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Replaced the fuel filter on the block today and looked everywhere for another filter, no one has "hacked" one in anywhere in the lines. STILL haveing the same darn problem, makes it hard to impress the ladies when you punch it and it hick ups so bad you bang your head on the steering wheel!!
I have done a fuel pump, fuel filter, (pain the butt by the way!!), TPS, replaced the Cat Con with a resinator.....WHAT NOW????!!!!! Anyone?? Bueller?? Anyone??
I dont have much hair and what I do have is really short, please before I have to buy a pair of twesers to pull out what I don't have!!! someone help me!!!!
 

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About Cone Fuel Filter!

I dont know if you guys noticed but I think this thread alone might have sullved allot of problem for most of us. And probably saved us many weeks of pondering what might be wrong with the fuel system. I think you guys might have dug up something worth digging for. Way to go, who ever started this thread!:zzzzz: LaterZ!


P.S. I will have to check my gas tank as well cause like one of the last guys said, I give it some peddal and the darn thing spudders like crazy! Now I know what it could be!:duh:
 

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About Cone Fuel Filter!

I dont know if you guys noticed but I think this thread alone might have solved allot of problem for most of us. And probably saved us many weeks of pondering what might be wrong with the fuel system. I think you guys might have dug up something worth digging for. Way to go, who ever started this thread!:zzzzz: LaterZ!


P.S. I will have to check my gas tank as well cause like one of the last guys said, I give it some pedal and the darn thing sputters like crazy! Now I know what it could be!:duh:
 

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IMHO that little cone filter is one of the silliest ideas Toyota ever had. It is WAY too small to have any capacity/longevity - and the one on the motor is WAY big. Seems a devious way to get customers into the dealership for a 'tune-up'. "My car is stumbling badly and I don't know what could be wrong." "That's OK sir, a complete tune-up should fix it, no problem." ... "Hey Jack, just put 'er on the lift and blow out that little cone, then punch in for a tune-up."

Why not an ordinary plastic in-line filter between tank and external pump? Then trash the cone? Anyone done this?

Bob
 

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IMHO that little cone filter is one of the silliest ideas Toyota ever had. It is WAY too small to have any capacity/longevity - and the one on the motor is WAY big. Seems a devious way to get customers into the dealership for a 'tune-up'. "My car is stumbling badly and I don't know what could be wrong." "That's OK sir, a complete tune-up should fix it, no problem." ... "Hey Jack, just put 'er on the lift and blow out that little cone, then punch in for a tune-up."

Why not an ordinary plastic in-line filter between tank and external pump? Then trash the cone? Anyone done this?

Bob
When I upgraded to the 255lph Bosch pump I put the filter and pump on a plate and avoided the little screen filter. Just make sure to put the filter above the pump for a better flow and less stress on the pump. The Bosch pump will not fit in the original braket and yes I put a clamp in the feed line to the filter . I will be replaceing the barb fittings with AN fittings but no leaks yet so i'll probably wait till next winter . ;)

 

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Guys, a couple of notes on this.

1. The cone is only there to protect the pump from anything that rusts or flakes off the inside of the pickup tube itself NOT the tank. The main screen should stop anything from the tank and that's why the main in tank screen is so large and the cone is so small.

2. Do not put a fuel filter in the suction line of an external pump. Only use a fine screen. Any restriction on the suction line can cause the fuel pump to cavitate ... which is a fancy way of saying tiny air bubbles forming and colapsing realy fast ... and fudging your new fuel pump.

3. A 1/2 plugged screen on an intake filter is far worse then a 1/2 plugged paper filter on the pressure side of a pump. Again, cavitation.


Here is the filter I used to replace the cone in the suction line. Fine screen only, large surface area, glass sight to see any water build up, and easy to clean and re-useable.

I did zip tie a protective plastic cover to protect the glass from rocks ect.

I'm feeding a Bosch 984 on a 5m-gte without any problems at all.

 

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Guys, a couple of notes on this.

1. The cone is only there to protect the pump from anything that rusts or flakes off the inside of the pickup tube itself NOT the tank. The main screen should stop anything from the tank and that's why the main in tank screen is so large and the cone is so small.

2. Do not put a fuel filter in the suction line of an external pump. Only use a fine screen. Any restriction on the suction line can cause the fuel pump to cavitate ... which is a fancy way of saying tiny air bubbles forming and colapsing realy fast ... and fudging your new fuel pump.

3. A 1/2 plugged screen on an intake filter is far worse then a 1/2 plugged paper filter on the pressure side of a pump. Again, cavitation.


Here is the filter I used to replace the cone in the suction line. Fine screen only, large surface area, glass sight to see any water build up, and easy to clean and re-useable.

I did zip tie a protective plastic cover to protect the glass from rocks ect.

I'm feeding a Bosch 984 on a 5m-gte without any problems at all.



Hmm interesting point !! Do you have a sound clip of your pump running? Mine does sound like it's spitting at times .. what's the part number on that little filter ?? Napa ?? Can tire?? What size line is that
 

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Any car parts store will have something similar. They are just standard carberator fuel filters so they are designed to be used in 4-6 psi systems ... which is why they are screens and not paper filters. Not enough pressure to push the fuel through a paper filter and also why I know they are not much of a restriction.

I changed my steel suction tube to a 3/8" right on my tank so that's the size filter I used. Don't buy ones with plastic ends or plastic adapters that screw in. You do not want any air to get sucked in. Much like a pin hole in a drinking straw a tiny hole creates big air bubbles.
 

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Does anyone have pics of the pickup assembly for an externally pumped system? I'd like to see the difference of it compared to the internal (I want to run a Bosch 044)
 

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Any car parts store will have something similar. They are just standard carberator fuel filters so they are designed to be used in 4-6 psi systems ... which is why they are screens and not paper filters. Not enough pressure to push the fuel through a paper filter and also why I know they are not much of a restriction.

I changed my steel suction tube to a 3/8" right on my tank so that's the size filter I used. Don't buy ones with plastic ends or plastic adapters that screw in. You do not want any air to get sucked in. Much like a pin hole in a drinking straw a tiny hole creates big air bubbles.
Well I took your advise and relocated the filter after the pump and installed a screen filter before the pump .... it's is not near as loud and no more spitting ,, Cheers for the tip !!! :good:
 

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Well I took your advise and relocated the filter after the pump and installed a screen filter before the pump .... it's is not near as loud and no more spitting ,, Cheers for the tip !!! :good:
Cool! Glad to hear it. I guess even I can come up with a good idea every now and again.;)
 

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Fuel Problem

I am having a similar problem with my '83 MKII, I put a new fuel pump on it, but it did no good. I was going down the highway the other day and it all at once lost all gas to the engine, I had several people tell me it was the fuel pump that was bad. After spending $125 dollars and the time to change it, I got the same results. I would appreciate any advice anyone could give me on where to go from here.

Thanks, Wesley
 

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Welcome to the forums and you posted a pic immediately. But you choose to resurrect an old thread to do it in.

I'd guess you have a fuel blockage, probably in the main fuel filter on the side of the engine block that is a PITA to replace. The cone filter mentioned discussed in this thread could also be the cause, and easy to check.

Related stuff http://forums.celicasupra.com/showpost.php?p=439458&postcount=18
I'd say search, but I know in this case it is tough to find useful info as it is discussed too much.
 

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ok so im guessin ive gotta take the dam tank out to replace the internal fuel pump.... DAMIT!!!! so not looking foward to this weekend
 

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Okay, it's time to resurrect a LONG dead thread.

I have the notorious 'Check Engine Light' problem on the highway at 4,000 - 5,000 rpm under heavy load.
The Error Code indicates an Oxygen Sensor which could be bad, or it could be fuel starvation.
Before I start draining my gas tank I want to make sure I have everything that I should need.

I am going to get a new In-Tank Fuel sock, (77023-30010, Filter Sub-assembly, Fuel Suction Tube) and matching gasket (77169-14010,Gasket for Fuel Tank Suction Tube) both of which appear to be available. I have the block mounted fuel filter (23300-49065, Fuel Filter) which apparently is no longer available.
Apparently, the conical shaped strainer on the inlet of the externally mounted fuel pump is 23217-41100 and is still available. It is called the Suction Filter.

My local Toyota parts people are not too helpful with older models so I thought I would float this on this forum.

I will replace the O2 sensor, but because I don't drive my car much I suspect it is more likely that fuel filter maintenance can't hurt anyways.

Comments?
 

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I've always found that O2 sensors seem to have a useful life about the same as spark plugs. After that, they tend to get lazy in that they don't switch fast enough. They should switch about once per second to keep up with our painfully slow ECU. Much slower and it gets out of sync with what the ECU is expecting so it throws the only error it can. But for me an even more reliable indicator is a reduction in fuel mileage. If it's a few years old, I'd change it first and see what happens.
However, I've had a failing fuel pump give this indication and a failing fuel pump that gave no O2 codes so in this respect, it's a bit of a crap shoot.
If your tank looks clean, your pump can still be failing. I'd still either check fuel pressure or replace things from the engine working back to the tank. If it's not, then replacing everything you listed will probably be needed.
I just picked up a modified banjo bolt with a 1/8" NPT hole in the top. It came with a right angle street elbow. I also got a 1 1/2" fuel pressure gauge also with 1/8" NPT threads. This bolt replaces the cold start injector banjo bolt and allows you to check fuel pressure easily. I added a schrader valve to the engine side which can be from a multitude of years of Ford vehicles and a quick coupling from this to the gauge so I can remove it. This can be assembled for $30 - $40 total and will eliminate guessing. Hope this helps.
 

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Ray,

I don't fully understand the configuration you are describing.

The standard banjo bolt is essentially a plumbing union. The modified banjo bolt converts a union to a tee with the new outlet being a 1/8" NPT female port.
It sounds like your modified bolt came with a 90 Degree union with 1/8" Male NPT fitting going into the banjo 1/8" NPT female port. I assume that the other side of the 90 degree fitting is 1/8" Male NPT that connects to a 1/8" Female NPT port on the fuel pressure gauge.

It sounds like the Schrader valve is a one way valve or perhaps a quick connect fitting that allows you to remove the fuel pressure gauge without having to redo Teflon tape on a 1/8" NPT male plug where the 90 degree elbow comes out of the modified banjo bolt. I am not sure where you have added it to the adapter.

It makes sense that you do not want the pressure gauge attached all the time in case the diaphragm on the gauge bursts and you end up with an engine compartment fire.

Are you using Teflon tape or other type of thread sealant on the NPT fittings to seal them?

Am I on the right track here?

If I am, where did you get the modified banjo bolt?

Thanks and regards,

Dale
 
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