. A few pics of my test fitting on the bench:

20180411_101959 by toy4speed, on Flickr

20180411_102514 by toy4speed, on Flickr

20180411_101314 by toy4speed, on Flickr

I can make these work as they are, some grinding, pounding, cutting. Will wait a bit to see if DSS can make an easier fitment. I'm sure the market for these will be much tighter if they are not basically bolt on.

Don
 

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Clears the perch, so that's good!

Looks like we have another viable axle option!
 

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20180411_101314 by toy4speed, on Flickr

I can make these work as they are, some grinding, pounding, cutting. Will wait a bit to see if DSS can make an easier fitment. I'm sure the market for these will be much tighter if they are not basically bolt on.

Don
Whats the exact issue here? Is the adapter not sitting flush on the on stub?
 

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Discussion Starter #33
No, adapter will sit flush to the flange with studs. Problem is fitting a nut onto the factory 4 bolt studs to attach the adapter. See back a few pics, the stud protrude into the adapter, the adapter has a machined hole for the studs, but not wide enough to turn a nut down. The threaded holes (six of them) for the attachment of adapter to CV is too close to the 4 bolt holes, so can't widen the holes. Waiting to hear if DSS can come up with a solution. I can make these work for me, but it won't be something most owners will want to do. Simple bolt on is best, just not sure right now if possible with CV drilled holes configuration.

Don
 

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Im guessing you will have to remove the pressed in studs, and insert a socket cap screw through from the adapter side and put nuts on the back. I have one of those inner flanges off of a control arm I could ship to them for you to see if they can work something else out, but I am betting what I said above is the solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Im guessing you will have to remove the pressed in studs, and insert a socket cap screw through from the adapter side and put nuts on the back. I have one of those inner flanges off of a control arm I could ship to them for you to see if they can work something else out, but I am betting what I said above is the solution.
Hi William, that is exactly the original plan with the current design. DSS sent me socket head bolts to insert as you stated. I will need to grind some of the flange area so the nut can tighten flat to the flange, but yeah, more work than most folks will want. I'll do it if needed.

Don
 

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Id grind the side of the nut slightly to fit against the inner edge and tighten from the socket cap side. Would keep the nut from being able to spin loose.
 

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I don't see why you need to change out the studs. I don't think there is enough clearance for nuts and the tip of a bolt behind the flange. The 930 CV adapters I designed bolt up to the stock flange and then you need to use the some of the small pattern 12 point ARP nuts to get down in the counterbore.
 

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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
I don't see why you need to change out the studs. I don't think there is enough clearance for nuts and the tip of a bolt behind the flange. The 930 CV adapters I designed bolt up to the stock flange and then you need to use the some of the small pattern 12 point ARP nuts to get down in the counterbore.
Very tight clearances for sure, especially flange to diff housing space. Thanks for the mention, I will look into the ARP nuts you mentioned. Never heard of such, love learning new stuff!

If that fails to work, I will have to go to the socket cap and nut method as discussed with William.

Thanks guys.

Don L.
 

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The nuts are actually fairly cheap from ARP. I had to buy a replacement for some ARP rod cap bolts. Was ~$0.50 as I recall each plus shipping.
 

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