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The modified banjo bolt is installed just like the OEM one. The difference is that the top is drilled and tapped to 1/8" NPT threads. In fact, you could modify the OEM one this way. The one I bought on eGay was listed for Honda's (and Mitsubishi's?) but it's the same length and threads as our cars. It came with a right angle street elbow which is a one piece combination pipe nipple and elbow with male threads on one side and female on the other. It had one sealing washer with it but I used 2 new Toyota ones from a fuel filter I had and ordered more from Mark.
Looking at how the CSI mounts, this is almost right. I added a 45 degree street elbow which points the female end just about straight up. I could have installed the gauge (also from eGay) there but chose a schrader valve fitting (same as the air fitting on tires and our old R12 A/C fittings, just rated for fuel). There's a Ford part on most fuel rails that's a 1/8" male NPT schrader valve. They're a 1/4" flare fitting with a plastic cap on top. If you have one or wander through your local pick n' pocket, they're plentiful. I ordered one from Riffraff Diesel as it was cheaper. It's listed as a replacement part for a fuel pressure tester. It comes with a sealed brass cap as well.
The quick coupler (JB QC-S4A from Century Tool) screws onto this and pushes down the pin. The gauge screws into the 1/8" female NPT end. This is actually a refrigeration part and not easy to find. The alternative is to use a 1/4" female flare union (the loose fitting type, not a solid piece) to a 1/4" male flare to 1/8" female NPT adapter. Also not common. It could take a male 1/4" flare to 1/8" male NPT and then a 1/8" female NPT coupler. So this unique quick coupler replaces all of this crap and the gauge screws right into it. One one hand, these fittings aren't something you can generally find at your local has just about everything hardware store. And even if you tried piecing part of this together with the alternatives I listed, it would undoubtedly cost significantly more. Total cost is about $40 including the gauge. If you have the Schrader valve fitting, it would be a little over $30.
And yes, as you mentioned, I don't ever want a surprise under hood fire! That's why I chose the configuration I did. In the unlikely event that the Schrader valve leaks even with the sealed brass cap, a 1/4" flare cap is only a couple $. In case you were thinking that it would be nice to monitor fuel pressure inside the car and / or log it along with other data, an electrical fuel pressure gauge is about another $100 or more because well, in car surprise fuel fires would make an under hood fire seem like a picnic and could very quickly turn catastrophic.
All threads are sealed with Rectorseal #5. It's available at most hardware and big box stores. It's much better than teflon tape or anything else.
There you go Dale. A custom fuel pressure tester just for the Supra that's much better than cutting into the fuel line and splicing in a barbed Tee. Instead of the quick coupler and gauge, you could buy a cheap HF fuel pressure tester and have a few more adapters to potentially test some other vehicles but it's not a highly rated product. This just isn't something where any shortcuts are worth the risk! YMMV! Happy Motoring!
Update on 09/15
As I hadn't actually installed this setup yet when writing this, I missed a couple of important details which I'll include here. First, the 12 mm x 1.25 modified banjo bolt with just one 45 degree street elbow to the schrader valve works fine installed in place of the fuel pressure regulator banjo bolt. Everything is easier to install there as well. However, it does not fit the CSI which is 10 mm x 1.0. I did an extensive search but couldn't find this same kind of drilled and tapped banjo bolt in this size. There is a couple of ways to do it there though if desired. As stated, you could drill and tap a (replacement) CSI banjo bolt or use a double banjo bolt that size. In that case, you'd need a banjo adapter to 1/8 FNPT and probably everything else the same as above.
Now I'm going to install a 14 mm x 1.5 banjo bolt in place of the pulsation damper as soon as I pick up the two different copper sealing washers new for that. I can't remember where I saw this particular information on this wonderful forum but if the pulsation damper can leak and cause an underhood fire AND removing it doesn't cause any perceptible issues, out it comes. Oh yeah, that particular post mentions that the bolt can be found on some Mazda power steering lines as well as on 7M fuel rails and a couple other spots as well.
One other useful tidbit I came across while researching this. Somewhere I read by someone that definitely seemed to know his stuff, that heating used copper sealing washers red hot with a propane torch and letting them slowly cool makes them as soft as they originally are and reusable, provided they're in decent condition.
 

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Hi Ray,

This is fabulous information. Gasoline systems frankly scare me so it's not an area I want to mickey mouse around with. The parts you mention seem very high quality and adding a cap for safety is very reassuring.

I have never seen such a good description of a fuel pressure sensor adapter before.

I'm sure that they cost too much, but I see that Phoenix Sensors has a WEPS02 Wireless Pressure sensor with phone app to monitor pressure online. It comes with 1/8" NPT interface.
 

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I appreciate the kind words. It has always irked the f(iretr)uck out of me when those that were involved in figuring out / creating / developing (fill in the blank) can't be bothered detailing it so that someone else doesn't have to even partially reinvent the wheel. Their prevailing attitude seems to be, "We did all the work figuring (x) out, why should we give it all away?" To that I always think, "So you can benefit from what others do without having to redo a lot of it. Get it?" Apparently not. The more everyone shares completely, the faster group knowledge grows.
Of course, even the most minor difference can lead to someone having to figure out something to make whatever work for them. And truthfully, there is some benefit in anyone having to figure even part of something for themselves. But it never seems to come off that way and not just to me. Others have made the same comments.
But I could never be that way. There's value in providing as much relevant information as possible and it doesn't end there. It's just part of my Pay It Forward way of contributing to the greater good. I KNOW it works and that it really does help everyone, including ourselves. And also being a bit of a sick fuck as well, the fact that this behavior somehow pisses off those that can't / don't / won't, is icing on the cake.
We'll have to meet someday. I'm the only non Canadian in my family and I'm only about an hour south of the border. I haven't been up your way in a few years but always enjoy (the good) Vancouver!
 

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Have you thought about tossing a fuel pressure warning light in the system? We need 27-31psi at idle when running properly according to the 85 tsrm.

For $35 this complete kit adjusts up to 24psi:
http://www.jegs.com/i/JEGS-Performance-Products/555/41373/10002/-1?parentProductId=1321858
or just the sender for $24 and wire up your own warning:
http://www.jegs.com/i/JEGS-Performance-Products/555/41363/10002/-1?parentProductId=1321858

Edelbrock has one that does 30psi for $21 but is not adjustable...
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/edl-72213

Ah here we go, 25-50 psi adjustable unit for $47 plus you can say you have NOS! Just add your own warning light and you are good to go.
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/nos-15685nos

The NOS one has a manual you can check out, looks easy enough to adjust. Basically you'd want to make sure your pressure is good with a gauge first, then at idle just set the warning to less than 27 and if the light comes on you know you're having issues. I really don't like having a ton of gauges in the car. Decent stand alones these days have warning parameters where it will turn on a check engine light for you, or even just shut her down if you say so for certain things. This warning light sender looks to be a cheap add on for a stock setup though.
http://static.summitracing.com/global/images/instructions/NOS-15685NOS.pdf

One of these would be nice to know specifics, wonder if it would fit in the trip computer spot... It even has recall so you can show high/low, adjustable warning set points, and an output so you can have a buzzer or control stuff. You're looking at ~$150 though which is a big step up.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Digital-Fuel-Oil-Pressure-Gauge-10-bar-150-PSI-/200730462451?hash=item2ebc77c8f3&vxp=mtr
"Compact size and easy to fit into most machines (24 x 48 x 75 mm or 1x2 x3")"
 

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Good Grief!

I just picked up the Tank Inlet Filter from Toyota and can't believe it's size.

It measures 3" x 2"

I swear that a Coleman Lantern Filament is larger than this.

If these don't tear completely, I'm surprised that ANY Supra doesn't run low on fuel pressure.
This filter is the same for the 1982/3 with external fuel pump and the 1984/1986 with internal fuel pump.

http://www.celicasupra.com/forums/showthread.php?74292-83-fuel-strainer&highlight=fuel+tank+filter

I had seen a picture posted in this thread by Mk2Supra83 and it looks plugged. However I thought it was bigger than what it is.



Length is 3"



Width is 2"

In hand, it's tiny.

Does anyone who has cleaned their tank out know if these filters are still in the tank or are they taken out and run with no filter?

I am still going to check my fuel pressure, but I think it's a worth while investment to have the tank cleaned and this filter replaced. The part number is 77023-30010 and it is still available from Toyota.
 

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Okay, I had the in-tank fuel filter replaced, the 'coffee filter' screen right in the front of the external fuel pump cleaned, the engine compartment fuel filter replaced, and the gas tank steam cleaned, acid washed, flushed, and Red-Kote'd.

The car previously would have the 'Check Engine' light come on under load and an ECU error code 'O2 Sensor bad' would be generated. This has gone away and the car pulls WAY HARDER. I guess I had the car parked so long I forgot what to expect power wise. It truly is noticeably stronger now.

The car had been parked for 5 years with half a tank of regular gas and no gas conditioner. I have had it running for over a year now and the problem would always appear after the car had warmed up.

I had a radiator shop do the work. They said that the steam cleaning cleaned the tank right out and that if I was using it regularly it should be fine. I decided to go with the Red-Kote fuel tank liner because I only license the car for 3-6 months of the year and it does sit a lot. I'm sure it would happen again.


Old In-Tank Filter______________________ New In-Tank Filter


Fuel Inlet Tube and Fuel Level Sensor
 

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Please see correction as well as updated and more complete info on adding a fuel pressure gauge I added to my 7/26 post. There's a couple of other related things added there as well.
 

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'm having the same symptoms with the Check Engine light at 4k-5kRPM's along with occasional stuttering, so I'm planning to pull out and check the sock filter and cone shaped "coffee" filter in the inlet tube. My question really is just how easy is it to access those two filters? Do you guys drain the tank first before unplugging the inlet hose of the fuel pump to prevent fuel from gushing out? And is the sock filter accessible without dropping the tank? Is it perhaps accessible from the round access hole on top of the tank under the back hatch? I'm optimistically hoping that I can just roll under the car, pull the inlet tube hose to get the cone filter out, see a bunch of crud clogging my cone filter, put it back and drive away satisfied with an easy fix.

Thanks,
Peter
 

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The cone filter is easy to get to, just bleed the fuel system first. The sock filter is only accessible with the tank out of the car, the round hole you are speaking of is for the fuel float.
 

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Hi Chris,

What do you mean by bleeding the fuel system? Do you siphon the tank out?
I would think that with the fuel line running over top of the tank that when the line to the disconnected fuel pump empties the gas flow will stop.
Or will it? If it's primed will it continue to flow until the whole tank empties on the floor?

Gasoline scares me so I would hate for Peter to burn his garage down!

Regards,

Dale
 

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Pull the efi fuse and crank the engine. I have taken my fuel pump out a few times and usually clamped off the input line, one time I did not and nothing happened. I also am running an inline fuel filter with replaceable element before the pump since I deleted the intank sock when I could not find a replacement.
 

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I’m redoing my 5m and stumbled on this thread as I’m trying to get a fuel test port on the motor. I was able to to find some solutions thanks to all the great info.

This is a banjo bolt from autometer that has a female 1/8th thread. It replaces the bolt at the FPR.




Another option I’m toying with is replacing the cold start injector banjo to fuel rail bolt. I was able to find this bolt on eBay in the UK.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/361110675174




I’m using a Ford Schrader valve i got from https://www.riffraffdiesel.com/replacement-schrader-valve-fuel-injection-rated-1-8-npt/


I haven’t decided which way I’m going to go, I’m leaning towards the cold start injector bolt because it looks like it will have good access.
 
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