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I need to replace the front wheel bearings in my ’83, and while at it, I’m replacing the rotors with the Brembo’s that have been sitting in my house for far too long. Prior to the work I was reviewing the TSRM and came across the section for adjusting the preload on the front hub. It mentions to use a tool called a “spring tension gauge.” I’ve shopped all around Sears and Northern Tool, scoured the aisles at all the automotive supply stores and even flagged down a Snap-On tool truck all with no luck in finding this tool.

What have other people used to properly adjust the preload on the front hubs? Does this tool go by some name other than “spring tension gauge”?

Front hubs for all years, 82-86, are the same and interchangeable?

Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.
Scott
 

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Its just a spring scale. When I first did this the only thing I could find close enough was a fish scale. It turned out to be overly optimistic (suprise suprise, damn weak egoed fishermen :p). Anyways, I don't care for the method the FSRM suggets for torquing the front wheel bearings. If I were you I'd use the method in the Haynes manual. It just gives you a set torque to preload them to with a torque wrench, and then you dial it back a half a turn or something. It works well enough but I've found that you pretty much always need to retorque the wheel bearing nuts a few weeks or months after repacking the front wheel bearings regardless of which method you use.
 

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Went thru same thing, Scott. Havent seen an Automotive spring gauge for 25 years, and couldnt find one local. Shit, not even "OldMan" Junkie had one. Did same thing as Seamus. Worked fine.
 

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Never have used a gauge ..... I have the magic touch :D all by feel.
 
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I've never changed my front bearing in my first Supra, and I had it for 270Kmiles. Every Spring, when putting back the summer tires, I was repacking them, and torque to 'just below free rotation', then 1in CCW.
 

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Tighten the nut up until there is no slop, and then go for a 10minute drive.
Then check the hub centre to see if its hot.

If you can't touch it, then the nut is too tight, and needs loosening.
If you can touch it, and there is still no slop, its fine.
If there is now some slop, it needs tightening a little.
 

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But the non clicking "momentnyckel" is almost free god damn it..
Just spin the wheel while tightening and its done in a jiffy..

 

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Use a dial type inch pound torque wrench. Measure running preload of the oil seal as in the TSRM with the dial torque wrench. Then tighten until you hit a running preload of around 3-5 in-lb over this value.

The TSRM specifies preload in addition to the seal of 0-2.3 lb at the wheel stud which is 114.3mm/2 radius or 2.25 inches. So 0-5.175 in-lb.
 
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Use a dial type inch pound torque wrench. Measure running preload of the oil seal as in the TSRM with the dial torque wrench. Then tighten until you hit a running preload of around 3-5 in-lb over this value.

The TSRM specifies preload in addition to the seal of 0-2.3 lb at the wheel stud which is 114.3mm/2 radius or 2.25 inches. So 0-5.175 in-lb.
Okay Funky,

Just what on earth do you do for a living?
First, you know how to make the conversion of units, then it sounds like you actually have a dial torque wrench in this range.

These things are NOT cheap!!!

14633


This isn't quite the right range, but a Torque Screwdriver in this category is an easy US$130.

If you aren't a mechanic or a technician, you've definitely got Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.....
And I don't mean that to be an insult. Quite the opposite.

Dale
 

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In/lb dial or beam type wrenches are incredibly easy to find.
I use them every time I build a diff, it's the only way to get accurate bearing preload numbers way down low at this scale.
Same tool is used on wheel bearings / motorcycle hub bearings / bicycle cartridge bearings / ECT...
 

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In/lb dial or beam type wrenches are incredibly easy to find.
I use them every time I build a diff, it's the only way to get accurate bearing preload numbers way down low at this scale.
Same tool is used on wheel bearings / motorcycle hub bearings / bicycle cartridge bearings / ECT...
As you can tell, I'm not a mechanic, so to me, these wrenches that operate at that low a range seem very hard to find.
Where do you find them and what sort of general price are they?

Dale
 

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Yeah I have an in-lb wrench that is used to setup diffs etc. Mechanical engineer.
The torque wrench is a CDI 1502LDIN
 

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Front wheel bearings preload? A bit less than ZERO. Needs room for expansion. I always do it this way:
Torque to 20 FOOT POUNDS and then back it off. Then, just finger tight, cotter pin, done.
 
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