Toyota Celica Supra Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just purchased a 1985 Celica GTS Convertible.....one owner....black body.....I'm currently having a new top put on....but when it gets out of the shop....what wax is recommended to bring back the original black paint job...which by the way is in very good condition?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
How clean is the paint otherwise? Needing nothing more than a wax?

I'm currently reviving my stock 85 paint too, though the paint is in pretty good condition. Basic process I'm doing on each panel:
Good wash
Clay bar (gets rid of any light surface contamination)
Light 2000-grit wet-sanding (takes down any high spots in the paint, but use very lightly on old paint or you're liable to sand to primer, especially on edges)
Meguiar's Ultimate Compound (takes away most all swirl marks, fine scratches, etc)
Meguiar's Ultimate Polish (takes away even more fine lines/scratches)
Meguiar's Ultimate Wax (make shiny and offers protection)

For rubber parts, I've been using Aerospace 303 or Gummi Pflege to keep them protected and flexible.

For light lenses, I'm using Meguiar's PlastX, followed by the Ultimate Wax. Makes the plastic lenses look like new.

Adam's products are also really good in my experience, just wanted something more locally accessible in a hurry for this job.

I've never gone through this much detailing on a car, but the process gets rid of 35 years of light scratches and swirl marks and leaves it mostly (stupid occasional rock chip) looking better than the 3-year old SS sitting next to it. Sure, it'd look better with a fresh, high quality paint job, but there's something about a "survivor" that appeals to me. Lot of labor doing this, but it's relaxing in some way. Only done with the hatch, right quarter, right door, right fender and hood. Working on front bumper now that the headlights are cleaned up some.




 

·
Founding Member
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
Hmmmmm. We don't seem to have a general car care and cleaning section do we? Anyway, its generally not a matter of just waxing the surface. Wax is really just a top coat to protect the paint from bird droppings, tree sap, acid rain, etc. Yes, it can add some gloss but it can't hide wear and tear. As Speedy describes, what you probably need to "bring it back" is what the detailers call "paint correction". They generally start with a clay bar which is brilliant (whoever figured that out for the first time deserves a sainthood). That snatches up all the stuck-on contaminants off the surface without adding any more scratches. Next they may use fine sandpapers for serious scratches, but mostly they do a series of polishes depending on just how bad the paint is. There's different levels of abrasives and different levels of buffing pads. Choosing which and using it right requires some experience. If you want to try it yourself, I suggest watching a bunch of youtube instructional videos first. But that's where the magic happens and makes the car look new again.

Finally they top it off with a traditional wax or there's all sorts of modern sealants and nano-coatings. You can spend a fortune on that stuff but I'm not sold that any of it is worth an arm or a leg. For my daily drivers, I use Megiars Ultimate Quik Wax which is not really a wax at all, but a polymer coating. It provides almost no extra "shine" but does a good job of keeping the bird shit from sticking. But the real benefit is that its so easy to apply that I will actually apply it pretty often compared to the old fashioned paste wax where you spread it on, let it dry and then buff off the excess. The old paste wax wouldn't last three weeks in the Texas sun and since it takes three or four hours, I wouldn't do often enough. The quick wax product takes all of about 20 minutes and lasts a little longer than traditional wax. For my classic cars, I still use carnuba paste wax. They just sit in a hot warehouse with a cover on them till car show time and the paste wax makes a much better shine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
One more picture showing a before and after, and the difference it makes. Top portion of the bumper has been done while the bottom portion hasn't been done yet. Same overhead light in the reflection:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
How clean is the paint otherwise? Needing nothing more than a wax?

I'm currently reviving my stock 85 paint too, though the paint is in pretty good condition. Basic process I'm doing on each panel:
Good wash
Clay bar (gets rid of any light surface contamination)
Light 2000-grit wet-sanding (takes down any high spots in the paint, but use very lightly on old paint or you're liable to sand to primer, especially on edges)
Meguiar's Ultimate Compound (takes away most all swirl marks, fine scratches, etc)
Meguiar's Ultimate Polish (takes away even more fine lines/scratches)
Meguiar's Ultimate Wax (make shiny and offers protection)

For rubber parts, I've been using Aerospace 303 or Gummi Pflege to keep them protected and flexible.

For light lenses, I'm using Meguiar's PlastX, followed by the Ultimate Wax. Makes the plastic lenses look like new.

Adam's products are also really good in my experience, just wanted something more locally accessible in a hurry for this job.

I've never gone through this much detailing on a car, but the process gets rid of 35 years of light scratches and swirl marks and leaves it mostly (stupid occasional rock chip) looking better than the 3-year old SS sitting next to it. Sure, it'd look better with a fresh, high quality paint job, but there's something about a "survivor" that appeals to me. Lot of labor doing this, but it's relaxing in some way. Only done with the hatch, right quarter, right door, right fender and hood. Working on front bumper now that the headlights are cleaned up some.




WOW......that looks terrific......The paint on the 85 Celica is in really good condition BUT I want it to pop........I think a clay bar would be great.......I'm not comfortable using sand paper......then the was.....Are you using an electric buffer?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Hmmmmm. We don't seem to have a general car care and cleaning section do we? Anyway, its generally not a matter of just waxing the surface. Wax is really just a top coat to protect the paint from bird droppings, tree sap, acid rain, etc. Yes, it can add some gloss but it can't hide wear and tear. As Speedy describes, what you probably need to "bring it back" is what the detailers call "paint correction". They generally start with a clay bar which is brilliant (whoever figured that out for the first time deserves a sainthood). That snatches up all the stuck-on contaminants off the surface without adding any more scratches. Next they may use fine sandpapers for serious scratches, but mostly they do a series of polishes depending on just how bad the paint is. There's different levels of abrasives and different levels of buffing pads. Choosing which and using it right requires some experience. If you want to try it yourself, I suggest watching a bunch of youtube instructional videos first. But that's where the magic happens and makes the car look new again.

Finally they top it off with a traditional wax or there's all sorts of modern sealants and nano-coatings. You can spend a fortune on that stuff but I'm not sold that any of it is worth an arm or a leg. For my daily drivers, I use Megiars Ultimate Quik Wax which is not really a wax at all, but a polymer coating. It provides almost no extra "shine" but does a good job of keeping the bird shit from sticking. But the real benefit is that its so easy to apply that I will actually apply it pretty often compared to the old fashioned paste wax where you spread it on, let it dry and then buff off the excess. The old paste wax wouldn't last three weeks in the Texas sun and since it takes three or four hours, I wouldn't do often enough. The quick wax product takes all of about 20 minutes and lasts a little longer than traditional wax. For my classic cars, I still use carnuba paste wax. They just sit in a hot warehouse with a cover on them till car show time and the paste wax makes a much better shine.
I appreciate you advise.......I have never used a clay bar....but all that I read....that seems to be the ticket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
WOW......that looks terrific......The paint on the 85 Celica is in really good condition BUT I want it to pop........I think a clay bar would be great.......I'm not comfortable using sand paper......then the was.....Are you using an electric buffer?
I've got a bigger (9" or so) random orbital polisher, but it's just too big to do much except for parts of the roof and hood. I've been using my regular Milwaukee drill with 3" foam polishing pads from Amazon. For the fine details, I found some cute little 1" foam pads that do a nice job too. I've randomly had issues with the Ultimate Polish I've been using, so I just ordered some Sonax Perfect Finish to try for the rest of the car.

Also, I've heard miraculous things about some clay bar replacements like the Optimum Opti-Eraser, Speedy Prep Towel, etc. but haven't tried them yet. Might be worth researching a little.
 

·
Founding Member
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
I have a 6" random orbital from Griots that I like, but its older than the model they sell now so I can't comment on the current models. But yes, even that's too big for some curves and pockets. I keep thinking about ordering a 3" random but haven't pulled the trigger yet. I too just keep using 3" pads in a drill or just working small spots by hand. I love Griots Correcting Cream tho because it doesn't ever dry out on the pad. Some of the others I've used start dusting pretty quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I think I'm going to use a clay bar first....then i hear....wipe the car down with alcohol (?).....then use a carnuba wax.....and i'm going to try the 3 pads for my drill....
 

·
Founding Member
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
No, you save the alcohol to drink when you're done. ;) But seriously, alcohol is not necessary. First wash the car as you normally would, no special process needed. Then use Mequiars Quick Detailer or similar product as a lubricant together with the clay bar. As you finish claying a section, wipe off the excess Quick Detailer with a microfiber towel and that's all that's necessary. You'll have to judge at that point if there's too many fine scratches and you want to go further with polishing it. You may be satisfied with how it looks, skip polishing and just put a protective coat of wax on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
After a thorough prep work, I found out that the best wax to bring out Super Red is either Meguiar's M26 or Collinite 915. I now use Collinite exclusively as it lasts way longer than Meguiar's for the same look.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top